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Dr. Louis Surace Pediatric Dentistry
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Electric toothbrushes can be great for children just beginning to brush on their own. They have built-in timers, which helps ensure that they brush for at least two minutes. Additionally, many kids enjoy them more than manual toothbrushes. #DentalFAQ
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The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that parents choose a dental home for their child before their first birthday. By doing so, you can get your child’s oral health evaluated at the earliest possible stage, and make informed, mouth-healthy decisions as they welcome more baby teeth. #ToothLove
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Here’s a couple of do’s and don’ts to maintain a healthy smile: Do: brush your teeth twice per day for at least 2 minutes at a time. Don’t: drink a lot of sugary drinks like colas and fruit juice. Do: floss your teeth daily, to remove debris from between teeth. Don’t: eat a lot of sticky or hard candy, which can damage enamel. #DentalFAQ
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Your child needs a new toothbrush every three months. When choosing the best toothbrush for your child, make sure the handle fits in their hand and the head should easily fit in their mouth. Make sure that you buy a toothbrush with soft, rounded bristles, and always check for the ADA seal of approval. #ToothLove
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Did you know that the mouthguard was invented in 1890? Woolf Krause, a London dentist, developed what he called a “gum shield” made of cotton, tape, sponge and small pieces of wood to protect boxers from lip lacerations and mouth injuries.
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Children often suck their thumb for comfort in stressful situations, or to deal with anxiety. Thumb sucking usually persists from ages 2 – 4, but can last longer. If you’re worried about your child’s thumb sucking habit, try positive reinforcement to help them kick the habit. If it persists, visit our office for more advice. #DentalFAQ
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Some families limit candy to a certain number of pieces every day, while others allow a "free-for-all" for a few of days after Halloween. Whatever you decide, make sure your kids are brushing for 2 minutes, twice every day! Does your family have any candy rules? #CandyRules #ToothLove
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As your child gets older, it is alright to start slowly giving them sugary foods. To keep sugar-related cavities at bay, make sure that they finish sugary treats quickly, and that they rinse their mouth out with cool water after they’re done. Limit candy, and only fill sippy cups with water to limit the time that sugar contacts their teeth. #ToothLove
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Some people discount the importance of baby teeth since they are temporary. However, baby teeth are vital in developing a properly structured smile in adulthood. If a baby tooth is lost too soon, it can lead to crowding of adult teeth, which can negatively affect bite alignment. The bottom line is that you should care for your child’s baby teeth as if they were adult teeth to help them get a healthy smile that lasts into adulthood. #DentalFAQ
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Everybody loves sweets, but sugar is bad for teeth and it can lead to plaque buildup and cavities. But don’t let the bad side of sugar get you down. You can replace sugar with a natural sweetener called Xylitol, which can actually reduce plaque and reduce enamel-attacking acid! #DentalFAQ #DentalScience
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