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Malcolm Murray
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In general I liked the reading for week two. The only bit I was troubled by was the line 'In the best of circumstances, technology allows professors to offload responsibilities that can be taken up by technology' Dziuban, Hartman & Mehaffly (2014, p332) in the discussion of PLEs. I don't think technology often takes over responsibility - dull administrative tasks yes, but not responsibility - this position seems to be worryingly close to offloading interest in your students' progress too, and that's definitely not what I want technology to do!

Choosing between CC BY and CC BY-SA. I think I'd vote for CC BY. While CC BY-SA is attractive in the sense that it alludes to a culture of "you take, you give back, we all benefit", I don't think that's something we should force on educators (and let's ignore how you could even enforce the SA part).
I could see a case where a teacher/lecturer might take an OER that was good but fairly generic and adapt it by adding some very local content. This might be specific to the class - e.g. relate to activities they have already completed, or possibly contain information obtained in professional confidence - e.g. patient data, which uses real data from a patient who has given their consent to share some of their details with a given year group. I don't think either of the resulting OERs need to be shared back. The first may not be of any use to others, and may just make it harder to find the original. The second shouldn't be shared as it would undermine confidentiality.
For that reason I think CC BY is as far as we should go, as long as the materials we are re-using and re-mixing allow.

#OCL4Ed  There have been some really interesting points raised about the barriers in people's organisations which prevent the mainstream adoption of OERs. One issue I think still needs tackled is the visibility/discoverability of such resources. Whilst there are a few sources that at least some academics/faculty may have heard of, e.g. MERLOT in the US and JORUM in the UK, neither of them really look slick. If you compare the interface, ease of searching and reviewing content with Google Play and Apple's Appstore, they don't measure up. Whilst some staff may adopt OERs because they buy into the message, many more just want to find suitable materials and get on with their research and teaching. 

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Great animated history of typography - just the right level of detail

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Great picture from Richard Glover
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