Profile

Cover photo
Liam Jackson
Works at Hewlett Packard
Attended University of Northampton
Lived in Bristol, United Kingdom
119 followers|352,584 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTubeReviews

Stream

Liam Jackson

Shared publicly  - 
 
A physical inspection is worth 1000 dmesgs... Had this weird problem of my microserver going into S3 randomly every few hours/days. Turns out it has a feature that if it's getting warm it presses it's own power button. Anyway after a few hours of remotely trying to figure out what's going on I go to plug in a monitor to check the BIOS and see this.

That was clean when I moved the server about 3-6 months ago! I've set myself a Google calendar to go and clean it in 6 months :-D
1
Add a comment...

Liam Jackson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Last night I watched the first two episodes of Humans - CH4's remake of Äkta Människor, a show about synthetic human robots/slaves in a parallel present. Really enjoyed them, great acting and production, really good drama so far. The 'synthetics' are at the prefect point in the uncanny valley. Would recommend! 
1
Add a comment...

Liam Jackson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
This is wonderful; neural network setup producing wonderful results; one example is training it on wikipedia and it ends up producing valid XML pseudo articles.  Another is training it on Linux kernel source, and it ends up producing C code that looks appealingly complex until you try and figure it out (even with bogus comments).
http://karpathy.github.io/2015/05/21/rnn-effectiveness/
7 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Liam Jackson

General discussion  - 
 
Has anyone seen the Turnigy/hobbyking 3D printer?
For those that don't know, Turnigy is a low cost, good value manufacturer of RC model stuff like motors, controllers, batteries and vehicles.

The printer has some interesting design choices. 4 rods but one leadscrew for a 150mm bed. X motor moves on the Y carriage. Some of the motors appear to be NMEA 23. Lots of injection moulded parts too. I wonder how that acrylic box will work as a frame?

Not a bad price for a printer with a heated bed and LCD shipped from the UK. But i would like to see it in person and see some prints off it to judge quality.

http://hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__76924__Fabrikator_DIY_3D_Printer_Kit_UK_Warehouse.html

Turnigy Fabrikator, our worst kept secret is here; what we didn’t leak out was how good it is. This is the best value for money printer on the market with the features and quality of printers three times the price.  No longer is 3D printing technology the exclusive realm of hard-core technophiles and industrial designers, it is now accessible to anybody with a computer and the ability to put flat pack furniture together. Whether you are into plan...
7
2
Liam Jackson's profile photoJohn Snow's profile photoTom Witko's profile photoFrancisco Hernandez's profile photo
11 comments
 
i just picked up one of these for 300 bucks
Add a comment...

Liam Jackson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Discussions about DRM often land on the fundamental problem with DRM: that it doesn't work, or worse, that it is in fact mathematically impossible to make it work. The argument goes as follows:

1. The purpose of DRM is to prevent people from copying content while allowing people to view that content,

2. You can't hide something from someone while showing it to them,

3. And in any case widespread copyright violations (e.g. movies on file sharing sites) often come from sources that aren't encrypted in the first place, e.g. leaks from studios.

It turns out that this argument is fundamentally flawed. Usually the arguments from pro-DRM people are that #2 and #3 are false. But no, those are true. The problem is #1 is false.

The purpose of DRM is not to prevent copyright violations.

The purpose of DRM is to give content providers leverage against creators of playback devices.

Content providers have leverage against content distributors, because distributors can't legally distribute copyrighted content without the permission of the content's creators. But if that was the only leverage content producers had, what would happen is that users would obtain their content from those content distributors, and then use third-party content playback systems to read it, letting them do so in whatever manner they wanted.

Here are some examples:

A. Paramount make a movie. A DVD store buys the rights to distribute this movie from Paramount, and sells DVDs. You buy the DVD, and want to play it. Paramount want you to sit through some ads, so they tell the DVD store to put some ads on the DVD labeled as "unskippable".

Without DRM, you take the DVD and stick it into a DVD player that ignores "unskippable" labels, and jump straight to the movie.

With DRM, there is no licensed player that can do this, because to create the player you need to get permission from Paramount -- or rather, a licensing agent created and supported by content companies, DVD-CCA -- otherwise, you are violating some set of patents, anti-circumvention laws, or both.

B. Columbia make a movie. Netflix buys the rights to distribute this movie from Columbia, and sells access to the bits of the movie to users online. You get a Netflix subscription. Columbia want you to pay more if you want to watch it simultaneously on your TV and your phone, so they require that Netflix prevent you from doing this.

Now. You are watching the movie upstairs with your family, and you hear your cat meowing at the door downstairs.

Without DRM, you don't have to use Netflix's software, so maybe just pass the feed to some multiplexing software, which means that you can just pick up your phone, tell it to stream the same movie, continue watching it while you walk downstairs to open the door for the cat, come back upstairs, and turn your phone off, and nobody else has been inconvenienced and you haven't missed anything.

With DRM, you have to use Netflix's software, so you have to play by their rules. There is no licensed software that will let you multiplex the stream. You could watch it on your phone, but then your family misses out. They could keep watching, but then you miss out. Nobody is allowed to write software that does anything Columbia don't want you to do. Columbia want the option to charge you more when you go to let your cat in, even if they don't actually make it possible yet.

C. Fox make a movie. Apple buys the rights to sell it on iTunes. You buy it from iTunes. You want to watch it on your phone. Fox want you to buy the movie again if you use anything not made by Apple.

Without DRM, you just transfer it to your phone and watch it, since the player on any phone, whether made by Apple or anyone else, can read the video file.

With DRM, only Apple can provide a licensed player for the file. If you're using any phone other than an iPhone, you cannot watch it, because nobody else has been allowed to write software that decrypts the media files sold by Apple.

In all three cases, nobody has been stopped from violating a copyright. All three movies are probably available on file sharing sites. The only people who are stopped from doing anything are the player providers -- they are forced to provide a user experience that, rather than being optimised for the users, puts potential future revenues first (forcing people to play ads, keeping the door open to charging more for more features later, building artificial obsolescence into content so that if you change ecosystem, you have to purchase the content again).

Arguing that DRM doesn't work is, it turns out, missing the point. DRM is working really well in the video and book space. Sure, the DRM systems have all been broken, but that doesn't matter to the DRM proponents. Licensed DVD players still enforce the restrictions. Mass market providers can't create unlicensed DVD players, so they remain a black or gray market curiosity. DRM failed in the music space not because DRM is doomed, but because the content providers sold their digital content without DRM, and thus enabled all kinds of players they didn't expect (such as "MP3" players). Had CDs been encrypted, iPods would not have been able to read their content, because the content providers would have been able to use their DRM contracts as leverage to prevent it.

DRM's purpose is to give content providers control over software and hardware providers, and it is satisfying that purpose well.

As a corollary to this, look at the companies who are pushing for DRM. Of the ones who would have to implement the DRM, they are all companies over which the content providers already, without DRM, have leverage: the companies that both license content from the content providers and create software or hardware players. Because they license content, the content providers already have leverage against them: they can essentially require them to be pro-DRM if they want the content. The people against the DRM are the users, and the player creators who don't license content. In other words, the people over whom the content producers have no leverage. 
66 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Liam Jackson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Getting a package from the US (Printrbot extruder gears) via USPS, does anyone know what this means?

The Postal Service has identified a problem with the processing of this item at 7:45 pm on February 25, 2015 in WEST SACRAMENTO, CA 95799. The local facility has been alerted and is taking steps to correct the problem.
1
Add a comment...

Liam Jackson
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
Looks interesting, Atmel usually have good maker support. I like atmel studio. Look forward to seeing how easy it is to dev on this. 
Kaivan Karimi, Atmel VP and GM of Wireless Solutions, provides insight into the Internet of Things and the role of BLE connectivity.  It has been a year since my last blog at my old gig, and what a...
1
Add a comment...
In his circles
92 people
Have him in circles
119 people
Richard Horne's profile photo
Michel Pollet's profile photo
Ali Law's profile photo
Tony Olivo's profile photo
Mukesh Sharma's profile photo
sagami3261's profile photo
USComponent's profile photo
Shetal Gori's profile photo
Daniel Norée's profile photo

Liam Jackson
moderator

Devices  - 
 
The gecko series is great so thinking this might be quite a cool module too!
 
Silicon Labs Blue Gecko Bluetooth Smart Module Now Available at Mouser http://mou.sr/1NrTprx
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Liam Jackson

Discussion  - 
 
Does anyone know why octoprint would be acting slow? Installed dev branch on raspian on a Pi 2 using my fastest Samsung micro SD card and best 2.5A power supply.

Loading the UI takes an age to load if it does at all, connect takes minutes, uploading even few kb file takes minutes and pressing a button like home Z while uploading takes tens of seconds to respond.

I've tried 3 different (all recommended) wifi dingles and an alternative (RS Components raspberry pi) power supply.

Top shows low CPU use from octoprint and SFTP to the pi is normal.

I was running a very old version on a crappy SD on a Pi 1 before and it was fine, so I'm sure it's not octoprint, but lost as to what it could be! 
1
Mike Podruchny's profile photoEdward Boston's profile photoLiam Jackson's profile photoAnders Jackson's profile photo
10 comments
 
Can be new configurations for new version of Raspbian.
Thanks for sharing!
Add a comment...

Liam Jackson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Round 2?
This is about doing, not about about waiting for something to happen. The Hackaday Prize will send one person into space for building the next evolution of hardware.
1
Add a comment...

Liam Jackson

Questions/Help  - 
 
Is there a 'gearhead' style extruder (two gears both driving the filament rather than an idle bearing) with a lever that allows quick changing of filament?
2
John Davis's profile photoLiam Jackson's profile photoSteve Wood (Gyrobot)'s profile photo
8 comments
 
+Liam Jackson It is still in beta test. Definitely needs to be in steel for longevity of the sharp teeth. Under tests it provided an improvement for the constraint of Filaflex, the advantages for rigid materials is still unclear until the steel version is made.
Add a comment...
People
In his circles
92 people
Have him in circles
119 people
Richard Horne's profile photo
Michel Pollet's profile photo
Ali Law's profile photo
Tony Olivo's profile photo
Mukesh Sharma's profile photo
sagami3261's profile photo
USComponent's profile photo
Shetal Gori's profile photo
Daniel Norée's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Hewlett Packard
    Software Engineer, 2014 - present
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Software Engineer (N-Able), 2013 - 2014
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Bristol, United Kingdom - Wiltshire, United Kingdon - Northampton, United Kingdom
Links
Story
Introduction
Went to The George Ward Secondary School in Wiltshire, Am currently at the University of Northampton studying Computing.
Bragging rights
I have a self sourced, built and modified RepRap 'MendleMax' 3D printer.
Education
  • University of Northampton
    Computing, 2010 - 2013
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • Monument Valley
  • Despicable Me:Minion Rush
Always friendly, helpful and good value!
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
1 review
Map
Map
Map