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Lev Osherovich
Attended UC San Francisco School of Medicine
Lives in San Francisco
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Lev Osherovich

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The New York Times writes about Germany's new openness to cheap laughs about Hitler. A new satirical book, Look Who's Back imagines Hitler waking up from a nap transported to today's Germany. Wacky zaniness ensues.

In a review, the newspaper Die Tageszeitung called the book “incredibly boring and not in the least bit funny.” It added, “Instead of a well-made satire, the book is a marketing coup,” and noted that the book was less subversive than advertised. “Of course it is allowed, satire is famously allowed about everything. But just because you are allowed something doesn’t mean you have to — let alone can — do it.”

Perhaps for added commercial reach, the film version (starring John Travolta, Kirstie Alley and Olympia Dukakis) will feature Hitler reincarnated as a talking baby--- Look Who's Talking About Genocide.
The book’s success is evidence of a generational shift, a sense that after 70 years after the Nazis, it’s time to use dark humor to address Germany’s past.
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Garden seeks insects

I have a small gardening space under a mature plum tree (see Figure 1) in my San Francisco garden.

I would like to attract more of the "right sort" of insects to my garden.

Most edibles don't seem to grow well here due to limited dappled afternoon sunlight in summer. So I've planted mustard, yarrow, onion, society garlic plus parsley and dill, with the aim of establishing a colony of good bugs to guard the Brassicas, which are sorely afflicted by aphids this year (see Figure 2).

So which bugs do I want and how do I attract them?

Calling all #plantbio #gardening #agriculture #entomology Geeps:

-What should I plant?

-When should I plant it?

-Who are the bugs I'm seeking to attract?

-What is a good resource on agriculturally relevant insects? I'm looking for a college textbook-level guide to pollinator biology.


Many thanks to respondents. Please reshare.

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I'll have to think on this one, but if he's up to it, +Chris Mallory might have some of your answers (and possibly sooner than me).
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Today in Joachin Miller Park (Oakland, California) I noticed this moth feeding on the nectar of a pungent flowering tree. The graceful movement of the moth's long proboscis in and out of individual blossoms was quite impressive.

Can anyone help me to identify the tree and/or moth?

+Carissa Braun​
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You threw me for a loop on this one, +Lev Osherovich. It just looked not quite right to the ones in my region, but try California Buckeye, Aesculus californica. I think that might be the one you're looking for :)
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Psychology studies are roughly as reliable as a coin toss, Nature reports.
 
The results from an ambitious effort to replicate 100 research findings in psychology are in, and the results are....mixed. #reproducibility
Crowd-sourced effort raises nuanced questions about what counts as replication.
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+Lev Osherovich Seroquel is an interesting drug, and probably a bad example here. It's use in bipolar disorder is actually an off label use for the drug. In low doses it doesn't work like an antipsychotic, it simply helps regulate sleep (something vital to bipolar diagnosis).

The efficacy in research is subjective, in a sense. Being able to reproduce a singular effect of the drug across multiple people (within a range) is possible, but not in completely uniform way (side effects vary widely and are not considered in replicated studies).

Once you leave the realm of pharmaceuticals and enter into behavioral research you really get into subjective judgment of findings. There can be, and sometimes needs to be, a debate among alternative findings on the same subjects. These are the areas where validity can exist absent of reproduction of results. In fact, any study relying upon humans to give answers to open ended questions will be a one shot deal. This is why patterns are more important than exact replication.

You're absolutely correct in your comments on efficacy in pharmaceutical research, and I would like to believe they are focused on efficacy and safety, but I cannot say I believe it's always the top priority.
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National Public Radio heaps scorn on +Chipotle Mexican Grill's anti-GMO stance:

Here at The Salt, though, we’ve been hearing from people who think Chipotle’s stance shows little integrity at all. Rather, it shows a double helping of marketing hype, they say. Greg Jaffe, the expert on GMOs at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, calls it “hypocritical” and based on “smoke and mirrors.” The Washington Post, meanwhile, accused the company of joining a “global propaganda campaign.”
Chipotle says providing "food with integrity" means dropping genetically modified ingredients. But critics say the company's new policy is inconsistent and even dishonest.
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+Lev Osherovich what is harmful? Vaccination? 
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+Chipotle Mexican Grill​​​​​ 's anti-GMO publicity stunt has met with blowback from mainstream media. Here's what National Geographic says:

What Chipotle is doing isn’t science and it isn’t common sense.

Chipotle founder Steve Ells states that the company decision isn’t about GMO health risks, but about promoting “food with integrity.” This sounds like a praiseworthy aim–but the accompanying implication that GMO foods are unsafe, untrustworthy, and best gotten rid of isn’t doing any of us any good.

This is the sort of publicity campaign that may have damaging consequences for our future.
The popular Mexican chain's decision will likely fan the flames of an already burning controversy pitting science against public passion.
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+Chris Merle sadly, you are correct.
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First Time Butterfly Parents Seek Advice

We have a new tenant in the house, possibly a Black Swallowtail. I tried to feed him a variety of leaves and grasses but he kept migrating upward, so it looks like he's fixing to pupate.

Any advice on butterfly husbandry, my insectoid Geeps?

#butterflies #entomolgy #cocoon

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The Wall Street Journal waxes rhapsodically about the Citroën DS ("Goddess").

I've driven a nicely preserved late model DS belonging to a friend's dad. I loved it. The steering wheel-mounted shift lever for the semi-automatic transmission took some getting used to, as did the floaty oleopneumatic suspension. It's like a car designed by alien engineers for vaguely humanoid life forms with a different set of appendages. In other words, it's French.

#classiccars
The Citroën DS is technically unsurpassed, completely inimitable, has a great back story and is the most beautiful car of all time, writes Dan Neil
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French futuristic idea from 60's
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The Wall Street Journal has this essay on the convoluted history of migration and interbreeding by early human populations. Ancient DNA evidence suggests that nobody is a native on anywhere for long.
Armed with old bones and new DNA sequencing technology, scientists are getting a much better understanding of the prehistory of the human species, writes Matt Ridley
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Details. Wow.

I think: I'm left... ummm? No actual political message other than : We can all lay claim?

I'm not so sure I'm that.... objective.
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New rules to determine what is Organic

The Washington Post reports on the difficulty of determing what is or is not kosher/halal Organic faced by the Sanhedrin/Ulama National Organic Standards Board.

Among the dozens of public commenters on Monday were a potato grower who asked the board to approve a chemical to keep his stored spuds from sprouting; a maker of organic lecithin - lecithin is an emulsifier common in many foods - who wanted the board to close the loophole that allows synthetic lecithin; and an organic advocate from Vermont who, speaking for some strawberry farms, wanted the board to preserve the exception for ferric phosphate, a chemical used as a slug and snail bait.

The potato grower, Derin Jones, from Chin Family Farms in Oregon, acknowledged that a natural substance, clove oil, can be used to keep potatoes from sprouting. But a chemical known as "3-decene-2-one" or "3D2," works much better, and he showed pictures to prove his point.

This reminds me of the contemporary rabbi/imam-puzzler about whether a pig genetically engineered to be tidy, cud-chewing and split-hoofed could be considered kosher or halal.

#organic #religion #kosher #halal
A panel this week will look at which synthetic substances can be used in the production of "organic" food.
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+1 for a range of labels from "legal" through "humane", "free-range", "organic" to "vegan". Part of the problem here is the definition, agreement and standardisation of the labels. And the corruption and politics involved in the bodies that do that standardisation.

I'd like to be able to buy a chicken that had a reasonable outdoor chicken life without being stuffed with antibiotics, that was killed humanely and fed on the kind of things chickens like to eat. And I want a label on it that guarantees that is what I'm buying (and paying a bit extra for). Is that too much to ask?
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The Washington Post editorial on +Chipotle Mexican Grill's anti-GMO publicity stunt is scathing:

Chipotle isn’t much different from other successful restaurant chains past and present. Its latest marketing campaign, however, takes righteous chowing-down to a troubling new level. On Monday, the chain announced that its entire menu is GMO-free — meaning it contains no ingredients derived from genetically modified plants or animals. Thus has a leading food company added its imprimatur to a global propaganda campaign that is not only contrary to the best scientific knowledge but also potentially harmful to vulnerable populations around the world.
The chain fuels anti-GMO fears with an irresponsible new campaign.
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Mother Jones, which has recently stepped back from its previous anti-GMO stance, thinks the +Chipotle Mexican Grill anti-GMO claim is pure publicity-seeking:

Here's the thing, though: GMOs are totally safe to eat. Eighty-eight percent of the scientists in that same poll agreed. As longtime environmentalist Mark Lynas pointed out in _The New York Times recently, the level of scientific consensus on the safety of GMOs is comparable to the scientific consensus on climate change, which is to say that the disagreement camp is a rapidly diminishing minority. Lynas also made the equally valid point that so-called "improved" seeds have a pretty remarkable track record in improving crop yields in developing countries, which translates to a direct win for local economies and food security. (Although there is evidence that widespread GMO use can lead to an increased reliance on pesticides.)_
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Education
  • UC San Francisco School of Medicine
    Biochemistry
    Ph.D.
  • University of California, Berkeley
    Genetics
    B.A.
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Specializing in the general
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I use Google Plus for social interaction, news reading and note management.
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Molecular biologist
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Volvo enthusiast
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San Francisco
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Every car lover's nightmare! I brought them my lovely blue Volvo C30 for a routine cleaning and detailing. Mario, the manager, was friendly but immediately tried to up-sell a costlier service than what was included in my Amazon Local deal. Something about the business's alternate name -- a used car dealership called Trustworthy Motors -- made me nervous, so I took some pictures of my car before I handed the car over. When I got the car back, there was a patch of paint missing from the front bumper valance! At first, Mario claimed that the damage was there already, but I had the photos to prove otherwise. He then offered to fix it at his body shop, but there's no way I'm trusting these guys to work on my car after that BS. Lesson learned: I'm never, ever going back to ADS Mobile.
• • •
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
New (opened mid-2014) retail site of Sea Ranch-based bakery. Baked goods (cookies, coffee cakes, breakfast pastries) are pedestrian but competent. Passable espresso. Has the air of a struggling place with remote management.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Surprisingly good brunch fare. Uncrowded on a weekday. Try the cherry pie.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Busiest and best casual dining in town. Excellent baked goods,large wholesome portions of savory food, friendly staff, a bustling crowd of locals and tourists. Will be my go - to lunch spot next time I pass through.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
19 reviews
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Superb fancy salads and sandwiches, hip tiny space. The house-poached tuna and egg salad was excellent.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Good thin crust pizza with foodie - pleasing toppings. Good local ice cream. Kid - friendly space with a big playroom upstairs. Service and facilities are very basic (bathroom out of order due to local water shortage).
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Fantastically quirky family-run motel full of nautical kitsch and oddball art. Think of it as the Madonna Inn for merchant marines. Accommodated us despite a very late arrival. Excellent home - made breakfast, friendly staff, lots to explore in and around the lodge. Would definitely stay again.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago