Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Liz Covart
896 followers -
Historian of Early America with a Podcast, Practical History Blog, & a penchant for problem solving.
Historian of Early America with a Podcast, Practical History Blog, & a penchant for problem solving.

896 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
NEW EPISODE RELEASE!

Aaron Burr: Revolutionary War hero, talented lawyer, Vice President, and Intriguer of treason?

Between 1805 and 1807, Aaron Burr supposedly intended to commit treason by dividing the American union. How did Americans learn about and respond to this treasonous intrigue?

James Lewis Jr., a Professor of History at Kalamazoo College and author of The Burr Conspiracy: Uncovering the Story of an Early American Crisis, guides us through what we know and don’t know about about Aaron Burr’s supposed plot to divide the American union.

Shownotes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/204
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
New Episode Release

Hamilton the Musical hit Broadway in August 2015 and since that time people all around the world have been learning about a man named Alexander Hamilton. Or, at least they’ve been learning about the musical’s character Alexander Hamilton.

But who was Alexander Hamilton as a real person?

Joanne Freeman, a Professor of History and American Studies at Yale University, and one of the foremost experts on the life of Alexander Hamilton, joins us to explore this large question so we can discover more about the man who helped to create the United States.

Shownotes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/203
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
NEW EPISODE RELEASE!

On September 17, 1787, a majority of the delegates to the Constitutional Convention approved the new form of government they had spent months drafting and submitted it to the 13 states for their ratification and approval.

On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire became the 9th state to ratify the Constitution, which prompted the transition to the government of the United States Constitution.

Matt Wasniewski, the Historian of the United States House of Representatives
and Terrance Rucker, a Historical Publications Specialist in the Office of the
Historian at the United States House of Representatives, lead us on an
exploration of why and how the United States Constitution established a
bicameral Congress and how and why the House of Representatives took the
shape and form that it did during its early meetings.

Https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/202
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
NEW EPISODE RELEASE!

What kind of character should Americans have? Is it possible to create a shared sense of national character and identity that all Americans can subscribe to?

Americans grappled with many questions about what it meant to be an American and a citizen of the new republic after the American Revolution. They grappled with these questions because the people who made up the new United States hailed from many different cultural and ethnic backgrounds and they wondered how do you unite the disparate peoples of the United States into one national people?

Catherine Kelly, Editor of Books at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and author of Republic of Taste: Art, Politics, and Everyday Life in Early America, joins us to explore the world of art, politics, and taste in the early American republic and how that world contributed to the formation of American character and virtue.

Shownotes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/201
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
NEW EPISODE RELEASE!

What would you like to know about Early American History?

It turns out, you wanted to know about the establishment of schools, how the colonial postal service worked, and about aspects of health and hygiene in early America.

In this listener-inspired Q&A episode, we speak with Johann Neem, Joseph Adelman, and Ann Little to explore these aspects of early American history and to get answers to your questions about them.

Shownotes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/200
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
When we explore the history of early America, we often look at people who lived in North America. But what about the people who lived and worked in European metropoles?

What about Native Americans?

Today, we explore early American history through a slightly different lens, a lens that allows us to see interactions that occurred between Native American peoples and English men and women who lived in London.

Our guide for this exploration is Coll Thrush, an Associate Professor of History at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver and author of Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of the Empire.

Shownotes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/199
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
When we think of Native Americans, many of us think of inland dwellers. People adept at navigating forests and rivers and the skilled hunters and horsemen who lived and hunted on the American Plains.
But did you know that Native Americans were seafaring mariners too?
Andrew Lipman, an Assistant Professor of History at Barnard College, Columbia University and author of The Saltwater Frontier: Indians and the Contest for the American Coast, leads us on an exploration of the northeastern coastline and of the Native American and European peoples who lived there during the seventeenth century.
This episode originally posted as Episode 104.
Shownotes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/198
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
We live in an age of information. The internet provides us with 24/7 access to all types of information—news, how-to articles, sports scores, entertainment news, and congressional votes.

But what do we do with all of this knowledge? How do we sift through and interpret it all?

We are not the first people to ponder these questions.

Today, Alejandra Dubcovsky, an Associate Professor at University of California Riverside and author of Informed Power: Communication in the Early South, takes us through the early American south and how the Native Americans, Europeans, and enslaved Africans who lived there acquired, used, and traded information.

This episode originally published as Episode 082.

Shownotes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/196
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
New Episode Release!

In 1705 a group of colonists in Simsbury, Connecticut founded a copper mine, which the Connecticut General Assembly purchased and turned into a prison in 1773.

How did an old copper mine function as a prison?

Morgan Bengel, a Museum Assistant at the Old New-Gate Prison and Copper Mine, a Connecticut State Historic Site, helps us investigate both the history of early American mining and the history of early American prisons by taking us on a tour of the Old New-Gate Prison and Copper Mine in East Granby, Connecticut.

Shownotes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/195
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
New Episode Release!

As part of its mission, the National Park Service seeks to protect and preserve places saved by the American people so that all may experience the heritage of the United States. These places include those with historical significance.

Supervisory Park Ranger Garrett Cloer joins us to explore the Longfellow House-Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site so we can discover more about the Siege of Boston (1775-76) and the birth of the Continental Army and the life and work of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Shownotes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/194
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded