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Leo 730
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electrical, mechanic, engineering, commissioning, installation, maintenance
electrical, mechanic, engineering, commissioning, installation, maintenance

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What's Your Summer Safety EyeQ?
Most of us have heard the warnings about the relationship between sun and UV light exposure and skin cancer. But many are not aware of how damaging sun and UV light can be to our eyes. "Although not every situation or every person requires sunglasses, there are many situations where the use of sunglasses will enhance comfort and may provide eye health benefits as well," says Jessica Ciralsky, M.D., an attending ophthalmologist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.
While many of us think about the sun and tanning beds when we hear about ultraviolet (UV) radiation, other sources, such as welding operations and lasers, also can produce UV radiation. UV radiation can harm the eyes, and other components of solar radiation also can impact vision.
How to Protect the Eyes
There are three types of UV radiation. UV-C is absorbed by the ozone layer and does not present any threat. However, UV-A and UV-B radiation can have long- and short-term negative effects on the eyes and vision. The longer the eyes are exposed to solar radiation, the greater the risk of developing cataracts or macular degeneration later in life. The American Optometric Association (AOA; http://www.aoa.org) recommends that whenever you spend time outdoors for work or play, wear quality sunglasses that offer UV protection and a hat or cap with a wide brim.
Sunglasses – AOA recommends the use of sunglasses that block 99-100 percent of UV-A and UV-B rays to protect the eyes from this radiation. Keep in mind that many sunglasses styles do not protect the eyes from the solar radiation entering from the sides or around sunglasses. To provide adequate protection for your eyes, AOA recommends sunglasses should:
Block out 99 to 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B radiation;
Screen out 75 to 90 percent of visible light;
Have lenses that are perfectly matched in color and free of distortion and imperfection; and
Have lenses that are gray for proper color recognition.
Wear impact-resistant lenses that meet ANSI Z87.1 if you are working outdoors where eye hazards such as flying wood chips or gravel could be an issue and when playing an outdoor sport.
Consider wearing wraparound frames for additional protection from harmful solar radiation if you spend a lot of time outdoors in bright sunlight.
Contact lenses – Some contact lenses offer additional protection. These contact lenses absorb UV radiation by reducing the amount of radiation that reaches the surface of eye. The contact lenses also protect the eye from the radiation that comes from above or around the sides of sunglasses. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has standards for UV-blocking contact lenses based on American National Standards Institute Z80.20 standards. There are two classifications of UV-blocking lenses:
FDA Class I blocker – Recommended for high-exposure environments such as mountains or beaches. The lenses in this classification must block more than 90 percent of UVA (316-380 nm wavelengths) and 99 percent of UVB (280 – 315 nm).
FDA Class II blocker – Recommended for general purposes. These lenses must block more than 70 percent of UVA and 95 percent of UVB.
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SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY GIANTS: Incubator model is reimagining research and lab design
The Francis Crick Institute, which opens this summer in London, epitomizes the trend in science and technology projects to combine disciplines and encourage transparency. The Building Team includes HOK (architect and lead designer), AKT-II (SE), Arup (PM, services engineer), CBRE (planning consultant), Turner & Townsend (cost consultant), HCD (approved inspector), RLB (CDM consultant), Cordless (ICT consultant), Exova Warrington (fire consultant), and Horus (security consultant). Photo courtesy of HOK.

The 980,000-sf, $931 million facility is the result of a unique financing mechanism that brought together three of the U.K.’s heaviest funders of biomedical research—the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, and the Wellcome Trust—and three leading universities—University College London, Imperial College London, and King’s College London. “The Crick,” as it’s known, is organized into four “laboratory neighborhoods” that encourage multidisciplinary interaction among its 1,500 scientists. Offices and labs have floor-to-ceiling glazing. The facility is designed around two atria that allow visibility throughout the building and between floors.
The design emphasizes communal space by enabling people to peer into multiple floors, according to Larry Malcic, AIA, LEED GA, SVP/Design Principal in the London office of HOK, which designed the lab. The idea, he said, is to “put science on display and promote collaboration.” Projects like The Crick practically force scientists, engineers, and technicians from disparate fields to interact. “Things are happening between disciplines now, and there are a lot more buildings with oddball combinations of sciences,” says HDR Design Principal Dan Rew, AIA, LEED AP. The state of Maryland’s $180 million Public Health Lab, which opened last year at Forest City’s Science Park, in Baltimore, exemplifies this pattern. HDR provided architectural and engineering services for the five-story, 200,000-sf lab, which does testing, consulting, and offers regulatory support related to infectious disease, epidemiology, environmental, and regulatory public health issues.
The open-lab concept allows operations to scale up and mobilize quickly in the event of an emergency, says HDR VP Warren Hendrickson, AIA, LEED AP BD+C. The ground floor, where first responders train, is visible from the street. The building is also linked to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In Seattle, the 270,000-sf headquarters of the Allen Institute is programmed for team science, says Kay Kornovich, RA, LEED AP, NCARB, Managing Director, Perkins+Will, Seattle. She says the institute wanted to break down walls between “carpet” people (managers) and “vinyl” people (researchers). The building, which opened last December, focuses on brain and cell sciences. It is organized in a series of “petals” grouped around a six-story atrium. Cantilevered into the atrium are glass-walled collaboration pods outfitted with comfortable seating and whiteboards. “In any part of the building, you can see science and meetings going on,” says Kornovich.
Saving money can be the impetus for combining disciplines and buildings. Shepley Bulfinch’s design for the University of Houston’s Health and Science Building II connects the nine-story, 300,000-sf structure to H&S Building I. This will allow them to share loading docks, animal care facilities, and expensive equipment like NMR machines, says Luke Voiland, AIA, LEED AP, Principal in the firm’s Houston office. “Clients are trying to do more with less, like bringing physics and engineering departments together,” adds Ed Burton, SmithGroupJJR’s S+T National Practice Leader. He points to the $80 million, 136,500-sf Senator Daniel K. Inouye Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Center for Excellence, which opened last September at Joint Base Pearl Harbor–Hickam, in Oahu, Hawaii. The lab consolidates operations that had been spread out over three military installations.
Some S+T facilities are incorporating business development into their objectives. Half of the space in the H&S building at the University of Houston will be used to train future pharmacists, and the other half for drug discovery research. This trend might explain why computational, simulation, and STEM labs are all the rage now. “The incubator mentality is creeping into labs,” says HDR’s Rew. Last September, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, in collaboration with the U.S. Energy Department’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, completed the 210-sf Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. AMIE 1.0 is a 3D-printed building designed to produce and store renewable power and share energy wirelessly with a 3D-printed vehicle developed by the DOE. The project aimed to demonstrate the use of bidirectional wireless energy technology and high-performance materials to achieve independence from the power grid at peak-demand periods. Philip Enquist, FAIA, SOM’s Partner in Charge of Urban Design and Planning, sees AMIE 1.0 as “the beginning of a new chapter” in building for a resilient future.
Leo A Daly is working on the Emergent Technologies Institute, located on 6.5 acres of Florida Gulf Coast University’s campus, in Fort Myers. Public and private researchers will develop and test wind, solar, and agricultural technologies at this 24,600-sf incubator lab. “We designed an infrastructure that provides a backbone for research, but remains adaptable to the academic and business communities’ needs,” says Robert Thomas, AIA, LEED AP, Leo A Daly’s Principal of S+T.
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House panel irked by Air Force request for ORS-6 launch funds
WASHINGTON – The U.S. Air Force plans to launch a weather demonstration satellite aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket next year, but has drawn the ire of a key House subcommittee in trying to ensure funding for the launch was available. In a letter dated July 1 to congressional defense committees, Deborah Lee James, the secretary of the Air Force, said the Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer, would launch in September 2017 as part of a rideshare mission. The launch is part of a previously undisclosed contract with Spaceflight Industries, which arranges rideshare launches.
James asked Congress to lift restrictions on funding for the Air Force’s next-generation weather satellite program, known as the Weather Satellite Follow-on. Congress had fenced about $21 million from the program in 2015 and 2016 as part of the National Defense Authorization Act amid concerns the Air Force was not focusing on preventing two more immediate gaps in weather satellite data: cloud characterization data and in-theater weather imagery. Lawmakers also wanted a broader weather strategy from the Defense Department. That document is expected to go to Congress soon, sources said.
James said if the Air Force did not have access to the $21 million by July 15, “the current contractual rideshare commitment will be placed at risk.” But leaders from the House Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee responded in a July 18 letter that they would release just $3.3 million, an amount they determined, in consultation with the Air Force, that would allow the launch to continue. They also noted that an electronic copy of James’ July 1 letter wasn’t sent until July 8. “We are extremely disappointed in the manner the Air Force has handled the weather satellite program,” Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Ala.), the chairman of the subcommittee, and Rep. Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.), the subcommittee’s ranking member, wrote.
“We find the current situation troubling because the Air Force has had over 18 months to develop and provide Congress a plan as required in the FY 2015 NDAA, and over seven months to provide a briefing and a certification as required in the FY 2016 NDAA. Rather than promptly completing those tasks, the Air Force instead has chosen to give Congress seven days to act on a request to waive the applicable laws in order to obtain the remaining FY 2015 and FY 2016 funds.” The HASC, and Rogers in particular, has criticized the Air Force’s handling of weather satellites in recent years for what it has described as a lack of strategy and for wasting money and Congress’ time.
“We find the Air Force’s lack of planning and execution that led to this situation very troubling and note that these actions give us significant reservations regarding the Air Force’ s ability to effectively manage this important space program,” the letter said. The Air Force’s Operationally Responsive Space office has been tasked with working on a small weather satellite, known as COVWR or ORS-6, that hopes to prove out smaller microwave technology for creating weather data on ocean surface winds and tropical cyclone intensity.
The COWVR satellite is intended to provide ocean-wind data that currently comes from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory’s Windsat satellite, which launched in 2003 and is well beyond its expected design life. The demonstration then would pave the way for the formal Weather Satellite Follow-on system, the first satellite of which would launch in 2022. James’ letter appears to be the first mention of an Air Force contract with Spaceflight. A spokeswoman for the Seattle, Washington-based company declined to comment. But during a session at the Conference on Small Satellites in Logan, Utah, Aug. 9, Air Force Lt. Col. Benjamin Cook of the ORS Office said ORS-6 would fly as one of several payloads on a Falcon 9 in the fall of 2017. “Instead of a dedicated launch, we can save significant funding by going with a rideshare,” he said. Cook didn’t say if that launch is arranged by by Spaceflight, but he did state it was a “commercial rideshare” that had control of the schedule. “It does set our timeline, which is a little bit different than most Air Force missions,” he said. In September 2015, Spaceflight announced that it had purchased a Falcon 9 from SpaceX for a “dedicated rideshare” mission scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California in the second half of 2017.
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Energy speech leaves North Dakotans 'drunk on Trump'

Donald Trump's promise to get government out of the way of energy companies was greeted with hoots and hollers in shale-rich North Dakota, where the presumptive GOP presidential nominee presented his plan. Shortly before the speech Thursday, John Trandem, a North Dakota GOP delegate, became the decisive 1,237th to declare support for the New York tycoon's bid for the nomination. In his speech at an energy conference, Trump called for cutting regulations and for building the Keystone XL pipeline, which the Obama administration has blocked.
"I'm drunk on Trump," proclaimed John Olson, a North Dakota unbound delegate and attorney representing oil, natural gas and coal companies. "He gave us policy specifics. He talked about building Keystone and eliminating the over-regulation in the energy sector. By freeing up the industry from the massive regulation burden, it would allow businesses in America to grow which would then create jobs and put Americans back to work," Olson said. "Trump also said he thinks wind [power] should make it on its own. And let's get government out of the way so capital waiting on the sidelines can be invested. We can take care of our environment and produce energy at the same time."
Gary Emineth, an unbound delegate and a former Republican National Committee chair for the state, praised Trump for promising to open up federal lands for energy exploration and development. "Trump said this can be for oil or coal. He said we can then use that money to pay down our national debt," Emineth said. "Trump said he knows the country's reserves of oil and natural gas can make the U.S. independent from the volatile Middle East.".
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Iran, Azerbaijan to increase electricity trade to 500 MW
Iran and Azerbaijan will increase their electricity trade to 500 megawatts (MW), Iran's Deputy Minister of Energy Houshang Falahatian said. The needed electricity trade infrastructures will be completed within one month, Falahatian said, state-run IRINN TV reported May 26. He said that currently electricity trade between Tehran and Baku stands at 10 MW, expressing hope that the figure will increase once the infrastructure construction is completed.
Azerbaijan has very little share in Iran's annual 10.24-billion kWh electricity energy export, according to the annual report of Iran's Energy Ministry. The country's share from Iran's 4.1 billion KWh electricity energy import stood at 0.1 percent in last Iranian fiscal year (ended March 20). Iran and Azerbaijan plan to connect their electricity networks. The two countries signed a MoU on electricity swap last December, which envisages linking the two countries' power networks and exchange of electricity.
According to Mahmoud Vaezi, Iran's ICT minister, the connection of Iranian and Azerbaijani power networks will also lead to linking them with Russian and Georgian electricity networks. Early in February Azerbaijani Minister of Energy Natig Aliyev said that Azerbaijan, Iran and Russia are working on the establishment of the North-South energy corridor among the three countries.
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