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Mani Varadarajan
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Attended University of California, Berkeley
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Mani Varadarajan

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Nice work. Please note that it's "शंतनु", pronounced " santanu" not "saantanu". The bad habits of the vernacular shouldn't affect Sanskrit pronunciation.
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+Mani Varadarajan  actually it should be  "शन्तनु" by the rule
अनुस्वारस्य ययि परसवर्णः । (पा. सू. ८/४/५८)
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Mani Varadarajan

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Vishnu in yogic slumber on the cosmic serpent of Infinity (Anantasayi).

Sandstone, c.425 CE, Gupta Period, Deogarh, Uttar Pradesh.

From: "Art of India": https://books.google.com/books?id=WQ9gYUuP5acC&lpg=PA82&pg=PA82#v=onepage&q&f=false
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Brahma looks a lot like Buddha!
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Fans of Indian Sculpture should really follow Tripping over Curry on Facebook:
Bhimeshwara temple, Nilgunda, Davanagere district, Karnataka.
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"Children here know they have to have that one brilliant thing  — a national science award, an already profitable startup, a published book, international humanitarian aid experience, a real shot at the Olympics (an actual medal would be ideal), that kind of thing — to set them apart from the whole entire world of other people who are trying to beat them in order to get in to Stanford, or some other top tier elite college. “But I don’t have that one thing,” my friend recently tearfully told me her twelve-year-old son said to her. “What’s my one thing, mom?” This kid speaks three languages and has already traveled more widely than me."

via +Meredith Goldsmith
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Cheluvanarayana Swamy Temple, Tirunarayanapuram (Melkote), Karnataka.
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Long ago I had the bhagyam
I wish to go again Enraikku hari krubhai?
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The legal case for allowing gay marriage in America is as clear as the moral one is urgent http://econ.st/1ES35q4
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Thoughtful explanation by Michael Comans (Sri Vasudevacharya) on the "person established in wisdom" (sthitaprajna / स्थितप्रज्ञा) from Bhagavad Gita chapter 2. 
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Pillars, Srirangam.
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"A majestic figure of Vasudeva at the Venugopala temple, Nonavinakere, Tumkur district, Karnataka."
A majestic figure of Vasudeva at the Venugopala temple, Nonavinakere, Tumkur district, Karnataka. "At the moral, economic and iconographic center of the...
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The link below is to a paper put out by the IMF that attempts to estimate the amount by which fossil fuels are subsidized. The answers are staggeringly large. The good news is that although quite a large fraction of the subsidy is as a result of not making them pay for the adverse effects of climate change, this is outweighed by the subsidy as a result of not making them pay for local damage, such as the costs associated with the effect of pollution on people's health.

This is in principle very good news indeed, because it means that it is in the interests of countries like China to cut down on fossil fuel subsidy even if they act unilaterally. So the seemingly intractable prisoner's-dilemma aspect of the problem may not be so bad after all. In the words of the report itself:


Most energy subsidies arise from the failure to adequately charge for the cost of domestic environmental damage—only about one-quarter of the total is from climate change—so unilateral reform of energy subsidies is mostly in countries’ own interests, although global coordination could strengthen such efforts.

The fiscal, environmental, and welfare impacts of energy subsidy reform are potentially enormous. Eliminating post-tax subsidies in 2015 could raise government revenue by $2.9 trillion (3.6 percent of global GDP), cut global CO2 emissions by more than 20 percent, and cut premature air pollution deaths by more than half. After allowing for the higher energy costs faced by consumers, this action would raise global economic welfare by $1.8 trillion (2.2 percent of global GDP).

It is sometimes said that to persuade climate-change deniers of the need to cut down on fossil fuels, one needs to present them with a positive vision of what the future would be like if we did so, rather than an avoiding-doom picture. Now, amazingly, it looks as though we have the means to do that. Maybe you don't believe in AGW, or believe that money spent combating it would be better spent directly combating poverty. But if the IMF is correct, then ending subsidies on fossil fuels will make us better off, so it will help us to alleviate poverty, whether or not you believe in the other benefits of reducing emissions.
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I have been to Kanchipuram many times but I've never made it to Jaina Kanchi. Turns out I have been missing a historical and cultural treasure.

http://www.hindupedia.com/en/Kanchipuram#Jina_Kanchi

"As the author gets to see these temples, he finds it hard to believe that they are under the control of the Archaeological Survey of India. He narrates thus, "An elderly lady, Padma, seems to be the caretaker; she willingly opened the main entrance after asking us sternly to deposit our cameras back in our car, while loudly complaining about how difficult it was to keep stray cattle and prowlers from entering the temple and desecrating them." The main door opens to a vast parikrama (circumambulatory corridor) and immediately before it is a dhvajastambha (flagstaff ) and balipitha (sacrificial altar). Going up a few steps is the Sangita Mandapam (musical hall) established by Irusappar, a Jain monk. The ceiling, held up by four rows of pillars, is full of paintings. Craning one's neck upwards, one can gaze at an astonishing sight. Though many of the paintings are faded, there are still plenty of them that create an illusion of movement: so many young women walking, young men carrying pitchers, elephants, horses. There is the painting of a Samavasarana lake in which the devout bathe before proceeding to listen to the wise. At the very centre of the huge circular lake, with four stepped pathways converging from the four directions, is the seated figure of the acharya. There are also serial paintings depicting incidents from Mahavira’s life. Some of the paintings seemed to be about the life of Dhivittan depicted in Chulamani. Dhivittan’s life has close resemblance to the saga of Krishna."
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+Srinivasakrishnan L How far are these temples from Varadaraja Swami?
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This diagram of water usage in California gives you a sense of what's wrong with our water debate.

It's now fashionable for people to complain about almonds. But look at what the top water using crop is -- alfalfa.

Why do we grow so much alfalfa? It's a forage crop. That is, it's necessary for the slaughter industry. Where is this alfalfa largely exported? Saudi Arabia.

That's right, we're essentially exporting our water to Saudi Arabia to satisfy their appetite for meat.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/01/140123-colorado-river-water-alfalfa-hay-farming-export-asia/
 
[Epistemic status: Low confidence. I have found numbers and stared at them until they made sense to me, but I have no education in this area. Tell me if I'm wrong.] I. There has recently been a lot...
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Mani's Collections
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  • Google
    Software Engineer, 2011 - present
Basic Information
Other names
Vachaspati
Education
  • University of California, Berkeley
    EECS, 1988 - 1992
  • Stanford University
    EE, 1992 - 1994
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Say Ray completely exceeded my expectations for Volvo service. They told me exactly what to do to solve my Check Engine Light problem, and made sure I didn't spend any extra money on unnecessary repairs.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Got a good deal on my '12 GTI from Hardik. He let me test drive the car multiple times without a salesman. Only criticism is that he wouldn't commit to giving me an allotment on a rare color.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
These guys are dishonest. Don't trust them. Here's my story. I came here to buy a bike for my daughter. We found one we liked after a bunch of test rides and put it on hold to pick up the next day. I come by the next day first thing in the morning, and surprise! The bike had been sold. The salesman apologized and said he had no idea what happened. I was surprised but willing to accept that mistakes happen. So we look around and try to find another bike. We find a similar model and tell the salesman that we'd like to buy it. He looks the bike over, starts doing the paperwork and I pay. As the bike is in line to get prepped for delivery, I take a closer look at it and notice a lot of tell-tale signs of use. I ask the salesman what's up with that - is it used? He apologizes again, talks to his manager, and comes back and says, you know what - it's part of our rental fleet. Do you want $50 off? I promptly ask for a refund and walk out. Two bad experiences in a row sounds like a pattern. That salesman is still working there as of this writing. Don't trust these guys.
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Quality: Poor - FairAppeal: GoodService: Poor - Fair
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Prompt and professional service for flat tire for a good price.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
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Excellent cappuccino, complex and not overly milky. Hard to find with minimal parking, but worth it.
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Very good cappuccino ($3.75). This is a pretty casual operation. The mugs aren't fancy and will be mismatched. The machine looks old. But the coffee is good. Edit: coffee was just OK the second visit, not great, and we were served in cheap Pyrex mugs. So minus 1 point on quality.
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Can't get good espresso drinks here. Macchiatos are actually lungos and cappuccinos start at 12 oz! They confused our milk too - used nonfat instead of low fat. Coffee beans are good though and nice decor.
Food: GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Poor - Fair
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago