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Levine Dispute Resolution Center LLC
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Levine Dispute Resolution Center LLC's posts

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At least in Massachusetts, we now know two things:

You shouldn’t send a bible to a judge before whom you are a litigant; and
If you do, you should not expect him to rule in your favor before recusing himself.


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Over the last year, BV Wire, an excellent publication of Business Valuation Resources, LLC, has been chronicling the New Jersey trial of Wasniewski v. Walsh, in which three Superior Court judges addressed a shareholder withdrawal case, with serial appeals and remands. 

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In the Washington Court of Appeals’ recent case, Marriage of Cheng (denominated “unpublished” as in our Appeals Court Rule 1:28) the court set out an interesting marker for double counting analysis with closely held businesses that are valued by income methodologies: if it is a business with expectations for income growth, awarding alimony (they call it “maintenance”) from its future earnings is not a “double recovery” or, as we call it “double count” or “double dip”. 

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[Preface: We do not accept parenting coordinator assignments, but as divorce mediators, we do address parenting coordination in agreements from time to time, with clients. Our observations follows the order of appearance in the rule and not any editorial priority.] 

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We have recently seen marketing materials for the “Marijuana Licensing Reference Guide, 2017 Edition”, written by the aptly-named “Cannibiz Media”, and co-published with BVR, a pre-eminent business valuation resource. 

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The Appeals Court’s recent Ludwig v. Lamee-Ludwig approaches the intersection of unvested stock options and double counting, colloquially known as “double dipping”, in divorce litigation. Relying on the Supreme Judicial Court’s (SJC) Bacanti v. Morton, they got it right. But, was the SJC precedent correctly decided? It is worth revisiting. 

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You represent the lower earning spouse whose income is insufficient to fully meet his lifestyle needs. His job is insecure, but not enough to convince the judge to discount it as best evidence of earning capacity. Or, his spouse’s earnings curve is ascending, with the resulting potential for a greater alimony award for your client, if only the alimony determination were made, not now, but later. The presumed durational alimony limit is 7 years, and the potential payor is 15 years shy of social security retirement age. So, your client can play for up to 8 years’ time before his spouse’s retirement age threatens the presumed maximum term. 

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1. Both can last up to four years, eight with appeals.
2. Both can feel a lot longer – and the effects will outlast it.
3 Facts are often “alternative facts”.
4. Objective truth is aspirational.
5. Memory is selective. 

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Sometimes, a Massachusetts Appeals Court Rule 1:28 Memorandum and Order (a/k/a “unpublished opinion”) addresses an issue or cluster of issues that make it noteworthy, despite its paucity of detail and lack of formal precedential value. The Appeals Court’s Heystek v. Duncan is one of those cases, tackling 3 significant issues in understated but significant ways:

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In a Rule 1:28 Memorandum and Order, a panel of the Massachusetts Appeals Court ruled that a pre-marital agreement applied to the death of a spouse, based on contract language that described its scope. Here is that term, fully as reported in the opinion, but broken down by clause:
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