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Mfive Chicago
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Latest Blog Post: Part Two; your bathroom: It’s been a long time since I last wrote this blog.  I started to write about bathroom renovations and got as far as commenting on toilets.  Perhaps our most intimate household fixture, but far from the most glamorous. So now I’ll move on to sexier design choices in the bathroom. Probably the biggest change one can make to a bathroom is converting a tub to a shower.  Ten or twenty years ago your realtor would tell you that doing this was an absolute disaster for resale.  Not only should you leave the tub, but also you should install a whirlpool.  The thinking was that women loved taking baths, and having a tub in the master bedroom was a necessity. That thinking seems to be changing dramatically.  The clients with whom I deal, if they’re thinking about improving their master bath, almost always want to take out the tub and build a big shower. (Of course the best option is a big tub and big shower, but few homes have enough space.)   I think the reason for this is simple.  Most people shower every day, and might take a bath once a month.  And anyone with more than one bathroom does have another tub.  And it’s so much nicer to step over four inches than twenty inches and to have room to move around in the shower. Here’s what you have to know if you’re thinking about changing your tub to a shower.  First, there are basically three choices for the base.  The most economical is precast fiberglass.  These cost $200 to $500 depending on size and you can buy them at Home Depot.  You’re limited by the sizes offered, and most of them are only available in white.  Next, there are some vendors who make custom cultured marble bases.  These look nothing like traditional cheap and ugly cultured marble sinks.  There are probably fifty choices of colors and patterns, and you can order absolutely any size or shape you want.  These cost between $500 and $1,000 in general, depending on size and finish.  One nice advantage to these for the installer; they come with a lip that extends up from the base so it’s very easy to install tile in a way that virtually guarantees no leaks.  Finally, there’s the traditional site installed custom tile base.  The installer builds a wood frame around the shower base and fills it with concrete.  Tile is installed over the concrete. This technique is a lot more difficult than I’m making it sound.  Because there are a number of steps required both to install the base and to make the shower waterproof, a custom base costs thousands, not hundreds of dollars.  I can’t give you a range because there are too many variables, but this approach is the nicest and most expensive.  It’s also most prone to leaks and water problems if it’s not done perfectly. Here’s the next thing you have to know about converting from a tub to a shower.  You have to change the plumbing in the wall.  Your tub usually has a valve located about 34 inches above the floor, a foot or so above the tub spout.  The water automatically comes out of the tub faucet until you pull up on the diverter and send it to the shower.  Once you get rid of the tub, you won’t feel like bending down to turn on the water, and the tub spout would look pretty stupid without a tub.  So one of the first steps we take when converting a tub to a shower is to open up the wall, take out the valve that’s in the wall, and remove the tub spout.  Then we put in a new valve.  And there’s more choices here.  Do you want just a showerhead or would you like two of them, so you and your partner can shower together?  Do you want  body sprays, a hand held wand, a rain shower head?  Do you want to install a steam unit?  What kind of valve do you want?  There are two basic choices; thermostatic and pressure balanced.  Pressure balanced is what you normally think of when you picture a shower or tub control.  You turn it on and choose the temperature by moving it from cold to hot.  Thermostatic valves have two components.  You select the temperature and can leave the control set there.  When you turn on the water you’re only choosing the volume or water pressure.  If you choose to put in a number of different body sprays and showerheads, the thermostatic valve is the best choice, because you leave it constant and just turn the control for the water you want.  I feel like a guest who’s overstayed his welcome.  My wife told me when I started writing these posts to limit them to one page.  So just call me at 312 543 6915 if you have questions about showers because I could easily write another five pages on the subject, and almost all of you would either not read it or be really bored if you did. http://dlvr.it/8mmdBc

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Latest Blog Post: Bathrooms, part one of many: Here’s a quiz for you; how much does a toilet cost?  If you said $69 you’re right and if you said $1,000, you’re right too.  The bathroom probably has the widest variety of costs of any room in the house.  You can spend as little as $2,000 and as much as $50,000 redoing a small bathroom.   This blog was going to cover all the costs of renovating a bathroom, and then I was going to trim it down to only the design decisions.  Finally, I decided to just start with toilets and divide bathrooms into however many posts it takes to cover.  I know you love reading what I send out, but I doubt many of you want to read a 20-page blog about bathrooms.  So I’m starting with what may be your most basic decision; your toilet. There are a huge number of choices in every category that go into finishing a bathroom and they all have a corresponding variety of costs.  Starting with toilets, you have to decide if you want a two-piece or a sleeker one piece.  Do you want the traditional tank or a power flush, where the interior of the tank is sealed, and as you flush the air pressure increases the flushing power?  Do you need what they call comfort height, a slightly taller toilet that means you don’t have to squat quite as low as a traditional one? Do you dream of one of the Japanese computerized toilets that shoot out warm water and air?  Two-piece toilets start at under $60 and cost up to about $500, one-piece toilets cost between $300 and $1,000, and the computerized toilets cost between $3,000 and $7,000.  Before talking about what I like, here’s what I don’t like. My opinion is somewhat subjective and based on seeing real life toilet problems.  Three types of toilets I would avoid: the super cheap big box toilets, the power flush, and any toilet that has a lot of internal pipes.  The latter looks like there’s a snake sitting in the base.  The super cheap toilets use super cheap parts, so you can be pretty sure they’ll need repair within a couple of years.  The power flush toilets are very good, and can be a good option if you have kids.  I don’t like them because if you have a problem with them, the average homeowner can’t fix them.  You have to call a plumber because the interior, sealed tank hides all the parts.  Finally, the toilets that have internal pipes are easily clogged and are very difficult to clear. I personally like one-piece toilets.  I think they look better.  Expect to pay somewhere between $400 and $600 for a nice one-piece. Functionally, there’s no difference between one and two piece; it’s only design and appearance.  The Kohler two-piece toilet you pay $300 for will work just as well as the $1,000 Toto.  The difference is purely esthetic.   Of course, if you really love them, the do everything toilets are fun.  The seats heat up, they blow warm air on you, and will also shoot warm water.  Be prepared to spend extra for installation, however.  They require electric to be wired in to the toilet.  But if you’re spending $5,000 for a toilet, an extra $500 shouldn’t deter you. The bottom line here is the same as I say about all your design decisions.  Spend money on what matters to you.  If you could care less about how your toilet looks, buy a good quality two-piece toilet for $200 to $400.  You may want a taller toilet, you may want a round rather than elongated bowl, or you may want the option to have a half flush for liquids.  Decide what’s important to you and direct your designer or contractor on what you like.  Don’t leave it up to them to tell you what you need.  Most of them are going to push for a fancier, more expensive choice. Let them enumerate all the choices you have to make. You’re the one who’s going to spend time living with this purchase.  Make it a comfortable decision, or you’ll spend lots of time sitting and thinking you should have made a different one. http://dlvr.it/77MJlh

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Latest Blog Post: It’s not what you know; it’s who you know!: Almost every client with whom I work has a preconceived idea of how much things should cost and what rooms in their home should be improved, and the basis for their opinion comes mostly from their peers.  Everyone listens to their friends. Two interesting things arise from this reliance on friends.  Based on geography and socio economic circumstances, people’s perception of what things should cost vary wildly.  When I talk to friends or clients in an affluent suburb, they believe it’s impossible to do a kitchen renovation for less than $100,000.  When I talk with clients in less affluent neighborhoods, their perceptions for a kitchen renovation range from $10,000 (unrealistically low, but possible) to $50,000 (a nice kitchen, but not fancy enough for my ritzy friends). Whether you’re renovating or building a new house, here’s my first and most important advice for you.  Spend money on what’s important to you.  Don’t worry about what your friends think is important.  And, in general, don’t worry about ‘investing’ for a future sale.  Your best investment is making your home a better place for you to live. Very few people have unlimited resources, you have to decide where to allocate yours. Here’s more unsolicited advice from me.  First spend your money on maintenance and fundamental structural issues.  I’ve worked on several homes in the last year in which I was called in to address esthetic issues.  When I looked at the homes, I quickly advised my prospective clients to forget about design and worry about structure. And one final bit of advice; don’t worry about what your friends tell you.  It’s your house and your money.  I always suggest thinking about the things you’d most like to change and starting with those.  And with starting with spending the least money you can to get the most change. Coming up in future posts; exactly what you will have to spend for various improvements. http://dlvr.it/6r3y8k

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Latest Blog Post: I hate my kitchen, now what?: Perhaps the most common room in the house that people really hate, for esthetic or functional reasons, or both, is their kitchen.  In the city there are loads of condominiums with thirty year old galley kitchens.  In the suburbs there are a multitude of kitchens that just are not set up the way people want to live today.  Of course, it’s in the interest of everyone in the industry to tell you to gut everything and start over to create your dream kitchen.  I’m going to give you the opposite advice.   Here is some advice, in no particular order, based on experience with dozens of renovations. * Unless money is absolutely no object, start with trying to figure out what is the least you can do to change your kitchen that will give you what you want.  My father and his wife had a truly ugly kitchen.  When their house was built thirty years ago the developer installed light caramel glaze hickory cabinets with grey corian counter tops.  For five years they talked to me about a gut renovation, but I knew that they didn’t really want to spend the money or go through the hassle of a months long project.  And their kitchen layout was good..  I suggested they throw away the corian and replace them with granite that better matched the cabinets.  The work took a day, they spent about a fifth of what a total renovation would have cost, and their kitchen is beautiful. * Get expert advice first.  If you cannot stand the way your kitchen looks, but especially if you hate the way it’s laid out, find a great kitchen designer.  There are not that many of them, so if you are not thrilled with the design the first person gives you, go see another designer.  This is a specialized field, and the design is going to make or break your renovation, so demand satisfaction. * You get what you pay for.  Two weeks ago I went to see a brand new condo.  It was owned by the fiancé of the woman who called me.  She hated his kitchen cabinets, which were a medium brown stain, so they paid a friend to paint them ebony. He used a brush so you could see all the strokes on the doors.  For some inexplicable reason, he painted the doors a matte color and on the boxes (the cabinets themselves) he applied a high gloss polyurethane boat sealer, so the sheen was completely different than the doors. * Do what makes you happy and makes your home better for you.  It always surprises me when I talk to people who tell me they’ve lived in a house with a kitchen they hated for the last twenty years, and now they want to sell the house so they want to improve it.  Your house is not an investment per se.  You should not expect to make a profit on the money you put in.  The best investment you can make is in creating an environment that improves your life.  If you do that, you’ll find someone who appreciates what you’ve done and the house will sell faster. * Make your decisions in advance.  Whether you act as your own general contractor or hire an architect, think through everything and realize that everything should go together; the cabinets, countertop, hardware, sink, faucet, etc.  Most people are surprised to learn how many decisions have to be made.  It’s much better to make them in advance.  If you don’t, it will cost time, money or both. * Use the internet.  There are wonderful sites like Houzz that have hundred of thousands of photos.  These are today’s versions of House Beautiful magazine.  People create ideabooks online instead of clippings.  It’s a really easy way to communicate to your designer or builder what looks you like. * Stick to a classic look.  Right now it’s in vogue to mix light color cabinets with a darker color island.  Glass mosaic tiles are very popular for backsplashes.  If you love that look, install it.  But don’t be persuaded by anyone to do the currently popular look.  Your designer is going to renovate many more kitchens in the next few years, and they’ll be on to the next trend, but you will live with your kitchen for the next ten or twenty years. http://dlvr.it/5bJ4MV

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Latest Blog Post: Fear of fixing: Whether you are just buying a new faucet for your bathroom sink or planning a 4,000 square foot home addition, the results will depend on two things; the quality of the planning process before you start and the collaboration between you and your builder.  Few homeowners have the faintest idea of how to even begin planning.  They are stuck in the fear of fixing stage.  Here’s how to overcome your fear of fixing. The first thing I tell clients when we talk about a possible project is that their space should make them happy.  Forget about trying to figure out what future buyers of your home may value and don’t think of any renovation project as an investment.  Unless you’re a professional and you’re buying homes at less than 50% of the market rate in your neighborhood, you’re not making a financial investment.  You’re making a psychic investment.   Spend the money because you have it and it will make your house a better place to live.  If you make yourself happy, you’ll end up getting the best possible return on your investment because you will have enjoyed the space while you live there and buyers will appreciate the beautiful work you did.  While you may not realize a profit on the work you did, your house will sell faster and closer to your asking price than your neighbor’s unimproved home. Here’s the next step.  Do your homework.  You may not know enough to plan and execute a successful home renovation, but you can look at magazines and websites like Houzz to figure out how you want your house to look.  You can go to websites like faucet.com to choose bathroom faucets.  You can take a couple of hours to go to a tile store to get an idea of the type of tile you like.  If you’re thinking of renovating a kitchen, bring in a kitchen designer.  If you commit to buying cabinets from them, they will do a design free of charge.  (You can reimburse them for their time if you don’t buy from them.)  If you’re doing anything structural, talk to an architect or general contractor before you start planning.  They can tell you if walls can be moved, and what the best use of space is.  I know you don’t want to talk to anyone that’s going to cost money, so you can always wait, but sometimes the earliest money spent is the best money.  You’ll find out what you can actually do to the building and you should get space planning ideas that you would never come up with yourself.  Even though it will take time, you’ll have more confidence and a sense of direction once you’ve started to educate yourself.   Step two: hire the right people.  I learned the hard way in this business that the cheapest contractor is not the best value.  The one who does the best quality work for a fair price is the best value.  It isn’t cheap if the quality of the work isn’t satisfactory.  Over the years I’ve made up a lot of business sayings.  One of them is- you don’t always get what you paid for, but you almost never get what you didn’t pay for.  When you talk to anyone with whom you might work, ask them for references.  You might never call the people, but they should at least be able to give you people to call.  Ask for photos of their work.  Most important, talk to them.   Do you feel comfortable with their answers to your questions?  Do they sound like they know what they’re doing?  Do you think they have good taste?  This is the most important decision you’re going to make in the whole project. You’re entrusting the outcome of a remodel to the contractor’s competence and taste level.  The work you do is going to be a total collaboration with the contractor.  He’s going to take your place apart and put it back together again.  Listen to your gut and listen to your head.  Do the numbers make sense?  Does the construction approach sound good to you?  Does the timeline sound realistic?  If one guy tells you a job will take two weeks and one guy says it will take four weeks, let them each explain.  You’re not stupid.  If something sounds too good to be true, it is.   Third step: define the process and make sure that you and the contractor are on the same page.  A verbal agreement isn’t worth the paper it’s written on.  Your expectations should be clearly spelled out and his or her construction goals clearly defined.  There is some surprise every time a wall is opened.  Some unscrupulous contractors rely on change orders generated by surprises to the homeowner to make lots of extra money.   Ask what the possible surprises could be and what they might cost.  Make sure the builder tells you what they’re doing, in what order, and how long it will take.  And make sure what they’re saying makes sense to you.  You may not know anything about building, but you’re smart enough to understand anything that’s explained clearly.  If they can’t explain everything in a way that you can fully grasp it, maybe they don’t know enough about renovation. Finally: keep an eye on things, it’s your house and you’ll be there far longer than the builder.  If you see something that doesn’t look right, ask about it right away.  The job should not be complete until you’re happy.  A good builder wants to make you happy. I hope all this advice helps you overcome your fear of fixing.  And go visit my website at www.m5chicago.com and my facebook page at Mfive Chicago.  Always feel free to drop me a note at Robert@m5chicago.com if you have any questions. http://dlvr.it/4SWtKW

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Latest Blog Post: Kitchen counter tops: so many choices, so much confusion.: In the beginning there was wood. And it was good for thousands of years and it still is. For some people there’s nothing better than a butcher block counter top in at least part of their kitchen. It’s warm, beautiful, can be used to knead dough or cut meat and vegetables. They do require maintenance. You have to keep them really clean, which might require some scraping or sanding, and you have to season the butcher block with a food safe oil like mineral oil.. And then in 1912, two engineers working for Westinghouse invented laminate. And they named it Formica. They immediately left the company and presumably got very rich. This much maligned material is familiar to everyone and wanted by no one. It’s the least expensive countertop and is easy to clean. Its worst feature is that it is very heat sensitive, so it’s relatively easy to ruin. Stainless steel made the jump from restaurant kitchens to homes in the 1960s and is again somewhat popular. The good; no need to worry about heat or food stains. The bad; it’s easy to scratch and dent so either you don’t mind that look or you have to be very careful. Sometimes you will see tile counter tops. I hate these because I think they’re ugly, the tile can chip, and the grout between the tiles easily stains and can mildew, even if it’s sealed. Starting in the 1960s granite was the most desirable counter top material.. While its reign as the champion of counter tops is over, there’s a lot to like about it. It’s very durable, hard to stain, easy to maintain and can withstand heat.. Nowadays there are signs on the side of the street promoting granite at $24 a square foot (not accurate because they charge extra for every cut), so granite is seen today as a low end commodity by lots of homeowners. But there are good reasons it was the most desired material for fifty years. About ten years ago designers started using marble in the kitchen . There’s no doubt that there are some stunning marbles. Colors like Calcutta Gold and Statuary, with lots of white and distinctive veining, command premium prices. I’ve used it in four homes that sold for well over a million dollars each. My theory is that the more people pay for a house, the less cooking they do. I say that because marble is soft and permeable, so it’s easy to chip or stain and almost impossible to remove the stains. Don’t put your water glass on your new marble counters! Of all the choices, people are most confused by quartz. It’s a man made material, but it’s made from 93% quartz, a natural mineral. People who like it praise its low maintenance- it doesn’t require any sealing like natural stone does- and they like the fact that the color usually goes all the way through the material.. Because it’s manmade, what you see is what you get, there’s no variation in the look of the material between the sample you see and the delivery you get. People who don’t like it point out that it can chip more easily than granite and that it doesn’t look natural. To make things more confusing, there are dozens of quartz manufacturers, with conflicting marketing claims. Some of the better known brands are Zodiaq, Cambria, Caesarstone, and Silestone. Concrete has moved out of your driveway and in to your kitchen. A few years ago there was lots of hype in the trade magazines about concrete counters, but I think it will always have a very limited market. A good installer can dye or texture your counters to give them almost any look. That’s the good news. The bad news is that you are really at the mercy of your installer because everything depends on the quality of your installation. Also, concrete tends to crack over time and it needs to be sealed. The penetrating sealers that are needed to provide heat resistance have to be reapplied regularly. A material that’s not for everyone. By far the best known solid surface counter top is Corian. This was considered a premium counter top material in the seventies and eighties. I could say enough said, but I won’t. Corian, I think, is really much better in the bathroom than the kitchen because it can be made with a seamless appearance. For kitchens the good news is that, until you get to the wood core, the solid surface material is the same color thoughout and requires no maintenance. The bad news is that it’s not heat resistant and it’s been my experience that it discolors over time. Porcelain counter tops are quite popular in Europe, but rarely used here. These are basically a very thin layer of porcelain veneer over a sandwich of fiberglass, MDF, and wood. They are lightweight and offer lots of looks and colors. But they are easy to break when installing them and difficult to find. I only know of one distributor in Chicago and they bring them in from Europe. I didn’t mention glass, bamboo, recycled glass, lava stone, and recycled countertops. These are such a small part of the market that they don’t warrant devoting space to them, but they might appeal to you. http://dlvr.it/44z3CL

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Latest Blog Post: What to look at when buying a new home Or How to be your own home inspector (at least a little): At this moment I’m involved with two homes that have expensive problems. They have a number of things in common. Both of them were purchased in the last six months by young couples as a first home after living in a condominium apartment. Both the homes are at least fifty years old. Both the homes were thoroughly inspected by ‘professional’ home inspectors. Both homes have structural issues that will cost more than $25,000 to fix. And the structural issues would definitely have been spotted and flagged by an experienced builder, architect or structural engineer. What went wrong? In both homes, either the home inspection missed the problems altogether or noted the problems and didn’t raise a red flag so the buyers had no clue it was important. Probably the inspector didn’t realize it either. The majority of home inspectors have some background in building, but don’t understand buildings like engineers or architects. They take a class in inspection, follow a rote approach to each building, and usually issue a lengthy report with lots of pictures to support each comment. As a builder I find their approach to be great at catching lots of minor problems but they are often not equipped in knowledge or method for seeing some serious issues. So what should you do? I do think you should get a home inspection, flawed as they may be. You want to know if one of the electric outlets doesn’t work or if the furnace is rusting. But I’d urge you, if you’re looking at an older house, a new construction home with no history, or have any reason at all for serious concern, to pay an architect or engineer to come look at the potential purchase. They may charge $500 just to look and give you a verbal report, but it could be the best money you ever spent. Before you decide to hire a professional, look at the house with a dispassionate eye. Start in the basement and go to the roof. It’s beyond the scope of a blog post to tell you everything to look for, but use common sense. In the basement, is the floor completely level and are there cracks in the floors or walls? Look at the support beams and posts in the basement. If they are wood, are there cracks? Do you smell dampness? Do you see any water stains? Look at the furnace and water heater. Do they look like they’re in good condition? Look at all the floors and walls throughout the house. Are they level? If there are wood floors, are there gaps? Does the drywall on the ceilings look perfect or can you see the tape coming through? Caution- problems in the walls and ceilings can easily be covered by a decent paint job. Look at the windows and doors. Do they all open easily and smoothly? Walk around the outside of the house. Look where the dirt touches the foundation walls. Do you see any cracks in the wall? Look at the brick around the house; make sure the mortar isn’t cracked. Look at the chimney and make sure it’s straight and has no cracks. Look at the shingles on the roof. They should look flat, with no ripples. If you’re buying a house in the city with a flat roof, just assume it needs to be reroofed and will cost at least $15,000. Since you are already emotionally invested in this home, maybe you should invite a friend to walk through with you. Neither of you is trying to take the place of a professional inspection. Follow your gut. If something doesn’t feel right, call me or call an architect or engineer. The biggest things to look for are water damage and structural issues. The place to really concentrate is the basement. It’s the place most home buyers ignore because they fall in love with the rest of the home, but it’s also the place where you’ll find clues to the most serious problems. Both water issues and structural defects show up here. People have written books on this subject, so this can only be a brief guide, but I wish I had a dollar for every time a client or friend told me that they hired a home inspector with twenty years experience and can’t understand how they missed this problem. You’re not going to take the place of an engineer, but you can definitely use your eyes and your nose to spot problems that might be major issues. Don’t be intimidated; after all, you’ve lived someplace your whole life, and you know the problems in the places you’ve lived. Now go look at this home and pretend it’s one you’ve lived in. You may find you know just where to look. http://dlvr.it/3zNw7R

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Mount Prospect IL Bathroom Remodeling: Your bathroom is the most private, intimate space in your home and it should reflect your lifestyle. Whatever your budget, and whatever the size of the bathroom, we will work with you to make sure that it changes into a space that will delight you.  It’s where you begin and end your day; you should have an environment that you enjoy. We have designed hundreds of bathrooms as real estate developers and designers, and know how to optimize your space and your money. Bathroom design is all about making the best use of a relatively small space, and choosing the appliances and materials that create your perfect environment. For a small space, bathrooms require a ridiculous number of choices; tile for the walls, tile for the floor, bath faucets, whirlpool or air tub, toilet, medicine cabinets, vanity design, mirrors, glass for the tub or shower enclosure, countertop material, paint, and bath hardware.  In addition to making selections that reflect the functionality you want, everything has to work and look good together. Because we have design, development, and construction expertise, we work with you to help you create your perfect bathroom. If you have lots of space with which to work, we measure and create the best layout for all the luxuries you want to incorporate .  If you have a very small space, we advise you on how to maximize what you’ve got and make a beautiful, comfortable bath. We will help you from start to finish in creating a beautiful bath.  We can help you design, introduce you to kitchen and bath designers,  or work with your designer.  We will help you make the hundreds of decisions you need to make in renovating a bathroom, and we will handle all the construction for you; from the plumbing to the tile, and from the lighting to the bath hardware.  When we’re done, everything you hoped for will be a reality. http://www.m5chicago.com/RSSRetrieve.aspx?ID=20267&A=Link&ObjectID=6222521&ObjectType=35&O=http%253a%252f%252fwww.m5chicago.com%252fcity%252fmount-prospect-il-bathroom-remodeling

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Mount Prospect IL Kitchen Remodeling: We have designed hundreds of kitchens as real estate developers and designers, and know how to optimize your space and your money. The Mfive Way * Free consultation with a real local person * Total commitment to getting your desired kitchen within your budget * Simple approach * Emphasis on both the design & the build * Quality workmanship http://www.m5chicago.com/RSSRetrieve.aspx?ID=20267&A=Link&ObjectID=6222523&ObjectType=35&O=http%253a%252f%252fwww.m5chicago.com%252fcity%252fmount-prospect-il-kitchen-remodeling

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Mount Prospect IL Home Remodeling: When it comes to home improvement, we've done it all! We can remodel your kitchen, completely change your bathrooms, add skylights, fix your roof, remove walls and open up your rooms, put in hardwood flooring, add radiant heating to your floors, replace or rebuild your windows, put in new gutters, or install a new roof. Mfive Chicago takes pride in our home remodeling and renovation services. We have helped city dwellers like you turn their ordinary homes into something they are proud to show off. Whatever your budget, and whatever the size of your home, we will work with you to make sure that it changes into a space that will delight you. You spend most of your life their, shouldn't it be an environment that you enjoy? http://www.m5chicago.com/RSSRetrieve.aspx?ID=20267&A=Link&ObjectID=6222522&ObjectType=35&O=http%253a%252f%252fwww.m5chicago.com%252fcity%252fmount-prospect-il-home-remodeling
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