Profile

Cover photo
Life Without Plastic
194 followers|29,534 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
Did you know 80% of the litter in the Great Lakes region is plastic? See this new action-oriented report by Environmental Defence Canada on how to protect the Great Lakes and fight plastic pollution.
http://environmentaldefence.ca/report/turning-the-plastic-tide/
1
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
Craig and Marc Keilburger and the organizations they have founded (WE Day​) are formidable forces for positive change. We're thrilled to be a part of their latest column in the Globeandmail.com​ on how to reduce the plastic in our lives...

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/giving/have-your-say-how-can-we-each-reduce-the-plastic-in-our-lives/article29181566/
Craig and Marc Kielburger founded Free The Children, Me to We and We Day
1
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
Feel free to check out our latest blogpost - here's one where you can make a real difference by educating yourself and building awareness... Two Breaths of Life in A Plastic Ocean

http://lifewithoutplastic.com/store/blog/two-breaths-of-life-in-a-plastic-ocean/
Last weekend, I watched a powerful, “plastic-free” eco-documentary called Breath of Life at the dynamic Wakefield International Film Festival (WIFF). Wakefield is our home town, and we were honoured to sponsor the film for its Canadian premiere. Created by Hawaiian filmmaker Susan Kucera, Breath of Life was masterfully filmed in Europe, Scandinavia, North America and Hawaii. It addresses
1
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Our study shows that making plastic products with BPA alternatives does not necessarily leave them safer"
- Nancy Wayne, Professor of Physiology, UCLA

Companies advertise "BPA-free" as a safer version of plastic products ranging from water bottles to sippy cups to toys. Many manufacturers stopped used Bisphenol A to strengthen plastic after animal studies linked it to early puberty and a rise in breast and prostate cancers.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160201103543.htm

Study link: http://press.endocrine.org/doi/10.1210/en.2015-1785
1
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
"The planet is slowly being covered in plastic."

New research published in the scientific journal Anthropocene, argues that the Holocene epoch (which began about 11,700 years ago) has ended and we are now in the Anthropocene epoch, which is characterized by human activities changing the Earth's geology.

The indicators are the abundance of human-created materials found in sediment all over the world -- ranging from aluminum, concrete and plastics to PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), PAHs (polyaromatic hydrocarbons), pesticides, nuclear fallout (from bomb tests in the 1940s and 1950s), nitrogen and phosphorus (from increased fertilizer use).

And regarding plastics in particular, this is what one of the authors of the study, Jan Zalasiewicz, had to say: “In 1950, we virtually made [no plastic] at all. It is an incredible rise. [The] annual total of 300 million tonnes [of plastic] is close to the weight of the entire human population of the planet. And the figure for plastic manufacture is only going to grow. The total amount of plastic produced since the second world war is around 5 billion tonnes and is very likely to reach 30 billion by the end of the century. The impact will be colossal.”

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jan/24/plastic-new-epoch-human-damage

The scientific articles...
On the Anthropocene epoch: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/351/6269/aad2622

On plastics as a key indicator of the Anthropocene epoch:
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/351/6269/aad2622
From supermarket bags to CDs, man-made waste has contaminated the entire globe, and become a marker of a new geological epoch
1
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 

This is a question we often get. And Katherine from Treehugger has handled it masterfully. Of course, we're thrilled she is in love with our stainless steel containers. We love them too, and we also regularly use our glass containers with stainless lids for freezing - just need to be sure they are are room temperature or cooler before putting them in the freezer. Mason jars are amazing. And her "package-free" suggestion is a fine one - I (Jay) do this every summer harvest with tons of fresh tomatos for winter soups and stews. http://www.lifewithoutplastic.com/store/kitchen/food-storage/airtight-watertight-containers.html

http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/how-freeze-food-without-plastic.html
Say good-bye to a freezer full of Ziplocs, Tupperware, and plastic wrap. There's another, much greener way to freeze food.
1
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
194 people
Paul Brown's profile photo
Nine Naturals's profile photo
Kelly Cramer's profile photo
Beth Terry's profile photo
Deanna Piercy's profile photo
Deborah Connor's profile photo
Life Without Paper's profile photo
Alessandra DiNinno's profile photo
Kevin Passero's profile photo

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
In-depth report and tests show that most food cans -- 67% of the 192 tested -- still have Bisphenol A (BPA) in the lining - even those from food companies that have pledged for years to find replacements for BPA.

BPA is an endocrine-disrupting chemical that impacts our hormonal systems and may contribute to a host of harmful health effects including breast and prostate cancer, infertility, type-2 diabetes, obesity, asthma and attention deficit disorder.

http://www.ecocenter.org/healthy-stuff/food-can-study-2016-report
SIGN UP! for Updates and Action Alerts from HealthyStuff.org. The Ecology Center's HealthyStuff.org lab analyzed and identified the interior linings of 192 food cans containing vegetables, fruits, soups, broth, gravy, milks and beans. We found two out of three cans contained linings made from ...
1
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Mayor of Montreal plans to completely ban plastic water bottles from being sold in the Montreal, Canada - this on the heels of the city's plastic bag ban, set to come into force in 2018. The bottled water industry was taken by surprise by the announcement and is preparing to contest the ban.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/montreal-plastic-water-bottle-ban-coke-pepsi-lobby-1.3493462

http://www.globalpost.com/article/6740912/2016/03/02/montreal-plastic-water-bottles
But local bottled water reps complain their healthy beverage is being singled out.
2
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
Media reports are showing excitement about a newly discovered bacteria - named Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6 - that breaks down polyethylene terephthalate (PET), the plastic used to make most single-use disposable water bottle, among other common plastic disposables.

But careful here before getting too excited about this being a panacea for cleaning up plastic waste already in the environment. While the bacteria does appear to break down PET into its two core components - terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol, which can degrade naturally in the environment - there are still substantial toxic additives in plastics such as PET which would then be released into the environment. They might be less toxic if they were kept solidified in the PET form.

So while this bacteria could be helpful in plastic remediation in a controlled industrial setting, we're a long way off from it being sprayed out into the environment to break down plastic waste - and remember, it's specific to PET, not all plastics.

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/10/could-a-new-plastic-eating-bacteria-help-combat-this-pollution-scourge

The scientific study: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/351/6278/1196
Karl Mathiesen: Scientists have discovered a species of bacteria capable of breaking down commonly used PET plastic but remain unsure of its potential applications
1
1
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
On Location with 'A Plastic Ocean,' a new adventure documentary that seeks to change our attitudes toward single-use plastics within a generation. Watch the trailer at Plastic Pollution Coalition: [http://bit.ly/1PTHjL5] #PlasticPollutes #APlasticOcean
Production on an important new documentary about the human impact on our world oceans due to plastic pollution is wrapping up. Please share the trailer and help spread the word.
1
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
With the wonderful spread of plastic bag bans all over the world, this is a great question, and as always, the lovely and talented Umbra from Grist.org responds masterfully. Note: It's not just about recycling... there are other creative options.

http://grist.org/living/my-city-banned-plastic-bags-now-where-am-i-supposed-to-recycle-them/
A zealous city banned plastic bags -- then got rid of the bag-recycling bins too. Stuck with a bunch of bags, a reader asks advice maven Umbra Fisk how to handle the situation.
1
Add a comment...

Life Without Plastic

Shared publicly  - 
 
On January 19th, a report entitled "The New Plastics Economy: Rethinking the future of plastics" was launched at the World Economic Forum currently taking place in Davos, Switzerland. 

The report addresses the following question:  "How can we turn the challenges of our current plastics economy into a global opportunity for innovation and value capture, resulting in stronger economies and better environmental outcomes?"

A key culprit is plastic packaging:  "Most plastic packaging is used only once; 95% of the value of plastic packaging material, worth $80-120 billion annually, is lost to the economy."

In arguing for a circular plastic economy where "plastic never becomes waste," the authors point out that a business-as-usual approach will lead to the following outcomes by 2050:  
- oceans likely containing more plastics than fish (by weight) 
- the entire plastics industry will consuming 20% of total oil production and 15% of the annual carbon budget. 

Time for change. The report offers a blueprint for moving forward, with an emphasis on global collaboration, innovation, and communication.

http://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/01/how-can-we-create-a-world-where-plastic-never-becomes-waste
Davos 2016: By 2050, oceans are expected to contain more plastics than fish, and 20% of all oil produced will be used in plastic production. This is a trend that must be reversed.
1
1
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
194 people
Paul Brown's profile photo
Nine Naturals's profile photo
Kelly Cramer's profile photo
Beth Terry's profile photo
Deanna Piercy's profile photo
Deborah Connor's profile photo
Life Without Paper's profile photo
Alessandra DiNinno's profile photo
Kevin Passero's profile photo
Contact Information
Contact info
Phone
+1.888.898.0369, +1.819.459.1459
Email
Fax
+1.613.482.9372
Story
Tagline
Your one-stop shop for safe, high quality, ethically-sourced, Earth-Friendly alternatives to plastics for everyday life.
Introduction
LifeWithoutPlastic.com is the one-stop shop for safe, high quality, ethically-sourced, Earth-friendly alternatives to plastic products for everyday life - and a solid resource for info on plastics and alternatives.