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Mae Sakharov
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College and Career Counselor
College and Career Counselor

91 followers
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"All the hype about building resilience in every child may be misguided. Children who are vulnerable need to be resilient. But children with lots of advantages at home, school and in their communities need strengths tempered by a dose of reality".

June-she is here- and-its good. I never got completely over May anxiety-childhood induced-but have consistently done a better job. Long ago, when I was in Seventh grade we had a substitute teacher who was lived several blocks away She gave us a writing assignment for homework. The next day, I share my story, and subsequently she took me aside. "I am going to submit your work for publication". I was flabbergasted unused to affirmation. Then she said something like this, "You and your brothers were born into a family where creativity and intelligence was not appreciated.. Keep writing". This was amazingly kind, and fortunately my brothers and myself were strong enough to escape and build productive successful lives. Many are not that fortunate. Children, are never property and in the years since I have met and worked with many families in which their is a seeming mismatch. However, it is the parents responsibility to transcend and the child's if necessary to escape. Hello June! https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/nurturing-resilience/201603/horrible-true-early-abuse-can-create-strength

Horrible but True: Early Abuse Can Create Strength
A dangerous home does not always impair a child's functioning
PSYCHOLOGYTODAY.COM

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We made it to Friday again!! Episode 57 of The Clip Out is ready and features Mae Sakharov! This wonderful woman has more experience in her little finger than most of us can hope to achieve in our entire lives - you are not going to want to miss her fascinating stories! https://aca.st/0ab489

One of my initial educational goals was to become a Clinical psychologist. While at Columbia, and prior I took many courses and my dissertation advisor, was a Clinical psychologist. Along with courses, I volunteered and worked at many different therapeutic environments- most lovingly remembered is the Educational Institute, founded by a student of Anna Freud. I learned and have practiced when a wound is opened closure is necessary. Hurting children (people) are often left without the coping skills and armor needed to move forward. Opening wounds that have not been provided with tools to move forward is irresponsible, provocative and dangerous.

I would describe myself as a hard worker, in all endeavors. Over the years, it has been my pleasure to guide thousands of young people and adults in my private practice as a College Counselor and as a Professor. Once committed to a student, until it is out of my hands-I will do my best to find and secure the right placement. However, with a caveat, which is not to lie about what an individual can do and accomplish upon a parents request. Quite a few kids have been on the Spectrum (now terminology) and some have made a successful transitions to college and the world of work. Social skills, have continued to be challenging-putting a cap on some professions. A current student, really faces challenges in a college environment-and would benefit from living at home as a commuter. He is quite brilliant in mathematics, but can barely write a sentence without support, and is in constant movement.I foresee disaster with a roommate and all of the maturation that is first year of college. Initially, his parents were realistic, sadly not now. Yesterday, morning I received an essay that he was sending to a summer program at a prestigious university. is A quick scan, revealed that it was written by an adult, one with English as a Second Language. I know it is difficult to put aside dreams for a child that one deeply loves-but to set them up for failure should not be an option. Recently, I was at a lecture in which the speaker shared that 70,000 applicants on the Spectrum are expected to be applying to college in the next years. Making the right and honest choices is so important- and I hope the family whose story I am sharing comes back to Earth-so that we can make an honest evaluation of a placement where their son can succeed and be supported.
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I always like to study the first round of acceptances to notice any trends in the process of applying to college.

1) Community Service does count, when it has a history, evolves over time in terms of responsibility, and is most often not tied to a school club. Real service, is work, takes efforts often away from the home environment-however this does not mean Noblesse oblige- a real no-no.

2) Sadly, many families despite being warned apply to far to many colleges-sometimes 20-30. Choices are made arbitrarily without visits based on hearsay. Deciding to apply to a college with a binding Early Decision option is a huge mistake-without a visit(s)

3) Deferrals, are far to common-with some schools having Early Decision and Early Action options- it is not difficult to ascertain the committed student.

4) Early Decision applications way up sometimes up to 20% at highly competitive schools-making for more rejections

5) Active recruiting continues for underserved- QuestBridge

6) 25% of ED applicants accepted to Penn were Legacy

7) MIT says “…Though they all do different things – baking and beekeeping, powerlifting and politicking, tennis and tensors – they are united by a shared standard of rigorous academics, high characters and a strong match with MIT’s mission to use science, technology, and the useful arts to make the world a better place.”

8) The good news is everyone will find the right college home and/or grow to understand that the college where they are wanted is the place where they will succeed.

The beginning results from my work as a College Counselor and advisor
Early Decision and Restrictive Early Action
Cornell University
Emory University
Georgetown University
Lehigh University
London School of Economics and Political Science
Princeton University
The University of Edinburgh
University of Notre Dame 2

Early Action/Rolling Admissions
Alfred University
Arcadia University
Arizona State University
Auburn University
Beloit College
Belmont University
Case Western Reserve University
College of Wooster
DePaul University
Drexel University 4 Honors
Fordham University-Full tuition Lincoln Center-
Fordham 3
Ithaca College
Johnson & Wales University
Indiana University- Kelley School of Business
Pennsylvania State University-College of Engineering
Rutgers University-3
Saint Joseph’s University
Temple University
Towson University-2
University of Delaware College of Engineering (RD school special admission)
University of Hartford
University of Michigan School of Computer Science
University of Michigan School of Engineering
University of Pittsburgh (13+)
University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business
University of South Carolina
University of Vermont
University of Wisconsin
Villanova University
West Chester University Honors Program

Deferred
Boston College
Brown University
Cornell University
Georgetown University
MIT 2
Temple University School of Nursing
University of Chicago
Tulane University
University of Michigan 2
Villanova

Nursing
Bloomsburg University
Rowan University
Seton Hall
Stockton University
University of Pittsburgh
Widener University

Graduate School
Thomas Jefferson University School of Nursing
Johns Hopkins University Accelerated Nursing program to Nurse Practitioner
Belmont University School of Nursing
Gwynedd Mercy College School of Nursing
University of South Carolina School of Pharmacy
University of Miami School of Nursing
MGH Institute School of Nursing

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My undergraduate school was in California, first in Santa Barbara and later in San Francisco. Soon after, beginning classes at was then San Francisco State, I met Debbie and Diane. We were all in the undergraduate program in literacy, storytelling and teaching reading. Both friends were about ten years younger then I who started college at 28 years-old. Debbie is African American and Diane has a SF Italian background. Both were quite small, we bonded and took all of our classes together. When we found out about the Reading Improvement Center, we joined and came under the tutorage of William PJ Costello- a brilliant teacher who used comics to teach reading to juvenile's.

My pals and I made a proposal to begin tutoring reading at SF Girls Center Juvenile Hall and at Rooftop and experiential school. I don't know how but we made it happen. And for two years we volunteered every Friday night in the lockup facility for girls from 11-18 and on Wednesday afternoons at the school. We were the first to be permitted to volunteer in what was truly a jail. Over time we got to know the girls quite well and even attended a dance with them at a boys center down the coast.

When I graduated from SF State- the program continued and it looks like it still does in a different form. Applying to Columbia, The Head of the Education Department (who I never took a class with) wrote my letter of recommendation. Later I found out that it was excellent, stressing the programs that we created. When my acceptance latter came from Teachers College Columbia University, I was one of 4 accepted.

I mention this because on my test for graduate school the Millers Analogy-- I scored among the lowest- a prognosticator for not finishing a doctorate (80%) do not.. Well that was not the case. I finished, had straight A grades, and was published.

This is mentioned not to brag, but to emphasize that it is not test scores that make for acceptance, nor grades in high school, it is capturing those moments with the right people that lead to true achievement-encouraging others and giving them a window of a better life.

I will never forget those girls-among my most memorable students. Several wrote to me for years, and sent pictures. Ioved the one of Linda, in her shirt emblazoned with a marijuana leaf.

http://www.cjcj.org/Direct-services/Youth-Justice-Mentoring-Program.html

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College Counseling goes on all year, and is also seasonal. Applications have been sent out since late July (for some state colleges/universities), others with Early Decision or Early Action options begin taking applications from mid-October until November the first. The final day- to submit for most is January the first. Needless to say the last weeks have been very busy.

So many wonderful impressive young people—this year a range from several National Merit Finalists to kids that are poor test takers-and choose the many test optional schools.

Several weeks ago, I was asked to join a really exciting project—more to come ---but related.

1) Cornell- because of the many pre-professional options and business school has become even more competitive
2) The Coalition Application (Part of College Net)-is so user friendly
3) Families continue to think financial aid means scholarships not loans
4) More students have higher test scores while more colleges are giving them less credence
5) Having a finance major might not be the best choice
6) Still way too much future think
7) Still no little understanding of getting accepted into a major and needing two years of a specific grade point to start taking classes to achieve that goal
8) Gap year, can get athletes a stronger placement-
9) Essays continue to be generic still to many 3 week community service without thinking why
10) Not enough checking Bureau of Labor Statistics for starting salaries and looking at schools where one will not fall into deep debt
11) If a college says they do not have merit, it is true
My website is in the New Google Sites, just tap on Home and you will get there.. New Sites is not completely adjusted yet.
www.maesakharov.com

College Counseling goes on all year, and is also seasonal. Applications have been sent out since late July (for some state colleges/universities), others with Early Decision or Early Action options begin taking applications from mid-October until November the first. The final day- to submit for most is January the first. Needless to say the last weeks have been very busy.

So many wonderful impressive young people—this year a range from several National Merit Finalists to kids that are poor test takers-and choose the many test optional schools.

Several weeks ago, I was asked to join a really exciting project—more to come ---but related.

1) Cornell- because of the many pre-professional options and new business school has become even more competitive
2) Ithaca no longer has its negative reputation
3) Families continue to think financial aid means scholarships not loans
4) More students have higher test scores while more colleges are giving them less credence
5) Having a finance major might not be the best choice
6) Still way too much future think
7) Still no little understanding of getting accepted into a major and needing two years of a specific grade point to start taking classes to achieve that goal
8) Gap year, can get athletes a stronger placement-
9) Essays continue to be generic still to many 3 week community service without thinking why
10) Not enough checking bureau of labor statistics for starting salaries and looking at schools where one will not fall into deep debt
11) If a college says they do not have merit, it is true

The most generic of the recent batch of college essays is not about grandparents, or two week guided mission trips. No, not these tried and true which still have merit if tapped into the source. What I have read time and time again as to be cloned are essays about sports injuries and the euphoria that comes with maturing. Of course, this can be catastrophic and lead to dreams deferred-but-it is so pat to say--I have put my dreams behind me--and am more mature. If this must be a statement tell the truth-that having an injury was maddening-and led to depression, anger, drop in grades maybe. This is especially true for the student that does not have strong grades, test scores, or taken challenging courses. Unless superiorly gifted most high school athletes will end their career with graduation-taking memories with them. Just this week, I read two of these uninspired essays-today comes another I hope I can get the student to pivot and be more introspective.
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