Profile

Cover photo
Loris Guignard
Works at Gowento
Attended ENSIIE
Lives in San Francisco, US
2,615 followers|32,977 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
Gmail's new look. Posted by Jason Cornwell, User Experience Designer Back in July we showed you a preview of Gmail's new look, and we've been working this summer to make even more updates ...
3
Mohamed Gastli's profile photowilfrid mongo's profile photo
2 comments
 
Sisi
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Google+ has Klout ...
Klout Blog on how to understand and measure online influence
1
Rohan Sharma's profile photo
 
api's in action
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Vic Gundotra originally shared:
 
Icon Ambulance

One Sunday morning, January 6th, 2008 I was attending religious services when my cell phone vibrated. As discreetly as possible, I checked the phone and noticed that my phone said "Caller ID unknown". I choose to ignore.

After services, as I was walking to my car with my family, I checked my cell phone messages. The message left was from Steve Jobs. "Vic, can you call me at home? I have something urgent to discuss" it said.

Before I even reached my car, I called Steve Jobs back. I was responsible for all mobile applications at Google, and in that role, had regular dealings with Steve. It was one of the perks of the job.

"Hey Steve - this is Vic", I said. "I'm sorry I didn't answer your call earlier. I was in religious services, and the caller ID said unknown, so I didn't pick up".

Steve laughed. He said, "Vic, unless the Caller ID said 'GOD', you should never pick up during services".

I laughed nervously. After all, while it was customary for Steve to call during the week upset about something, it was unusual for him to call me on Sunday and ask me to call his home. I wondered what was so important?

"So Vic, we have an urgent issue, one that I need addressed right away. I've already assigned someone from my team to help you, and I hope you can fix this tomorrow" said Steve.

"I've been looking at the Google logo on the iPhone and I'm not happy with the icon. The second O in Google doesn't have the right yellow gradient. It's just wrong and I'm going to have Greg fix it tomorrow. Is that okay with you?"

Of course this was okay with me. A few minutes later on that Sunday I received an email from Steve with the subject "Icon Ambulance". The email directed me to work with Greg Christie to fix the icon.

Since I was 11 years old and fell in love with an Apple II, I have dozens of stories to tell about Apple products. They have been a part of my life for decades. Even when I worked for 15 years for Bill Gates at Microsoft, I had a huge admiration for Steve and what Apple had produced.

But in the end, when I think about leadership, passion and attention to detail, I think back to the call I received from Steve Jobs on a Sunday morning in January. It was a lesson I'll never forget. CEOs should care about details. Even shades of yellow. On a Sunday.

To one of the greatest leaders I've ever met, my prayers and hopes are with you Steve.

-Vic
5
6
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Greplin Releases Must Have iPhone App To Organize Your Life
greplin. Login; Register; Reset password. Login to Greplin: E-Mail: Password: Register for Greplin: E-Mail: Password: good. Confirm Password: Forgot your password? Enter your email to continue: E-Mail...
2
Nassim Ghandour's profile photoEdouard Schlumberger's profile photoLoris Guignard's profile photo
4 comments
 
Tout se fait en OAuth, jamais besoin de lacher un password. Après pour le contenu de tes données, oui, ils peuvent avoir accès à a tes emails, tout comme Google d'ailleurs.
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Micaël Reynaud originally shared:
 
Morphed from Martin Schoeller portraits.
10
11
Fabien JOURNÉ's profile photoBastien Hubervic-Renard's profile photo
2 comments
 
Ca piquouille les yeux, mais c'est fou ce qu'on peut faire avec un GIF (de 9Mo) :)
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Décidément, il ne fait pas bon être utilisateur Android et Internet Explorer dans les études ces temps-ci
 ·  Translate
1
Mehdi Fekih's profile photo
 
pas forcément, c'est juste pas des hispters
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Like.
3
Olivier El Mekki's profile photoAna Gabriela Rodriguez Csiky's profile photo
2 comments
 
Nous sommes, heureusement, loin du monde de 1984 où le Newspeak efface des mots du dictionnaire. Quoique nous pouvons homogéniser, nous sommes de plus en plus à s'intéresser par le net à ce qui se passe au-delà des frontières de nos pays et justement refuser les préconçus qui dictent les normes dans nos pays.

Autant j'adore Orwell pour la richesse de la réflection je ne peux pas +1/Liker l'association entre le +1 de Facebook et le Newspeak de 1984.
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
2,615 people
paolo floris's profile photo
Sébastien Moulène's profile photo
Sharon Shimony's profile photo
Pierre-Alain Mondello's profile photo
Jean-Francois Côté's profile photo
tazi energies urbaines's profile photo
Etienne Bisson's profile photo
Julien Blanchard's profile photo
Stéphane GEMMANI's profile photo

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Guy Kawasaki originally shared:
 
(Sat01) What I Learned From Steve Jobs

Many people have explained what one can learn from Steve Jobs. But few, if any, of these people have been inside the tent and experienced first hand what it was like to work with him. I don’t want any lessons to be lost or forgotten, so here is my list of the top twelve lessons that I learned from Steve Jobs.

Experts are clueless.

Experts—journalists, analysts, consultants, bankers, and gurus can’t “do” so they “advise.” They can tell you what is wrong with your product, but they cannot make a great one. They can tell you how to sell something, but they cannot sell it themselves. They can tell you how to create great teams, but they only manage a secretary. For example, the experts told us that the two biggest shortcomings of Macintosh in the mid 1980s was the lack of a daisy-wheel printer driver and Lotus 1-2-3; another advice gem from the experts was to buy Compaq. Hear what experts say, but don’t always listen to them.

Customers cannot tell you what they need.

“Apple market research” is an oxymoron. The Apple focus group was the right hemisphere of Steve’s brain talking to the left one. If you ask customers what they want, they will tell you, “Better, faster, and cheaper”—that is, better sameness, not revolutionary change. They can only describe their desires in terms of what they are already using—around the time of the introduction of Macintosh, all people said they wanted was better, faster, and cheaper MS-DOS machines. The richest vein for tech startups is creating the product that you want to use—that’s what Steve and Woz did.

Jump to the next curve.

Big wins happen when you go beyond better sameness. The best daisy-wheel printer companies were introducing new fonts in more sizes. Apple introduced the next curve: laser printing. Think of ice harvesters, ice factories, and refrigerator companies. Ice 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0. Are you still harvesting ice during the winter from a frozen pond?

The biggest challenges beget best work.

I lived in fear that Steve would tell me that I, or my work, was crap. In public. This fear was a big challenge. Competing with IBM and then Microsoft was a big challenge. Changing the world was a big challenge. I, and Apple employees before me and after me, did their best work because we had to do our best work to meet the big challenges.

Design counts.

Steve drove people nuts with his design demands—some shades of black weren’t black enough. Mere mortals think that black is black, and that a trash can is a trash can. Steve was such a perfectionist—a perfectionist Beyond: Thunderdome—and lo and behold he was right: some people care about design and many people at least sense it. Maybe not everyone, but the important ones.

You can’t go wrong with big graphics and big fonts.

Take a look at Steve’s slides. The font is sixty points. There’s usually one big screenshot or graphic. Look at other tech speaker’s slides—even the ones who have seen Steve in action. The font is eight points, and there are no graphics. So many people say that Steve was the world’s greatest product introduction guy..don’t you wonder why more people don’t copy his style?

Changing your mind is a sign of intelligence.

When Apple first shipped the iPhone there was no such thing as apps. Apps, Steve decreed, were a bad thing because you never know what they could be doing to your phone. Safari web apps were the way to go until six months later when Steve decided, or someone convinced Steve, that apps were the way to go—but of course. Duh! Apple came a long way in a short time from Safari web apps to “there’s an app for that.”

“Value” is different from “price.”

Woe unto you if you decide everything based on price. Even more woe unto you if you compete solely on price. Price is not all that matters—what is important, at least to some people, is value. And value takes into account training, support, and the intrinsic joy of using the best tool that’s made. It’s pretty safe to say that no one buys Apple products because of their low price.

A players hire A+ players.

Actually, Steve believed that A players hire A players—that is people who are as good as they are. I refined this slightly—my theory is that A players hire people even better than themselves. It’s clear, though, that B players hire C players so they can feel superior to them, and C players hire D players. If you start hiring B players, expect what Steve called “the bozo explosion” to happen in your organization.

Readl CEOs demo.

Steve Jobs could demo a pod, pad, phone, and Mac two to three times a year with millions of people watching, why is it that many CEOs call upon their vice-president of engineering to do a product demo? Maybe it’s to show that there’s a team effort in play. Maybe. It’s more likely that the CEO doesn’t understand what his/her company is making well enough to explain it. How pathetic is that?

Real CEOs ship.

For all his perfectionism, Steve could ship. Maybe the product wasn’t perfect every time, but it was almost always great enough to go. The lesson is that Steve wasn’t tinkering for the sake of tinkering—he had a goal: shipping and achieving worldwide domination of existing markets or creation of new markets. Apple is an engineering-centric company, not a research-centric one. Which would you rather be: Apple or Xerox PARC?

Marketing boils down to providing unique value.

Think of a 2 x 2 matrix. The vertical axis measures how your product differs from the competition. The horizontal axis measures the value of your product. Bottom right: valuable but not unique—you’ll have to compete on price. Top left: unique but not valuable—you’ll own a market that doesn’t exist. Bottom left: not unique and not value—you’re a bozo. Top right: unique and valuable—this is where you make margin, money, and history. For example, the iPod was unique and valuable because it was the only way to legally, inexpensively, and easily download music from the six biggest record labels.

Bonus: Some things need to be believed to be seen. When you are jumping curves, defying/ignoring the experts, facing off against big challenges, obsessing about design, and focusing on unique value, you will need to convince people to believe in what you are doing in order to see your efforts come to fruition. People needed to believe in Macintosh to see it become real. Ditto for iPod, iPhone, and iPad. Not everyone will believe—that’s okay. But the starting point of changing the world is changing a few minds. This is the greatest lesson of all that I learned from Steve.
1
1
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Microsoft semble fier de dévoiler la nouvelle UI de l'explorer de Windows 8. Ignoble.
Building Windows 8. An inside look from the Windows engineering team. Language. Français. Deutsch. Português (Brasil). 한국어. 日本語. 简体中文. Русский. Common tasks. Blog Home; Email Blog Author; RSS for post...
4
Antoine Pelisse's profile photoLoris Guignard's profile photoPierre-Eric Boulland's profile photo
9 comments
 
Le plus drôle c'est de voir que seul 4% vont utiliser tout ça...
Chez Apple ils foutent tout dans un menu déroulant, c'est super simple :)
Surtout que là, on va chercher à chaque fois où se trouvent les outils... et du coup on va revenir au clavier et au clic droit.

C'est marrant, c'était Apple qui n'aimait pas le clic droit car on ne savait pas si il y avait quelque chose derrière... et maintenant c'est Crosoft qui veut tout afficher pour éviter le clic droit.
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Playing video games on a Macbook Pro.
6
3
Gauthier Pitois's profile photoWill Ho's profile photoNithin Prabhakar's profile photo
3 comments
 
lol
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
On dirait bien que Facebook bloque les liens d'invitation à Google+. Clever basterds.
 ·  Translate
3
6
Romain Follet's profile photoNoël Bardelot's profile photomaiano guillaume's profile photo
3 comments
 
C'est pas tout à fait comme si tu arrivais dans un restaurant avec ton sandwich, plutôt comme si le restaurant interdisait les appels/sms de copains qui sont dans le restaurant d'à côté...
Add a comment...

Loris Guignard

Shared publicly  - 
 
a G+ meme. Share it.
Chris Messina originally shared:
 
a G+ meme: Share it.
2
5
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
2,615 people
paolo floris's profile photo
Sébastien Moulène's profile photo
Sharon Shimony's profile photo
Pierre-Alain Mondello's profile photo
Jean-Francois Côté's profile photo
tazi energies urbaines's profile photo
Etienne Bisson's profile photo
Julien Blanchard's profile photo
Stéphane GEMMANI's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Co-founder at Gowento
Employment
  • Gowento
    Co-founder, 2014 - present
  • Qobuz
    Software Engineer, 2009 - 2014
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
San Francisco, US
Story
Tagline
Software/Web Engineer. Co-founder @gowento. Internet Hacker. UI/UX Fanatic. Apple Addict.
Education
  • ENSIIE
    Computer Science
Basic Information
Gender
Male