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Liz Hall (Painspeaks)
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Founder Pain Sufferers Speak, Co-Founder Empathy Cruises
Founder Pain Sufferers Speak, Co-Founder Empathy Cruises

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Good Night and sweet dreams 😘
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The urban farms sprouting up and across cities around the world aren't just feeding mouths, they are "critical to survival" and a "necessary adaptation" for developing regions and a changing climate, according to a new study.
Urban farms, which include plain ol' allotments, indoor vertical farms and rooftop gardens nestled amongst busy streets and skyscrapers, have become increasingly popular and important as the world's population grows and more and more people move to cities.

The United Nations predicts that by 2030, two-thirds of the world's population will be living in cities, with the urban population in developing countries doubling. That's a lot of mouths to feed.
The new paper, published in the journal Earth's Future and led by the Arizona State University and Google, finds that this expected urban population boom will benefit from urban farming in multiple ways.
As the Thomson Reuters Foundation explained from the study Urban farms could supply almost the entire recommended consumption of vegetables for city dwellers, while cutting food waste and reducing emissions from the transportation of agricultural products.
According to the study, urban agriculture can help solve a host of urban environmental problems, from increasing vegetation cover (thus contributing to a decrease in the urban heat island intensity), improving the livability of cities, and providing enhanced food security to more than half of Earth's population.
After analyzing multiple datasets in Google Earth Engine, the researchers calculated that the existing vegetation on urban farms around the world already provides some $33 billion annually in services from biocontrol, pollination, climate regulation and soil formation.
The future of urban agriculture has even more potential, the researchers found.
We project potential annual food production of 100–180 million tonnes, energy savings ranging from 14 to 15 billion kilowatt hours, nitrogen sequestration between 100,000 and 170,000 tonnes, and avoided storm water runoff between 45 and 57 billion cubic meters annually the authors wrote.
In addition, we estimate that food production, nitrogen fixation, energy savings, pollination, climate regulation, soil formation and biological control of pests could be worth as much as $80–160 billion annually in a scenario of intense [urban agriculture] implementation.

Others have praised urban farming for its many benefits.
Urban agriculture won't resolve all food production and distribution problems, but it could help take pressure off rural land while providing other advantages wrote environmentalist Dr. David Suzuki.
He cited an example of how one patch of Detroit land, where 12 vacant houses were removed to grow food, has supplied almost 200,000 kilograms of produce for 2,000 local families, provided volunteer experience to 8,000 residents and brought the area new investment and increased safety.
Local and urban agriculture can also help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and recycle nutrient-rich food scraps, plant debris and other 'wastes' Suzuki continued.
Because maintaining lawns for little more than aesthetic value requires lots of water, energy for upkeep and often pesticides and fertilizers, converting them to food gardens makes sense.
Writer and former Vancouver city councillor Peter Ladner also wrote in The Urban Food Revolution: Changing the Way We Feed Cities
When urban agriculture flourishes, our children are healthier and smarter about what they eat, fewer people are hungry, more local jobs are created, local economies are stronger, our neighborhoods are greener and safer, and our communities are more inclusive.
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“People do not wander around and then find themselves at the top of Mount Everest.”

― Ziglar #leadership
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Source: University of Texas at San Antonio
Chris Packham, associate professor of physics and astronomy at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has collaborated on a new study that expands the scientific community’s understanding of black holes in our galaxy and the magnetic fields that surround them.

“Dr. Packham’s collaborative work on this study is a great example of the innovative research happening now in physics at UTSA. I’m excited to see what new research will result from these findings,” said George Perry, dean of the UTSA College of Sciences and Semmes Foundation Distinguished University Chair in Neurobiology.

Packham and astronomers lead from the University of Florida observed the magnetic field of a black hole within our own galaxy from multiple wavelengths for the first time. The results, which were a collective effort among several researchers, are deeply enlightening about some of the most mysterious objects in space.

A black hole is a place in space where gravity pulls so strongly that even light cannot escape its grasp. Black holes usually form when a massive star explodes and the remnant core collapses under the force of intense gravity. As an example, if a star around 3 times more massive than our own Sun became a black hole, it would be roughly the size of San Antonio. The black hole Packham and his collaborators featured in their study, which was recently published in Science, contains about 10 times the mass of our own sun and is known as V404 Cygni.

“The Earth, like many planets and stars, has a magnetic field that sprouts out of the North Pole, circles the planet and goes back into the South Pole. It exists because the Earth has a hot, liquid iron rich core,” said Packham. “That flow creates electric currents that create a magnetic field. A black hole has a magnetic field as it was created from the remnant of a star after the explosion.”

As matter is broken down around a black hole, jets of electrons are launched by the magnetic field from either pole of the black hole at almost the speed of light. Astronomers have long been flummoxed by these jets.

These new and unique observations of the jets and estimates of magnetic field of V404 Cygni involved studying the body at several different wavelengths. These tests allowed the group to gain a much clearer understanding of the strength of its magnetic field. They discovered that magnetic fields are much weaker than previously understood, a puzzling finding that calls into question previous models of black hole components. The research shows a deep need for continued studies on some of the most mysterious entities in space.

Journal Reference:
Yigit Dallilar, Stephen S. Eikenberry, Alan Garner, Richard D. Stelter, Amy Gottlieb, Poshak Gandhi, Piergiorgio Casella, Vik S. Dhillon, Tom R. Marsh, Stuart P. Littlefair, Liam Hardy, Rob Fender, Kunal Mooley, Dominic J. Walton, Felix Fuerst, Matteo Bachetti, A. J. Castro-Tirado, Miguel Charcos, Michelle L. Edwards, Nestor M. Lasso-Cabrera, Antonio Marin-Franch, S. Nicholas Raines, Kendall Ackley, John G. Bennett, A. Javier Cenarro, Brian Chinn, H. Veronica Donoso, Raymond Frommeyer, Kevin Hanna, Michael D. Herlevich, Jeff Julian, Paola Miller, Scott Mullin, Charles H. Murphey, Chris Packham, Frank Varosi, Claudia Vega, Craig Warner, A. N. Ramaprakash, Mahesh Burse, Sujit Punnadi, Pravin Chordia, Andreas Gerarts, Héctor de Paz Martín, María Martín Calero, Riccardo Scarpa, Sergio Fernandez Acosta, William Miguel Hernåndez Sånchez, Benjamin Siegel, Francisco Francisco Pérez, Himar D. Viera Martín, José A. Rodríguez Losada, Agustín Nuñez, Álvaro Tejero, Carlos E. Martín Gonzålez, César Cabrera Rodríguez, Jordi Molgó, J. Esteban Rodriguez, J. Israel Fernåndez Cåceres, Luis A. Rodríguez García, Manuel Huertas Lopez, Raul Dominguez, Tim Gaggstatter, Antonio Cabrera Lavers, Stefan Geier, Peter Pessev, Ata Sarajedini. A precise measurement of the magnetic field in the corona of the black hole binary V404 Cygni. Science, 2017; 358 (6368): 1299
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aan0249
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Quotable - Edgar Allan Poe, born 19 January 1809, died 7 October 1849. Read more here: http://bit.ly/2pRH7Wh
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