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Malar Kannan
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The Shoulders of Giants

“If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.” It’s a quote often attributed to Isaac Newton, though similar statements were made as far back as the 1100s. The sentiment behind the idea is that great scientists don’t live in a vacuum. They build upon the ideas of their predecessors and peers. Take, for example, the curious case of Roger Bacon.

Bacon lived in the 1200s, in the heart of what is sometimes referred to as the “dark ages.” It’s easy to see Bacon as a man centuries ahead of his time. He advocated experimental approaches over appeals to authority, saying “Plato is my friend, but truth is a better friend.” Like Newton he studied optics, and found that light could be split into a rainbow of colors by water. He proposed a model based upon the reflection of light to explain this effect. He also studied astronomical calendars, and noted that the Georgian year of 365.25 days was slightly off. He studied alchemy, which is something Newton spent a great deal of time studying as well.

Bacon’s rejection of the blind following of earlier authorities and his view of personal experiments as the ideal seems to be much more in tune with Newton’s era than the medieval world, but Bacon was truly a product of his times. In 1178 there were reports of a bright light appearing on the Moon, which some think could have been due to a meteor collision. Gervase of Canterbury saw the event, but also collected the observations of five monks who also witnessed the event. Gervase didn’t simply trust his own eyes, but gathered data to confirm his observations. In the early 1200s, Vincent of Beauvais wrote about the Earth as a spherical globe, and noted that gravity pulled everywhere toward its center. He even speculated on what would happen if you dropped a stone into a hole going through the globe.

The science of these medieval scholars wasn’t exactly the same as the methods we use today. They were deeply rooted in the philosophical and theological scaffolding of the time. However it is clear that their ideals of a search for truth was much like our own, and their rudimentary methods did show how knowledge could be gained through experimental tests and thought experiments. Later scholars such as Newton refined their methods, just as we have built upon Newton’s.

We often think of science as a specific tool that stands objectively outside our own worldview. But science has evolved over the centuries. It’s become an increasingly powerful tool as a result. So that today by standing on the shoulders of giants, we can see very far indeed.
Scientists don't live in a vacuum. They build upon the ideas of their predecessors and peers. Take, for example, the curious case of Roger Bacon.
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Is there any work-in-progress for a wayland backend? some distro's like fedora has moved to wayland completedly by default.
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Nope. Nobody works on it.
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In memoriam Prof. Paul Hudak.
Esther Schindler writes: Yale is reporting that Paul Hudak, professor of computer science and master of Saybrook College, died last night after a long battle with leukemia. He was known as one of the principal designers of Haskell, which you probably don't need to be told he defined as "a purely fun...
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The second part of the article series about Genode on seL4 goes into detail about the kernel mechanisms for synchronous inter-process communication and the management of virtual memory.
Genode on seL4 - IPC and virtual memory. This is the second part of a series of hands-on articles about bringing Genode to the seL4 kernel. Read the previous part here... After having created a minimalistic root task consisting of two threads, we can move forward with exercising the ...
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seriously?!
 
..the last frame is so #sick ! 
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Yes buddy.. ;)
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yay!
 
 Thorium is particularly attractive for India, as it has only around 1–2% of the global uranium reserves, but one of the largest shares of global thorium reserves at about 25% of the world's known thorium reserves
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unlearning
 
what should i learn today :P
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yes you were.
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Injection OTG.
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An interesting way to learn physics.
Abstract: We describe a method for deepening a student's understanding of basic physics by asking the student to express physical ideas in a functional programming language. The method is implemented in a second-year course in computational physics at Lebanon Valley College.
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Have him in circles
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