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Lisa Church
wandering san francisco and beyond
wandering san francisco and beyond
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An amazing dinner yesterday with the crew from Outstanding in the Field

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So great!
hey fellow street art fans. google cultural institute just launched their street art project showcasing 5000+ examples of artworks from all around the world. it even captures some, like the stunning murals at brooklyn's 5pointz, that are now painted over. excuse me while i get lost.

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Great place, try it if you have not been there!

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David Remnick on Russia's invasion of the Crimean peninsula: "Putin’s reaction exceeded our worst expectations. These next days and weeks in #Ukraine are bound to be frightening, and worse." http://nyr.kr/1dNIaom
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Interesting!
With Mardi Gras in full swing and Fat Tuesday right around the corner, I thought I would share some history of the types of cuisine which comes out of Louisiana in general and New Orleans specifically.

Mind you when thinking of Southern Cuisine there are very distinct differences which should be noted and respected.  For instance, very big differences between Low Country Cuisine and the cuisine this post is about although their are lots of similarities as well.

I hope you enjoy this an future posts on the subject.  I am writing extensively about this in my upcoming cookbook Soul Fusion : West African Culinary Influences in the Americas.

Enjoy and share with others ...

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An Introduction to the Difference between Cajun and Creole Culture and Styles of Cooking

Do you know the differences between Cajun and Creole cuisine?  Would you be surprised to know that they are not the same?  Often when people who are not from Louisiana and specifically New Orleans think about foods from that part of the United States they assume these are one in the same. 

Well, they're not.  In honour of Mardi Gras and Fat Tuesday I thought I would provide some cultural history on both types of cuisine and the very different cultures they come from.

Here are some great words from +Amy Bayliss about the differences that I think are spot on descriptions.  My only addition is that I will find ways future posts to highlight the many West African influences on Creole cuisine that are not necessarily highlighted in the following information.

Cultural and Historic Differences:

"The original definition of a Creole was “one that was born in Louisiana.” Simply put, if you were born here then you were a Creole baby. That is how they distinguished the natural born citizens of Louisiana way back when.

Today, the term has been adapted to mean that you are a descendant from a mixture of  cultures. For example, if a person has Spanish and African ancestry or French and Native American ancestry then they would be considered Creole. That pretty much means almost everyone in Louisiana is a Creole but it all started because there was once a law that stated that there could be no intermarrying of races."

"The Cajuns, are descendants of Acadians (les Cadiens).The Acadians were French peasants who found a home in what is now New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada. ... The Acadians were French peasants who found a home in what is now New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada."

Cooking Style Differences:

"Both styles of cuisine were influenced by the French, Spanish, Africans, Germans, Italians, Haitians, and Native Americans ( Houmas, Chetimaches, and Choctaw). The base ingredients were the same as well. The Cajun and Creole trinity (based on the French’s mire poux) consists of bellpepper, onion, and celery. I would be remiss not to tell you that garlic is the center of the culinary heavens and is most always included with the trinity. Andouille, seafood, wild game, vegetables, corn, and rice were also favored among both. In addition to that, both groups make use of the roux though the Creoles roux was usually lighter in color.

The distinctions of Creole cuisine begins with the social class. Creoles were able to bring in chefs and experienced cooks to to train their slaves and other staff to make use of the local ingredients. Their dishes are more refined; more precise. Their sauces were based around butter and cream and they typically used tomatoes in their dishes (Italian and Spanish influenced).  They also usually had several light courses including desert and other baked items."

#SouthernCuisineHistory  #Creole #Cajun #SoulFusion #ChefHistorian 
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“Snow’s blankness, the nothingness that covers everything, makes indoors feel particularly interior.”

Read more of this week’s staff picks, including August Kleinzahler’s poem “Red Sauce, Whiskey, and Snow,” a new restored version of the film “The Adventures of Prince Achmed,” and a love letter to giallo cinema, here: http://tpr.ly/1bElAwp.

Art credit Bela Erdössy.
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