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Lucas Wiman
Works at Counsyl
Attended UIUC
Lives in Mountain View, CA
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The brain is bizarrely adaptive even if you do something as crude as just tossing two electrodes into it with a coherent signal pattern on them: "Researchers at Tokyo University have added a new sense to the brains of rats. The procedure was relatively simple and the rats integrated the new sense — a geomagnetic compass — quickly ... were soon able to navigate laboratory mazes ... We arbitrarily inserted two electrodes into the visual cortex. The locations of stimulation seemed unlikely to be important ... geomagnetic sensor device was designed to connect a digital compass ... used normally in smart phones"
Researchers at Tokyo University have added a new sense to the brains of rats. The proceedure was relatively simple and the rats integrated the new sense
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Nice writeup on this exploit using forced non-random memory errors. Includes good quotes on why this exploit is technically impressive and why this is going to be difficult to block (as it is an attack breaking the assumption that memory errors are random in the massive installed base of DRAM hardware). We're probably going to see a whole series of attacks based on this technique in the coming years.
"Rowhammer" attack goes where few exploits have gone before, into silicon itself.
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Weird solutions to planar Newtonian n-body problems...roll your own at http://gminton.org/#choreo or read https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N-body_choreography for more info.
James Montaldi, Choreographies, Dynamics, Symmetry
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This is hardly the first attempt to apply neural networks to the game Go, but this result seems noteworthy: "Our convolutional neural networks can consistently defeat the well known Go program GNU Go, indicating it is state of the art among programs that do not use Monte Carlo Tree Search. It is also able to win some games against state of the art Go playing program Fuego while using a fraction of the play time"

Here's a bit on their motivation: "Human Go experts rely heavily on pattern recognition when playing Go. Expert players can gain strong intuitions about what parts of the board will fall under whose control and what are the best moves to consider at a glance, and without needing to mentally simulate possible future positions. This provides a sharp contrast to typical computer Go algorithms, which simulate thousands of possible future positions and make minimal use of pattern recognition. This gives us reason to think that developing pattern recognition algorithms for Go might be the missing element needed to close the performance gap between computers and humans. In particular for Go, pattern recognition systems could provide ways to combat the high branching factor because it might be possible to prune out many possible moves based on patterns in the current position. This would result in a system that analyzes Go in a much more ‘human like’ manner, eliminating most candidate moves based on learned patterns within the board and then ‘thinking ahead’ only for the remaining, more promising moves."
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John von Neumann on how failure precautions shape systems.

"If you look at automata which have been built by men or which exist in nature you will very frequently notice that their structure is controlled to a much larger extent by the manner in which they might fail and by the (more or less effective) precautionary measures which have been taken against their failure. And to say that they are precautions against failure is to overstate the case, to use an optimistic terminology which is completely alien to the subject. Rather than precautions against failure, they are arrangements by which it is attempted to achieve a state where at least a majority of all failures will not be lethal. There can be no question of eliminating failures or of completely paralyzing the effects of failures. All we can try to do is to arrange an automaton so that in the vast majority of failures it can continue to operate. These arrangements give palliatives of failures, not cures. Most of the arrangements of artificial and natural automata and the principles involved therein are of this sort."

Quoted in General Systems Thinking by Gerald Weinberg
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Structural hypotheses on the decline in auto use include the rise of Internet services, which make getting in a car to hang out a less satisfying proposition. While you could argue that in-person is better, it's not better at every margin; you no longer need physical presence to chat idly and being present might create commitments neither party really cares for.

I'm skeptical of "transit-oriented" vis-a-vis "traffic-oriented". The bus may be inconvenient, but I can browse the Internet and chat while on it in a way I cannot in a car. It is not uncommon for me to give up a lot of travel time so I can have higher quality time on a train or bus. If driving is unpleasant and will take a long time regardless, sitting on a bus or train a bit longer but with the ability to read and chat is a lot more attractive.

Most of the middle class doesn't think this way, but I've never had patience with their status-signaling.
Between 2001 and 2009, the average yearly number of miles driven by 16- to 34-year-olds dropped a staggering 23 percent.
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How cool!  Watching the behavior od stars and gasses in collisions of clusters of galaxies… and using gravitational lensing to measure the dark matter… enables astronomers to learn something fundamental about the nature of dark matter.  
When clusters of galaxies collide, their dark matter doesn't interact in the way that matter containing protons does, say scientists.
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Why were the Snowden leaks such a shock for the security community? An impressive commitment to secrecy and techniques for deniability and misdirection. (I particularly like the exfiltration technique using passive collection.)
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Yeah, this. I'm not going snap, crackle, pop -- yet -- but I know it's coming.
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Have him in circles
125 people
Francis Cleary's profile photo
kapil sharma's profile photo
Prashanth Puthillath's profile photo
Justine Lam's profile photo
Martin Lefebvre's profile photo
Tomasz Malisiewicz's profile photo
Azad Amir-Ghassemi's profile photo
Phần mềm quản lý bán hàng's profile photo
Will Ma's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Software developer
Employment
  • Counsyl
    2013 - present
  • http://www.connexive.com
    Software developer, 2011 - 2013
  • wize.com
  • nextag.com
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Currently
Mountain View, CA
Previously
Normal, IL - Urbana, IL
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Software engineer
Introduction
I have a BS (2007) and an MS (2009) in mathematics, both from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 
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  • UIUC
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