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Long Game

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This is one of the best things I've ever read.

Violence is not even in our past.  Violence continues today. I was reading a stat that the neighborhood where the “riots” popped-off earlier this week is in fact the most incarcerated portion of the state of Maryland. And this is not surprising. We live in a country where the incarceration rate is 750 per 100,000. Our nearest competitor is allegedly undemocratic Russia at 400 or 500 per 100,000. China has roughly a billion more people than America; America incarcerates 800,000 more people than China. And as bad as that national incarceration rate is, the incarceration rate for black men is somewhere around 4,000 per 100,000. So if you think the incarceration rate for America is bad, for black America it’s somewhere where there is no real historical parallel.

Hat tip to +George Station.
Black people in Baltimore are subjected to violence all the time.
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This is worth your read.
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Kids are uploading their adolescence in real-time, and the Internet refuses to forget. Will it change the way we live as adults?

One of the greatest difficulties between young people and adult people, of course, is that adult people have a hard time remembering exactly what it’s like to be young. Spending time with my partner’s mother recently, we found an essay she wrote when she was 15 or 16 — we laughed at the bravado of her prose, but were also moved by her passion and idealism. Typed on a typewriter, on yellowed paper, unseen for decades, it was the most teenage thing ever. She was amazed at revisiting her poetic younger self. And even though much less time has passed for me, I’m sure I would be unsettled to re-read something that I wrote in high school. It would be like emotional time travel.
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“Let’s be clear,” says Edzard Ernst, emeritus professor of complementary medicine at Exeter University, “there are two types of detox: one is respectable and the other isn’t.” The respectable one, he says, is the medical treatment of people with life-threatening drug addictions. “The other is the word being hijacked by entrepreneurs, quacks and charlatans to sell a bogus treatment that allegedly detoxifies your body of toxins you’re supposed to have accumulated.”

If toxins did build up in a way your body couldn’t excrete, he says, you’d likely be dead or in need of serious medical intervention. “The healthy body has kidneys, a liver, skin, even lungs that are detoxifying as we speak,” he says. “There is no known way – certainly not through detox treatments – to make something that works perfectly well in a healthy body work better.”

Thanks to +Shannon Turlington for the pointer.
There’s no such thing as ‘detoxing’. In medical terms, it’s a nonsense. Diet and exercise is the only way to get healthy. But which of the latest fad regimes can really make a difference? We look at the facts
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Ferguson reminds us of just how potent social media and online pushback can be when applied to the issues that really affect us, the deep, intrinsic issues that it can be hard for traditional media to report on, because they're so intractable with such thick, tangled roots. It's one thing to say that young black men are much more likely to be stopped by police, even if they haven't committed a crime, or to say that women are at much higher threat of violence from men than vice versa. It's another entirely to hear story after story about both topics, on Twitter, on Facebook, on Vine, throughout the ether. Those who might not typically have a voice finally do, and they can push back against those narratives they find so limiting and damaging.
By pushing back against official narratives, social media turns stories like Ferguson into major news.
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Nostalgia is funny.
 
I LOVE this. I mean, I LOVE The Little Mermaid -- I ranted on Twitter about the absurdity of all the "post-Frozen, TLM seems sexist" op-eds (because let's face it, we all knew this shit was sexist in 1989. A just-turned 7-year old me used to kvetch about the plot holes of the film in the bath tub with my Little Mermaid toys from McDonald's. I was acutely aware of the wrong message but who really gave a shit, the music was dope as all get out, the visuals were awesome. Screw it.) so I won't repeat that here (oh wait, already did it in the first parenthetical), BUT this video is still great.

Also, I got to meet the +AVbyte dudes last night at an event at +Nasdaq and they are SO dope. Great job on the music, guys!
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I think this story tells us so much about the origins of the drug war—the degree to which it was about race, then and now, and how they prefigure what we do to addicts today. People who are addicts are in terrible pain—Billie Holiday was raped and prostituted as a child—and we take these people and inflict more pain and suffering on them, and then we’re surprised they don’t stop taking drugs.
Sam Harris, neuroscientist and author of the New York Times bestsellers, The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, and The Moral Landscape.
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Why we don't win any intellectual honesty awards.
Explosive claims that US military soldiers and contractors had sexually abused at least 54 children in Colombia thus far seem to have received zero coverage in the mainstream US press.
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There are so many powerful stories here.
I know this is corny, but y'all are awesome for all the wonderful stories and advice. I'm not sure how to check who gave me the gold, but I'd...
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This is a story of how harmless choices can make a harmful world.

Our cute, adorable segregation simulator is based off the work of Nobel Prize-winning game theorist, Thomas Schelling. Specifically, his mathematical model of racial segregation found in Dynamic Models of Segregation. We built on top of his model, by showing how adding a small cultural demand for diversity can help desegregate a neighborhood. In other words, we gave his model a happy ending.
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Beckert writes, the United States was unique among all other industrializing nations in that it both grew and manufactured its own cotton. The trick, of course, was that all these new cotton-manufacturing nations depended on slave-grown cotton. Like other new scholars of capitalism, Beckert drives home the point that slavery was not a hidebound institution that capitalism destroyed, but an integral one that made capitalism possible.
Less than a decade ago, a historian interested in the rise of capitalism would have a difficult time finding a job in a history department. The closest thing scholars wrote about capitalism was called labor history, the story of the working class. Almost no one bothered writing about the flip...
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Focusing on eternity means caring little for the future.

In addition, 39 percent of Americans say God would not allow humans to destroy the Earth (53 percent disagree). So, apparently, most of those who believe we're in the end times also believe God would intervene. Basically at least four in 10 Americans see little reason for a human response -- or, at least, doubt things will wind up being catastrophic.
49 percent of Americans say the severity of recent natural disasters is a sign of the biblical end times.
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Welcome to Long Game.