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Maayan Windmuller
3,454 followers -
Engineer by profession, photographer by passion!
Engineer by profession, photographer by passion!

3,454 followers
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#BWproject2018 | Week 16/26: The sky/look up
tribute to the gods

During our summer holidays in the Campania region of southern Italy, we spent half a day exploring the site of the Ancient Greek colony of Poseidonia. Doing this with a six-year-old means that, before you know, you are moving from explaining the resistance of stone vs. wood (โ€žwhy doesnโ€˜t the temple have a roof?โ€œ) to a philosophical discussion about the almighty Jewish/Christian god vs. the plethora of Greek deities. I love being a dad! ๐Ÿ˜

For +The B&W Project, curated by +Pat Kight, +Art through the Aperture Photography, +Stuart Vivian and myself.

#BWproject2018_16of26 #mayphoto
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#BWproject2018 | Week 15/26: Party
champions du monde!

With the World Cup going on during my stay in French Guiana, I could witness the number of French flags visible in the streets growing as one potential finalist after the other dropped out. This was only a small part of the party after France won the final against Croatia ๐Ÿ˜

For +The B&W Project, curated by +Pat Kight, +Art through the Aperture Photography, +Stuart Vivian and myself.

#BWproject2018_15of26 #mayphoto
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#BWproject2018 | Week 14/26: Get down low
dry season

July is supposed to be the dry season in French Guiana, but as in Northern Europe, this year is different. While Europe is suffering from a heat wave and longing for some downpour, down here it has rained cats and dogs, and then some more dogs and just for the fun of it, some cows too!

For +The B&W Project, curated by +Pat Kight, +Art through the Aperture Photography, +Stuart Vivian and myself.

#BWproject2018_14of26 #mayphoto
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sur le maroni | nine
boy and girl

A contemplative moment between chores and playtime.
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*sur le maroni*| eight
curiosity

There were dogs in most of the villages we stopped at and they all looked like they didnโ€™t get a lot to eat, which is probably due to the fact that they are living off the leftovers. This young dog seemed to measure me up to see if I was worth the effort, or maybe to judge whether I was a threat or not, and then wandered off to play with his buddies ๐Ÿ˜Š.
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sur le maroni | seven
girl fishing

This is my absolute favourite of the whole series and I am so glad I was quick enough to snap this shot. I just love the little girlโ€™s posture and expression! And it is a good example of storytelling trumping sharpness ๐Ÿ˜
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sur le maroni | six
preparing couac

On our first stop, we could witness the women of the village as they prepared Couac. It had already been ground into coarse grains and they were roasting it on a big rectangular pan. It is often served with typical creole meals, but this is the first time I tasted freshly prepared Couac. It tasted delicious, with a slight note of Parmesan cheese! John discouraged us from taking photos in the village itself, but I sneaked a few shots from the pirogue ๐Ÿ˜Œ.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Couac
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*sur le maroni* | five
our pirogue

To this day, the main transportation means on the Maroni are pirogues, huge wooden canoes driven by an outboard motor (although ours still had one paddle for emergencies - which we had to use later btw ๐Ÿ˜‰). Our pirogue was about 18 to 20 meters long, but on our trip, we saw much bigger ones plowing through the water, packed with goods so that the edge was barely above the waterline. It had ample space to hold twelve people, our bags and all the equipment John had brought along for our overnight stay. Btw, in the rear you can see the Rastafarian flag ๐Ÿ˜Ž.
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sur le maroni | four
john

Meet John, our guide, pilot, cook and storyteller. He was a bit of crackpot and completely stoned the whole time (his boat flew the Rastafarian flag and he had a bag slung across his shoulder he took with him everywhere ๐Ÿ˜Ž), but his knowledge about the jungle was astounding. He had a story about every plant or herb and really made this trip an experience!
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sur le maroni | three
steel island

Another view of the sunken hull. This will probably be the cover of my book, and it will definitely end up on my wall!
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