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Lucas Appelmann
22,267 followers -
GNU Terry Pratchett
GNU Terry Pratchett

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That's why I'm doing this. Just trying.

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Heat Broils the American Southwest

Hot temperatures are a fact of life in the American Southwest, but the sweltering heat that baked the region in mid-June was anything but routine.

With a large ridge of high pressure lingering over the region, sweltering temperatures neared and, in some cases, surpassed heat records. Power companies faced record demand for electricity. Dozens of flights were grounded. Some people even died because of the heat.

In Phoenix, Arizona, temperatures hit 119 degrees Fahrenheit (48 degrees Celsius). In Palm Springs, California, the high was 122°F degrees. In Las Vegas, Nevada, temperatures peaked at 117°F. Needles, California, tied its all-time high with a temperature of 125°F.

The first map shows the heat wave as observed by satellite on June 21, 2017. Note that it depicts land surface temperatures (LSTs), not air temperatures. LSTs reflect how hot the surface of the Earth would feel to the touch in a particular location, and they can sometimes be significantly hotter or cooler than air temperatures. (To learn more about LSTs and air temperatures, read: "Where is the Hottest Place on Earth?" https://go.nasa.gov/2rZjawE )

The second map shows land surface temperatures between June 15—21, 2017, compared to average temperatures for the same period from 2001–2010. The anomalies are based on land surface temperatures observed by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite. Red areas were hotter than the long-term average, while blue areas were below average. White pixels had normal temperatures, and gray pixels did not have enough data, most likely due to cloud cover.

The scope and the duration of the heat wave has been unusual. Broad swaths of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico all felt the heat. With extreme temperatures in the forecast for a few more days, some cities may break all-time heat wave duration records.

The National Weather Service reminds people dealing with extreme heat to drink plenty of water, limit outdoor activity, and wear loose and light-colored clothing. NWS suggests checking in on the sick, elderly, and those who do not have air conditioning; they also caution that children and pets should never be left alone in hot vehicles, even for a brief period.

https://go.nasa.gov/2rYXTUa

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“One of the best illustrations of ante-bellum Texas and New Mexico”, 1857

The first edition of a remarkable, separately-issued military map of Texas and the eastern part of New Mexico.

This is one of several regional maps of the Western United States prepared by the Bureau of Topographical Engineers prior to the Civil War. They were not published per se but rather printed in very small numbers for use only by senior officers, undoubtedly to reduce the chance they might be obtained by hostile powers. Due to this limited distribution, all are now exceedingly scarce.
The map includes very detailed treatments of existing and proposed rail and road systems in the region, along with the rivers, lakes, springs, creeks, crossings, water holes, Indian trails, pioneer routes, towns, camps, forts, ranches and other features of potential military significance. A table at lower right provides the exact longitude and latitude for 30 major military stations in the region, along with the surveyors by whom the coordinates were established.
The map was compiled from the best and latest available information, as demonstrated by the “List of Authorities” at lower left. The list includes maps by Johnston, Michler, Emory, Kearny, Abert, Simpson, Marcy, Whipple, Wool, Graham, Macomb and others, some dated as late as 1857, the very year the present map was printed. Most had not previously been published, and some, such as that by Macomb, would not be issued until after the Civil War. Interestingly, De Cordova’s Map of Texas is also cited as a source for the depiction of the eastern part of the state. The wealth and quality of the sources, and the apparent care with which they are compiled, justify Reese’s view that it is “a most important map, one of the best illustrations of ante-bellum Texas and New Mexico,” (Catalog 126, #346) along with Michael Heaston’s assessment that “This is one map which Union officers would not have wanted the Confederacy to use.” (Catalog 27, #195)

The map is sufficiently rare that Martin & Martin list only a reduced edition published as plate LIV in the Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (1891-5). Though unaware that the map had been published, Martin & Martin nonetheless appear to refer to its use during the Civil War:

“Shortly after assuming command of the Gulf in 1862 and while planning his offensives in New Orleans, [Nathaniel] Banks dispatched a report to Washington containing a map of the Texas region. The map had been prepared from various sources shortly before the war, and it was an excellent example of a military planning document…. The focus of the map was clearly on military considerations…. Though drawn originally in 1857 and utilized by Banks in 1862, the map was not published until the 1880s [sic], when it appeared in the Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies.”

In all, a rare and important Texas map.

See the details: http://bostonraremaps.com/inventory/topographical-engineers-texas-new-mexico/

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After quite some time, something worthy of being posted to this collection.

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It's one of Miguel Covarrubias' great maps that distills the diversity and history of the U.S. A great visual summary from 1942. #pictorialmaps #oldmaps #oldmapgallery 
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#GeoawesomeMapOfTheDay This map shows where nighttime lights have increased (in blue) and dimmed (in pink) between 2012 and 2016
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It took more than 25 years to build this incredible walkable world map http://onest.mp/2t8RLVv
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