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Marcus Hast
Works at Scalado
Attended LTH
Lives in Malmö
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Marcus Hast

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The banter between Danny and Dan is priceless.
Danny: You have twelve more minutes in the game.
Dan: That would be a lot easier to figure out if it said 12 instead of 68...
Danny: Yeah I know... Subtraction is difficult.
:-D
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Marcus Hast

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I looked at the license for developing hardware modules for the OSVR and it doesn't look very open source to me. (You get it when you go to osvr.com > Hardware then click "download" at the bottom of the page. First fill in a form and on the next page you get the license.)

First of all, Razer is explicitly mentioned as the company behind the project.

If you make a module for OSVR you must grant a royalty free license to that and any IPR to Razer and any company Razer wants. (Basically they can sell your stuff.)

If you make a module for OSVR you must indemnify Razer and any company Razer wants for any patent, trade dress or other legal problems your design may cause. So if you make a cool project, Razer uses sells that and then get sued by Apple you are on the hook.

Someone else mentioned that you can't sell your own creations made for the OSVR, but I don't think that's correct. The way I interpret the license you can't sell or give the OSVR IPR to anyone else (but they are free to get it themselves of course).

Needless to say, there is no way in hell I'd accept a licence like this.
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Thomas Eriksson's profile photo
 
Ah, good old "Open Core," Open to us, not to you!
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Marcus Hast

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Ryan would be proud of you idiots. :-)
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Marcus Hast

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Hack N Slash 1.0 - Source code release!: http://youtu.be/UtmmyQKBp8s
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Marcus Hast

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dyyydddddyyyddyy
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Marcus Hast

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One simple thing to use a VM for is to try ChromeOS or Android x86 on a machine. Particularly the latter can be useful for developers who want to experiment.

A more advanced thing to try is to run a hypervisor with VGA passthrough support (Xen and KVM on Linux as well as VmWare support it IIRC). This makes it possible to expose the graphics card to the client OS directly. It does require support from both graphics card and motherboard though so it can be tricky to get running. But then you can run Linux and start a virtual machine with Windows to play games. Kind of like what the Xbox One is doing.
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Thanks for sharing!!
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Marcus Hast

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Talking about "Lytro backwards", Nvidia has demonstrated light field glasses. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deI1IzbveEQ) When wearing those your eyes can actually focus properly on the scene so you get a lot more natural light. This is not the same thing as the Avegant HMD as those are still only projecting a "flat plane" in your eyes.

That guy from Nvidia is now working at Oculus.

It's also worth mentioning that according to the Reddit AMA Magic Leap is also using light field displays. Although how they are implemented is not known.
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Last night of the vacation led to insomnia led to reading the december issue of Communications of the ACM. It was fascinating that they had 3 separate articles on the topic of software engineering / software construction that were both similar and very different. I didn't link the articles because they are unfortunately behind a paywall at ACM if you're not a member.

First there is "Making the Case for a 'Manufacturing Execution System' for Software Development" which wants to introduce traceability into all software construction processes. Not a totally bonkers idea, but unless there are some serious improvements in software support then it's a good way to grind production to a halt. It will be a lot of fun for people who find it more interesting to fill out forms than producing running software that does something useful. (The author seemed to work at ABB so that's not entirely surprising.)

The second "The Responsive Enterprise: Embracing the Hacker Way" basically opens with the premise that the fastest growing companies in the world are mostly software focused. (The one not software focused was Gilead Sciences which is a biotech company I haven't heard of before.) The  observation is that companies that focus on software can improve at a much faster rate than the older companies. Eg we can see today how the "hacker mentality" at Uber, Tesla and Airbnb are all working to disrupt the taxi, car and hotel industries. The central concept of the article is to structure companies after control theory systems with feedback loops. There should always be a demand and use of testing, verification and data for decisions in this model. Eg it looks at how Facebook and Amazon deploy several times a day and use A/B testing live to check if they are building the correct thing.

Finally "A New Software Engineering" is the return of Ivar Jacobsson with another methodology. This one is "paradigm shifting" and in my mind almost comically out of touch. The core idea is to separate the different aspects of software engineering into different "alphas" like Requirements, Work, Way-of-working etc. and then making it possible to mix different methods in these sub-category to create a functional methodology that is customized to your team. All in all not a completely stupid idea, but in my experience a team of reasonably intelligent developers (which fortunately all developers I work with are) are able to do this without attending a seminar. They do this by applying the concept of "getting shit done" and changing what they do to find what works best. Oddly enough reasonably intelligent people don't need new fancy concepts of "kernels" (not the OS nor math kinds) or "alphas" to do this. It works just by not being idiots. But then again, it would be a stretch to call such a thing a "paradigm shift".

I also find it fascinating the Ivar Jacobsen is still stuck in the idea of comparing software engineering to civil engineering and architecture. It seems to me like the the reasons those fields can have fundamental engineering procedures and processes in the way they do is because they are based on things fundamentally constrained by the physical world. You have concepts such as "gravity" and "material strength". When you write code these are not at all necessarily given. It's like trying to make one method that should be valid to build all possible structures, and vehicles on Earth; and also handle different planets and space stations... And using materials you make up during the process.

In general I find it fascinating to see what intelligent people who spend a lot of time thinking about a specific problem or area can come up with as they often find really cool ideas buried deep. But I guess sometimes it goes wrong as well...
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Marcus Hast's profile photoAnders Stålring's profile photo
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Antagligen en av alla idioter som inte kodar själva men vet precis hur man ska göra det.
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Marcus Hast

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For anyone interested in the real-time global illumination technique take a look at this video which demonstrates it: Interactive Indirect Illumination Using Voxel Cone Tracing. The about in that video also links to the original paper. It's not entirely surprising that Nvidia has integrated this as the guy who wrote the paper has been working there since 2011.
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Marcus Hast

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Just FYI: the Xbox 360 wireless dongle works on normal Android devices so it's quite likely to work on this too.
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Marcus Hast

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If you use Spotify for music they have a web interface you can use at play.spotify.com. I'm pretty sure I've used that on my ChromeBox before.
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Thomas Eriksson's profile photoMarcus Hast's profile photo
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+Thomas Eriksson I think it uses flash for the audio player part but the rest is HTML5. It might have fallbacks for browsers without flash but I haven't really investigated it.
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Marcus Hast

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Today it's two years since The Verge had their first article on Oculus Rift. Pretty cool to see how far it's gotten since then...

Just seeing the cool projects people have done with the "Dev kit 1" is fun but even more exciting is the stuff Michael Abrash et al have been doing at Valve with experiments in presence in VR. In a recent talk he described it as the opposite of suspension of disbelief. The virtual experience is sufficiently real that you have to make a conscious effort to convince your body that there is in fact not a 10 story drop in front of you and it is safe to take a step forward as you are standing in an empty room with some goggles strapped to your face.
Id Software has just announced Doom 3 BFG Edition, a "director's cut" of the 2004 first-person shooter with new missions as well as refined visuals and gameplay mechanics — including a flashlight...
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Have him in circles
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Software engineer
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  • Scalado
    Software engineer, present
  • Teleca
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Malmö
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Osby - Lund - Gothenburg
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