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Mahidhar “Mahi” Satyanarayana
Worked at Wolters Kluwer
Attended University of West Florida
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Mahidhar Satyanarayana

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Just having fun in the office..

Hahaha, that bicycle though..

#GIF   #Office   #LOL  
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Mahidhar Satyanarayana

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Why Apple’s iBeacon is under-hyped.

Apple products are usually over-hyped. http://goo.gl/ayBjbO

But there’s one that’s radically under-hyped: Apple’s iBeacon positioning system.

So I’m here to turn up the noise on this quiet revolution. You really need to know more about this, because it’s going to change everything.

http://www.cultofmac.com/261988/apples-ibeacon-hyped

#ibeacon   #apple   #ios7   #bluetooth  
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Mahidhar Satyanarayana

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TIL that Nikola Tesla's cat, inspired him to study electricity
#caturday   #nikolatesla   #macak  
h/t +Laura Whisman 

In the dusk of the evening, as I stroked Macak's back, I saw a miracle that made me speechless with amazement. Macak's back was a sheet of light and my hand produced a shower of sparks loud enough to be heard all over the house.

My father was a very learned man; he had an answer for every question. But this phenomenon was new even to him. "Well," he finally remarked, "this is nothing but electricity, the same thing you see through the trees in a storm."

My mother seemed charmed. "Stop playing with this cat," she said. "He might start a fire." But I was thinking abstractedly. Is nature a gigantic cat? If so, who strokes its back? It can only be God, I concluded. Here I was, only three years old and already philosophizing.

Source:
http://www.pbs.org/tesla/ll/story_youth.html
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Mahidhar Satyanarayana

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Whats happening in ya'll CIRCLES?
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I'm sure they've got a room full of people plugging any feature holes G+ has exposed.
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Mahidhar Satyanarayana

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Spare Tire Parking System?
Now that's a classic

http://imgur.com/gallery/V1GjhvI
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"they are beautiful" #eyeofthebeholder   
 
I was asked on Twitter why Python uses 0-based indexing, with a link to a new (fascinating) post on the subject (http://exple.tive.org/blarg/2013/10/22/citation-needed/). I recall thinking about it a lot; ABC, one of Python's predecessors, used 1-based indexing, while C, the other big influence, used 0-based. My first few programming languages (Algol, Fortran, Pascal) used 1-based or variable-based. I think that one of the issues that helped me decide was slice notation.

Let's first look at use cases. Probably the most common use cases for slicing are "get the first n items" and "get the next n items starting at i" (the first is a special case of that for i == the first index). It would be nice if both of these could be expressed as without awkward +1 or -1 compensations.

Using 0-based indexing, half-open intervals, and suitable defaults (as Python ended up having), they are beautiful: a[:n] and a[i:i+n]; the former is long for a[0:n].

Using 1-based indexing, if you want a[:n] to mean the first n elements, you either have to use closed intervals or you can use a slice notation that uses start and length as the slice parameters. Using half-open intervals just isn't very elegant when combined with 1-based indexing. Using closed intervals, you'd have to write a[i:i+n-1] for the n items starting at i. So perhaps using the slice length would be more elegant with 1-based indexing? Then you could write a[i:n]. And this is in fact what ABC did -- it used a different notation so you could write a@i|n.(See http://homepages.cwi.nl/~steven/abc/qr.html#EXPRESSIONS.)

But how does the index:length convention work out for other use cases? TBH this is where my memory gets fuzzy, but I think I was swayed by the elegance of half-open intervals. Especially the invariant that when two slices are adjacent, the first slice's end index is the second slice's start index is just too beautiful to ignore. For example, suppose you split a string into three parts at indices i and j -- the parts would be a[:i], a[i:j], and a[j:].

So that's why Python uses 0-based indexing.
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Mahidhar Satyanarayana

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Sencha demonstrates HTML 5 can be faster than native iOS or Android apps (Facebook example)

You've heard that Facebook switched from HTML 5 to "native" apps on iOS and Android recently to "speed them up." That pissed off the developers from Sencha http://www.sencha.com/

So they built a Facebook app completely in HTML 5 that's even faster than the native Android and iOS apps that Facebook released last week. 

Sencha builds HTML 5 programming tools and here we discuss the market for app developers and the choices they have to make. Later today I'll be at Facebook and will ask them more about why they can't match the speed Sencha displays here.

This blew away many of my assumptions of native vs. HTML 5 and proved that I was wrong when I said that the reason Facebook's app was faster was because it was native. 

Did it change your assumptions?

Attached here is the video I shot at my house on Friday. 

More from Sencha: 

- Sencha's own Video: http://vimeo.com/55486684
- Fastbook App: http://fb.html5isready.com
- HTML5 Is Ready App Contest: http://html5isready.com
- Blog post on tech details: http://www.sencha.com/blog/the-making-of-fastbook
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Have him in circles
59 people
Prajeesh Prathap's profile photo
Inspirational Quotes .'s profile photo
Kiran Patil's profile photo
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Tracy Latour's profile photo
Pramod Bidrupane's profile photo
Rob Snyder's profile photo
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  • University of West Florida
    2006
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