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Lev Osherovich
Attended UC San Francisco School of Medicine
Lives in San Francisco
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New York Times writes about Norway's idyllic Halden prison, which looks like a remake of The Prisoner set in IKEA, minus the floating eyeballs. The inmates enjoy a higher material quality of life of most "free" American workers.
The goal of the Norwegian penal system is to get inmates out of it.
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Small/local/organic/non-GMO is big business

The Wall Street Journal has a short, informative piece about the shift in consumer demand toward small, local and often organic-branded packaged foods. 


Smaller companies focused on natural and organic foods are feasting on shifts in tastes among consumers distrustful of established food giants’ products and ingredients. The rise of these smaller companies, helped by growing interest from big retailers, is eating into demand for brands that for decades were commonplace in American kitchens, like Kraft Foods Group Inc.’s macaroni and cheese and Kellogg Co.’s breakfast cereals.
Natural, organic foods from small producers muscle in on big names
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+Lev Osherovich Biohacking could become a hobby. 
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The Wall Street Journal reports on how IARC's recent misclassification of glyphosate (Roundup) as a "probable" carcinogen is a blow to Monsanto.

For those wondering about what's going on, the best hypothesis I've seen (via +Tyson Adams​​) is that the IARC classification is based largely on a 2003 study suggesting that glyphosphate exposure raises risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a form of blood cancer. The IARC authors were unaware that the same team published a followup paper in 2005 in which they failed to replicate their prior findings.

All of this doesn't matter, because henceforth in the mass media headlines and minds of the public, "ROUNDUP CAUSES CANCER!!!"
Warning on Roundup weed killer follows low crop prices, criticism of biotech food
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+Chris Patil​​, check out the Science Media Centre statement posted above by +Tyson Adams​​. Also, here is my original thread on this with some informative comments:

https://plus.google.com/+LevOsherovich/posts/U8tYkFmDXKk



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Read this article in Farmer's Weekly about ongoing efforts to develop nutritionally enhanced flax oil using genetic engineering.

The plant is Camelina sativa:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camelina_sativa

What I like about this piece is the clear and accurate description of what is going on. It does not, however, mention that anti-GMO activists are up in arms about the work at Rothamsted and have vandalized previous experimental plantings:

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-18140957



H/t +Gaythia Weis​​​​​​
Britain’s first trial of GM crops enriched with nutrients to improve health has been successfully harvested.
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The message here SHOULD focus on the current harvest and the promising results, IMHO.   Rothamsted, by great efforts at public outreach has succeeded in engaging the local public in their efforts and isolating the extreme activists as the vandals that they were.  Granting them publicity now only risks resurrecting them.  Without publicity they have little power. 
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What happens when food producers cave in to activist demands to remove GMOs from their products? Higher cost, lower nutrition and a nice little logo to make rich white people think they're saving the world.
 
So I got on the merry-go-round of #GMO issues with Tom Colicchio the other day. Heh. The abject denial of the costs of this, and the consequences, are astonishing to me.
Some chatter about GMO labeling demonstrates that those with the largest megaphones do not necessarily have the right information, unfortunately. They have a responsibility to get it right.
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+Lev Osherovich​ I never said there weren't other solutions, but he was the one that implied there wasn't a problem.
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An inspiring Longreads piece about Janet Vaughan, the heroic clinician-scientist who organized Britain's wartime blood banks. Vaughan made fundamental discoveries about blood transfusion and nutrition by doing field experiments during the Blitz and in liberated concentration camps.

H/t +Bob Calder

The extraordinary life of Janet Vaughan, who changed our relationship with blood.
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Biogen Idec (BIIB) reported details of its Phase Ib Alzheimer's disease trial of BIIB037, an monoclonal antibody against amyloid beta. Initial reports of positive findings in the 166-patient trial had buoyed BIIB's stock in December, with a similar bump today. 

I haven't seen the primary data so can't comment about its quality. However, several previous mAbs targeting amyloid beta showed promising results all the way through Phase II, but crashed and burned in large scale Phase III trials. 

So don't get your hopes up about this one... there's many a slip twixt cup and lip. 
A Biogen Idec drug that targets plaque buildup in the brain slowed cognitive decline in patients with early and mild forms of Alzheimer’s disease in a small, early-stage study, lifting the company’s stock to all-time highs and adding to the debate on how to treat the debilitating disease.
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This little guy crawled into my travel bag last weekend.
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Dinosaur in hand!
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My local Costco put their special sanctified demon-free Organic food section right next to the garden supplies, including this fine jug of neonicotinoid pesticide solution.

This seems a bit like putting the bacon next to the halal meat.
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Tip: look for the word "systemic." 
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GMOs do not cause cancer. There is no excuse for ActionAid's lies.

H/t +Jeff Green​​
Donors to one of Britain’s largest humanitarian aid charities have been unwittingly funding an aggressive anti-GM food campaign in Africa that misleadingly warns farmers that eating the crops could give them cancer.
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Cherry-picking with organophosphates

A new review of organophosphate herbicide carcinogenicity published in The Lancet by International Agency for Cancer Research, a World Health Organization research unit, makes a totally shocking claim that glyphosate (Roundup) is a dangerous Group 2A carcinogen.

This contradicts nearly everything we have previously learned about glyphosate, and is no doubt good news for Monsanto haters.

Alarmingly, glyphosate (Group 2A --"probably carcinogenic to humans") is ranked as more dangerous than tetrachlorvinphos and parathion (Group 2B -- "possibly carcinogenic to humans"). The latter compounds are banned or restricted in EU and US due to animal and human toxicity. Yet the actual evidence against glyphosate, summarized in the paper extract below, is weak and inconsistent. The 2A classification for glyphosate seems out of the blue.

Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide, currently with the highest production volumes of all herbicides. It is used in more than 750 different products for agriculture, forestry, urban, and home applications. Its use has increased sharply with the development of genetically modified glyphosate-resistant crop varieties. Glyphosate has been detected in air during spraying, in water, and in food.

There was limited evidence in humans for the carcinogenicity of glyphosate. Case-control studies of occupational exposure in the USA,14 Canada,6 and Sweden7 reported increased risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma that persisted after adjustment for other pesticides. The AHS cohort did not show a significantly increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

In male CD-1 mice, glyphosate induced a positive trend in the incidence of a rare tumour, renal tubule carcinoma. A second study reported a positive trend for haemangiosarcoma in male mice.15 Glyphosate increased pancreatic islet-cell adenoma in male rats in two studies. A glyphosate formulation promoted skin tumours in an initiation-promotion study in mice.

Glyphosate has been detected in the blood and urine of agricultural workers, indicating absorption. Soil microbes degrade glyphosate to aminomethylphosphoric acid (AMPA). Blood AMPA detection after poisonings suggests intestinal microbial metabolism in humans.

Glyphosate and glyphosate formulations induced DNA and chromosomal damage in mammals, and in human and animal cells in vitro. One study reported increases in blood markers of chromosomal damage (micronuclei) in residents of several communities after spraying of glyphosate formulations.16 Bacterial mutagenesis tests were negative.

Glyphosate, glyphosate formulations, and AMPA induced oxidative stress in rodents and in vitro. The Working Group classified glyphosate as “probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A).

Plant science Geeps, what is going on here?

+Mary Mangan​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ +David Tribe​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ +David Nicholl​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​
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They cite a paper from DeVoss 2003 and then omit the follow up from 2005 by the same group that found no link. Basically sounds like they didn't read enough.
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Have him in circles
393 people
luciana olmstead-Rose's profile photo
Miki Paul's profile photo
Eddy Mario's profile photo
AutoTrendz's profile photo
Tony Diepenbrock's profile photo
Lydia Gould's profile photo
Fernando Cho Cao's profile photo
Yvonne D. Foskey's profile photo
Concerts in San Francisco's profile photo
Education
  • UC San Francisco School of Medicine
    Biochemistry
    Ph.D.
  • University of California, Berkeley
    Genetics
    B.A.
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Specializing in the general
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I use Google Plus for social interaction, news reading and note management.
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Molecular biologist
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Volvo enthusiast
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San Francisco
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Every car lover's nightmare! I brought them my lovely blue Volvo C30 for a routine cleaning and detailing. Mario, the manager, was friendly but immediately tried to up-sell a costlier service than what was included in my Amazon Local deal. Something about the business's alternate name -- a used car dealership called Trustworthy Motors -- made me nervous, so I took some pictures of my car before I handed the car over. When I got the car back, there was a patch of paint missing from the front bumper valance! At first, Mario claimed that the damage was there already, but I had the photos to prove otherwise. He then offered to fix it at his body shop, but there's no way I'm trusting these guys to work on my car after that BS. Lesson learned: I'm never, ever going back to ADS Mobile.
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Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
New (opened mid-2014) retail site of Sea Ranch-based bakery. Baked goods (cookies, coffee cakes, breakfast pastries) are pedestrian but competent. Passable espresso. Has the air of a struggling place with remote management.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Surprisingly good brunch fare. Uncrowded on a weekday. Try the cherry pie.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Busiest and best casual dining in town. Excellent baked goods,large wholesome portions of savory food, friendly staff, a bustling crowd of locals and tourists. Will be my go - to lunch spot next time I pass through.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
19 reviews
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Superb fancy salads and sandwiches, hip tiny space. The house-poached tuna and egg salad was excellent.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Good thin crust pizza with foodie - pleasing toppings. Good local ice cream. Kid - friendly space with a big playroom upstairs. Service and facilities are very basic (bathroom out of order due to local water shortage).
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Fantastically quirky family-run motel full of nautical kitsch and oddball art. Think of it as the Madonna Inn for merchant marines. Accommodated us despite a very late arrival. Excellent home - made breakfast, friendly staff, lots to explore in and around the lodge. Would definitely stay again.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago