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Lucky enough to travel to Japan for work? Learn more about our Business #Japanese offerings today! http://ow.ly/v924301O2cS
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Want to learn Spanish or Portuguese to follow the Spanish and Brazilian fútbol broadcasts? See how you can here: http://ow.ly/zrXR301JuuN
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The final of the Copa America (Spanish: Copa América) took place on June 26th, pitting Argentina against Chile. Football (American English: soccer; Spanish: fútbol; Portuguese: futebol) has long been a favorite sport among Latin and Southern Americans, and its recent growing popularity … Continue reading →
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"Dungarees" are probably not what you think they are... http://ow.ly/udwU301JmEd
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9 months until the next episode of #GameofThrones. Take your fandom to the next level! http://ow.ly/K3p3301Hcsp
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Do your genes play a part in how easily you learn a second language? A study from U. of Washington to find out. http://ow.ly/TVEG301xIYY
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Experts don't know which linguistic family the language of the Khinalug village falls into. Via euronews: http://ow.ly/JczG301xHPE
As you set off on the road that leads to Khinalig, one of the highest and most remote mountain villages in the Caucasus, you know you are in for quite a treat. Not long after leaving the northern city of Guba in Azerbaijan, you find yourself surrounded by breathtaking scenery. It seems the higher you climb, the more impressive the mountains, canyons and passes become. And then, after driving…
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Did you know that "carnal" means "buddy, brother, pal"?
Discover more via Dr. Jennifer Wagner: http://ow.ly/PPY2301xuw4
I’ve recently been binge-watching the Telemundo telenovela ¿Quién es Quién? to learn more Mexican slang. Comedic telenovelas usually use tons of informal expressions and slang words compared to the more dramatic ones, but the characters also talk really fast so you’ll most likely need access to the subtitles and the internet to look up words …
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With the advent of instant messaging, this punctuation is gradually disappearing from everyday use: http://ow.ly/zfzf301LVpY
Language experts say one of the oldest forms of punctuation is going out of fashion, felled by the staccato sentences favored in instant messaging
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Is this because of instant (text) messaging as such, or because it's more difficult to access punctuation on a touch-screen keyboard?

The period and comma, granted, are readily accessible on the QWERTY portion of the keyboard. But the semicolon and colon are not; neither are parentheses, hyphens, and such.

When I use my tablet, I make a point of including the correct punctuation, but it's still a nuisance. I can imagine the younger people "not bothering" and skipping it. Mind, I don't think that's good -- I'm just saying...!
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Learning a new language feels like hitting a home run. Which one would you study? http://ow.ly/fUc4301Jq2T
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.Quartz covered the news from U. of Washington about the genetics of language learning. Do they influence our language adaptiveness? http://ow.ly/TIkC301xJl6
A new study suggests our genes and brain structure could be linked to how successfully we pick up a second language as adults.
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"Dezessete dias de curaçao" = The event will last 17 days

Visit our blog for more Brazilian Portuguese: http://ow.ly/g9H9301xIjE
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Athletic prowess reminds us of words such as treinamento, training, conquista, conquest, realização, achievement, and glória, glory. Numbers don’t always come to mind, but numbers are what separate votoriosos, winners from perdedores, losers, and um bom investimento para o país, … Continue reading →
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Did you know that it takes an English-speaker an average of 22-24 weeks to learn French, Dutch, or Italian? See the full #infographic via Visually: http://ow.ly/cnmJ301xCXx
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Have them in circles
259,951 people
Demmi Jaycoxe's profile photo
Adiba Khan's profile photo
anson tang's profile photo
Anastasia Aslan's profile photo
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Brian Pestronk's profile photo
ruth merriman's profile photo
Sharon Greenberg's profile photo
Caitlan Doty's profile photo
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Effective language learning for over 65 years.
Introduction
Why Choose Living Language? The answer is simple: Living Language works.

  • The Living Language Method™ is effective
  • Our programs are easy-to-use and fun so you stick with it
  • E-tutors and community forums provide support if you're stuck
The Living Language Method™

Most of us have played charades at some point or another. As a game, it's a lot of fun. We watch as someone gestures, pantomimes, and jumps around, trying to guess what it could possibly be that they're trying to convey. In the game, we expect a lot of ridiculous wrong guesses, and we even like the torturous frustration of having no clue what the answer is. The urge to yell "just tell us the answer!" is all part of the fun. But why would anyone want to learn a language this way?

The Living Language Method™ is not a game of charades. It doesn't force adult language learners to try to absorb a new language, like they could when they were babies. It makes use of all the tools that adults have at their disposal to learn efficiently and effectively, without clumsy guesswork or frustration, in order to really learn how to speak a new language.

Build A Foundation

Work with what you have. The easiest way to learn a new language is to use the same learning strategies that have worked for you in the past and let your native language serve as a bridge to your new language. Begin speaking immediately using essential words and phrases.

Progress with Confidence

Languages are complex systems, but can be broken down into simple steps. By following a building block approach, you can learn a language in small pieces, each piece reinforcing the previous one, while preparing you for the next one. Advance from words to full sentences, then to actual conversations.

Retain What You've Learned

It's easiest to learn and remember a new language when you use more than one sense. The combination of audio and visual input, along with written, recorded, and interactive digital practice, creates a true multimedia learning experience that actively engages you in your new language right from the start. In addition, special recall exercises move your new language from short-term to long-term memory.

Achieve Your Goals

Don't just mimic or memorize. To speak a new language, you need more than words and memorized phrases. With clear and simple explanations of grammar, you'll develop practical language skills to speak with confidence in any situation.