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Mani Varadarajan
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Attended University of California, Berkeley
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Many thanks to Aerogram for publishing my piece on the White Science of Meditation!
Vishnu Sridharan looks at prejudice against meditation’s Hindu and Buddhist roots.
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China is the world's worst polluter but largest investor in green energy. This is Baotou, China: This is where they make the magnets we use for our wind tur...
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The NY Times needs to stop treating India as part of "the other" and describe Hindu beliefs with more normal language. Instead of this sentence:

"... with 108 repetitions of the chant “Ram Ram,” which refers to a Hindu deity,"

Consider the much more natural

"... with 108 repetitions of the chant “Ram Ram,” a Hindu name of God"

We would never read "Elohim, which refers to a Jewish deity..." or "Allah, which refers to a Muslim deity...", or "Jesus, which refers to a Christian deity..."
Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, an ideological group whose fortunes have ebbed and flowed with the influence of the Hindu right in New Delhi, has thrown its weight behind Narendra Modi.
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Indians have been named the God's names so i think they have specified. I do not find it wrong. Let every place and every thing be uttered have our God's name. Rosary / japa and chanting is practised by almost all religions.
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Should be read by all as it applies to fields other than math. The author was a child prodigy and is a Fields Medalist

http://terrytao.wordpress.com/career-advice/does-one-have-to-be-a-genius-to-do-maths/
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Over 30 years ago when scholars were thinking 20 years ahead they were discussing how food would be available in capsules and would supplement for body needs. Yes and vitamins etc were manufactured
I wont be surprised if in the future special genes for say maths or reasoning would be available on chips inserted into the body and would help solve problems. Other areas too say art if you needed to study some art you had to use a special gene chip to be educated. Just a wild thought.
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न श्रवणीयं भोः ।
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श्रोतुं योग्यम् - श्रव्यम्, श्रवणीयम्, श्रोतव्यम्।
न श्रोतुं योग्यम् - अश्रव्यम्, अश्रवणीयम्, अश्रोतव्यम्।

अन्येभ्यः न श्रावयितुं योग्यम् - अश्राव्यम्, अश्रावणीयम्, अश्रोतव्यम्, गोप्यमित्यर्थः। इति भेदः।  
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Indian parents too, from the sounds of it.
 
Have American Parents Got It All Backwards? - http://huff.to/18SAtdz
Though parents around the world have the same goals, American parents like me (despite our very best intentions) have gotten it all backwards.
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Read the book price of privelege
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On balance, this is a pretty good synopsis of how Hindu philosophy is unique. Like him, I hesitate to compare it to Christianity or another western religion because Hindu philosophy has so much more in scope than those belief systems.

I one statement I take issue with is "The essence of Hinduism is that it has no essence." I know what Prof Ganeri means, but he's being unnecessarily misleading. As he is well aware, Hinduism is polycentric because it admits of multiplicity and encourages individual investigation, but that does not mean it does not have a value system, or a system of practice, or some common beliefs.
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The interview purports to be about religion not philosophy. 

A good interview as interviews go though I felt the presentation on Hinduism was somewhat 'book centric'. One saw references to Vedas and Upanishads but none to a typical practice like a  temple visit. Hindus really dont sit around and contemplate on the Upanishadic Absolute, as may well be gleaned from the article, but they do mainly bow to their gods, observe fasts, sing in congregations and make pilgrimages. This is aside from a myriad other diurnal and seasonal rituals most of which are personal. 
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KutaH cittavRttinirodhaH?
 
Surrounded By Digital Distractions, We Can't Even Stop To Think

"A study on the wandering mind had a simple request: just think. But many participants couldn't sit still for very long and they even were willing to shock themselves to avoid doing nothing."
A study on the wandering mind had a simple request: just think. But many participants couldn't sit still for very long and they even were willing to shock themselves to avoid doing nothing.
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Photos from behind the iron curtain.
 
A story today with my forbidden pics from North Korea in the Daily Mail...
The images were taken by French photographer Eric Lafforgue who last visited the rogue state earlier this year.
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A Hunk Of Planet Dissolves Before Our Eyes

“The video comes from photographer James Balog’s film, Chasing Ice. The two guys on the bluff at the beginning are part of Balog’s Extreme Ice Survey team, which maintains scores of time-lapse cameras overlooking glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, Alaska, Canada, the Rockies and the Himalayas. During daylight hours, they watch and record. Then they share what they see with scientists and National Geographic, and turn the footage into movies and TV shows.”

Read more from +NPR's Robert Krulwich: http://goo.gl/3pEzes
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Amazing video
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I finally got around to finishing this book (Economist's best book of 2009).  Most interesting was the claim that Chinese manufacturers were often willing to make deals initially at or below cost with big American companies like Wal-mart, using the initial deal to get access to product designs, but, once they had the designs, they'd demand much higher prices to continue manufacturing.

Essentially, importers and retailers overlooked that counterfeiting of their product designs was going to be subsidizing the initial deal, in part because US executives often had strong short-term incentives in their compensation, so the initial savings would yield big bonuses in the first couple years.  But the terms of the initial deal didn't last. US companies were surprised to find their costs rising steeply but often found themselves stuck and unable to switch without taking even larger losses.

Unfortunately, the book's discussion is all anecdotal, and attempts I've seen at large scale studies on the long-term profitability of offshoring are mixed.  However, there does seem to be a trend to move some manufacturing back to the US because of a failure to see lower long-term costs from offshoring it, see, eg, http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/23/more-manufacturing-coming-back-to-the-u-s/
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Outsourcing Back office work, or Offshoring Manufacturing activities, are akin to 'holding the tail of the tiger'. Neither Tiger would leave you, nor you can afford to leave the tiger's tail.
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Work
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  • Google
    Software Engineer, 2011 - present
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Other names
Vachaspati
Education
  • University of California, Berkeley
    EECS, 1988 - 1992
  • Stanford University
    EE, 1992 - 1994
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Say Ray completely exceeded my expectations for Volvo service. They told me exactly what to do to solve my Check Engine Light problem, and made sure I didn't spend any extra money on unnecessary repairs.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Got a good deal on my '12 GTI from Hardik. He let me test drive the car multiple times without a salesman. Only criticism is that he wouldn't commit to giving me an allotment on a rare color.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
These guys are dishonest. Don't trust them. Here's my story. I came here to buy a bike for my daughter. We found one we liked after a bunch of test rides and put it on hold to pick up the next day. I come by the next day first thing in the morning, and surprise! The bike had been sold. The salesman apologized and said he had no idea what happened. I was surprised but willing to accept that mistakes happen. So we look around and try to find another bike. We find a similar model and tell the salesman that we'd like to buy it. He looks the bike over, starts doing the paperwork and I pay. As the bike is in line to get prepped for delivery, I take a closer look at it and notice a lot of tell-tale signs of use. I ask the salesman what's up with that - is it used? He apologizes again, talks to his manager, and comes back and says, you know what - it's part of our rental fleet. Do you want $50 off? I promptly ask for a refund and walk out. Two bad experiences in a row sounds like a pattern. That salesman is still working there as of this writing. Don't trust these guys.
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Quality: Poor - FairAppeal: GoodService: Poor - Fair
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Prompt and professional service for flat tire for a good price.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
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Excellent cappuccino, complex and not overly milky. Hard to find with minimal parking, but worth it.
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Very good cappuccino ($3.75). This is a pretty casual operation. The mugs aren't fancy and will be mismatched. The machine looks old. But the coffee is good. Edit: coffee was just OK the second visit, not great, and we were served in cheap Pyrex mugs. So minus 1 point on quality.
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Can't get good espresso drinks here. Macchiatos are actually lungos and cappuccinos start at 12 oz! They confused our milk too - used nonfat instead of low fat. Coffee beans are good though and nice decor.
Food: GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Poor - Fair
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago