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Leverett Eyecare, P.C.
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Nearsighted? You may be more likely to experience floaters in your visual field. Do you notice small, shadowy shapes that float across your eyes when you hold your gaze on a bright background like a white wall or the sky? Yep. Those are floaters.
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Floaters occur as the eye's vitreous dissolves, but tiny undissolved pieces float between the eye’s lens and retina. As light enters your eye, these small pieces cast shadows on the retina, showing up in the images you see.
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Starting around age 9 or 10, the vitreous (the gel-like substance that fills 80% of the eye) begins to dissolve into a more watery substance. While we don’t know why it happens, this gradual process is the underlying cause of many of the floaters we see.
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Seeing spots? If you look up at the sky and notice small, squiggly shapes floating across your field of vision and darting away when you try to focus on them, you’ve got floaters.
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This daily dose of cuteness is to remind you that kids are at risk for Computer Vision Syndrome, too. If screen time leaves your child complaining about headaches or rubbing their eyes, ask your eye doctor about special strain-relieving eyewear.
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As we age, the lenses in our eyes grow less flexible, making computer work more difficult beginning around age 40. If you’re noticing Computer Vision Syndrome symptoms, talk to your optometrist about ways to ease eye strain.
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Working long hours behind a computer? Use the 20-20-20 rule to help relax your eyes. Every 20 minutes, look away from your screen, focus on something around 20 feet away, and keep your gaze there for about 20 seconds.
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Give your eyes a break by ensuring that your computer screen is at the right height to ease digital eye strain. Position your monitor slightly below eye level, about two feet away from your face, to support eye comfort.
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If you experience double vision and neck or back pain during screen time, you may be suffering from Computer Vision Syndrome. To relieve eye strain, ask your optometrist about getting a pair of special computer glasses.
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Does your work require long hours behind a computer? You may be at risk for Computer Vision Syndrome, a repetitive motion injury (like carpal tunnel) that affects the eyes, leaving them tired and strained.
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