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Marco Del Dottore
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Launch into space with a Chrome Experiment that follows the entire 36-year-long odyssey of the ISEE-3. See its entire path as an interactive documentary, read its instruments, and view its live trajectory and position as it flies through interplanetary space.

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The solar Dynamics observatory sees the SUN in various ways, wich allow us to study multiple types of solar features 
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Happy #FirstDayOfSpring! Discover the science behind the spring equinox and why today is one of two days each year when day and night are just about equal lengths across the globe. Warning…celestial geometry involved: https://nasa.tumblr.com/post/158627335744/celestial-geometry-equinoxes-and-eclipses
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Felice equinozio di primavera: per saperne di più visitate questa pagina della NASA


#equinox

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What time is it? If the time and day are right, this sundial will tell you: SOLSTICE. 

Only then will the Sun be located just right for sunlight to stream through openings and spell out the term for the longest and shortest days of the year. And that happened last week and twice each year. 

The sundial was constructed by Jean Salins in 1980 and is situated at the Ecole Supérieure des Mines de Paris in Valbonne Sophia Antipolis of south-eastern France. On two other days of the year, watchers of this sundial might get to see it produce another word: EQUINOXE.

Credit: Image Credit & Copyright: Jean-Marc Mari
NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD)

#NASA   #Sun   #Sundial   #Solstice  
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Equinozi, solstizi, fasi lunari e altro... "for dummies" :)

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Hubble Homes In on a Hypergiant's Home

This beautiful Hubble image reveals a young super star cluster known as Westerlund 1, only 15,000 light-years away in our Milky Way neighborhood, yet home to one of the largest stars ever discovered.

Stars are classified according to their spectral type, surface temperature, and luminosity. While studying and classifying the cluster’s constituent stars, astronomers discovered that Westerlund 1 is home to an enormous star. Originally named Westerlund 1-26, this monster star is a red supergiant (although sometimes classified as a hypergiant) with a radius over 1,500 times that of our sun. If Westerlund 1-26 were placed where our sun is in our solar system, it would extend out beyond the orbit of Jupiter.

Most of Westerlund 1’s stars are thought to have formed in the same burst of activity, meaning that they have similar ages and compositions. The cluster is relatively young in astronomical terms —at around three million years old it is a baby compared to our own sun, which is some 4.6 billion years old.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Larger image: http://buff.ly/2nm6fCB
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