Profile

Cover photo
Len Saltiel
Works at Photographer
Attended Rutgers University
Lives in Avon, CT
12,113 followers|2,240,829 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos+1'sReviews

Stream

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Volcanic Plug - Kayenta, Arizona

Last February, Jaki Good Miller and I flew into Albuquerque and headed out on a five hour drive to one of my favorite places on Earth, Monument Valley. We had hoped to get to the 13-mile marker north of the Valley to get a sunset shot of the famous road shot made famous in the movie, Forrest Gump. Our timeframe was tight and we weren't sure we would make it. Of course, landscape photographers can be easily distracted when the light is terrific and a new and different subject appears. Cue in the volcanic plugs that we spotted about a half-mile south of the Valley. The biggest plug was the 1,500 foot high Agathla Peak, which I posted last year. In the fields around the peak there were a number of smaller volcanic plugs, like this one that made nice subjects themselves.

So, what is a volcanic plug? I'll be honest, I never heard of the term before and only learned about them when researching Agathla Peak. Simply put, they are a volcanic rock created when magma hardens within a vent on an active volcano. A plug can cause a build-up of pressure if molten magma is trapped beneath it, which could lead to an explosive eruption. I don't know whether that is the case here, but I was interested in other volcanic plugs in the US. Turns out, two places that I have visited before, Morro Rock in California and Devils Tower in Wyoming (featured in the movie Close Encounters of the Third Kind) are volcanic plugs. Who knew?
2
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Park Avenue Pano - Arches National Park, Moab, Utah

Please View Large

There are some places where you cannot easily transfer what you are seeing to a photo. They usually are vast landscapes that span 180 degrees or more. Yes, you can capture parts of the scene by zooming into subjects within the scene, but they don't give a true look to the whole experience. That is where panoramas come into play. For those who don't know how a panorama is created, it is a series of photographs that are taken of a scene and then stitched together in post-processing to create one combined photo. Alternatively, today's smart phones and mirrorless cameras have a panorama feature that allows for the pano to be stitched inside the phone or camera. The downside is that quality of the resulting file of the latter method is a bit inferior. The other disadvantage is that all panos end up as a very thin photo (unless you stitch together another "row" of photos) that doesn't always transfer well to the internet (especially Facebook).
The photo above is a pano of one of my favorite places and hikes in Arches National Park, namely Park Avenue. The vantage point where I took this photo is the beginning of the trail which ends up where the two sides converge in the center. It is not a strenuous hike but so rewarding. As you walk down of the center of the landscape and look up at the towering sandstone, you realize how Park Avenue got its name.
1
1
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Glowing Mountaintop - Two Jack Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta

Anticipation. It builds up from when the second the alarm goes off at 3:30am. After you shake off your groggy head and begin to think clearly, you check your weather app. Great news. Sunny with clouds. You peek your head outside your hotel room and look at the sky. Yep, it might be a killer sunrise. As you drive to your location, the anticipation begins to build. Once you arrive, it is still dark. You don your head lamp and determine where you want to set up your tripod. Check your settings. Take a couple of test shots. You are always amazed what today's camera sensors register in the darkness. And then you wait. You take a few more shots because there is nothing else to do even though you know they will never see the light of day. The it finally happens. The clouds start lighting up. You now know it is going to be a killer sunrise. The minutes pass by like hours until you start to see the tops of the mountain start to glow. This is when you can't be distracted because you know that this light show will last mere minutes. After the sun is up high enough to light the mountain, you begin to relax because you know you got some good photos. You know that you will shoot the rest of the day, but already the anticipation is beginning subconsciously for tomorrow's sunrise.
6
1
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Tree - Palouse, Washington

Last August, I took Jeff Clow to the Palouse for a scouting trip. Many of the photos that I have posted from this beautiful area center on barns in all stages of repair (or disrepair); occupied or abandoned farmhouses; farm machinery; rolling farmland; and, of course, the iconic views from the top of Steptoe Butte at sunrise and sunset. The butte towers about 3,600 feet above the surrounding farmland. There you get a 360-degree view from its top. I thought I would post a different shot of the butte (instead of from the butte) from below. I really like the grand old tree and used it to frame the butte.
2
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Museum Covered Bridge - Shelburne, Vermont

One of the sad things about progress is that remnants of the past slowly disappear. Sometimes, it is not obvious as the disappearance happens slowly over a long period of time. All of a sudden, we realize that what we once treasured is now hard to find. Take windmills for instance. At one time before the advent of the Industrial Revolution, there were over 200,000 windmills in Europe. Today, there are very few windmills to be found there. North America's version of the windmill are covered bridges. Many were built when horses were still the main method of transportation for individuals. Their decline started with the introduction of the automobile. Many have been replaced by modern roads and bridges. Do a search for covered bridges in your state and you will find quite a small number.

One sign that covered bridges are facing distinction is that some can now be found in museums. My wife and I spent some time in Vermont this past September and visited the terrific Shelburne Museum, which has a covered bridge on its grounds. The bridge once crossed the Lamoille River in Cambridge, Vermont. It was dismantled in 1949 and was moved to the museum grounds, situated over a small pond. The bridge is only open to foot traffic and I captured this photo of the pond and this one-room schoolhouse that was also relocated to the museum grounds. If you are in the Burlington area, please take a day visiting this unique museum. It is one of my favorites.
1
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Wash View - Artist Palette, Death Valley National Park, California

One of our stops on Jeff Clow's Photo Tour to Death Valley was to Artist Palette. The main attraction at this stop is the palette itself that you can see in the upper left, although the colors from this angle are not that pronounced. Trust me, from the parking lot, you can get a great straight-on shot of the palette where the colors are really apparent and I do have those shots. For whatever reason, I was in an exploring mood during the whole week of my trip and so, after getting the straight-on shots, I climbed and hiked out to get a composition looking up the wash. From this point, you can see where the water would run on the very few occasions that it rains in Death Valley. It also gives a better view of the Black Mountains in the background. If you look at this photo large, you can see four of my fellow photographers shooting the palette.
2
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Chandelier - Wilderness Lodge, Disney World, Florida

One of the things that Disney does so well is creating their resorts so well that you think you have been transported to somewhere else. Take this photo of one of the buildings that comprise their Wilderness Lodge. The lodge was built in 1994 and Disney's goal was to recreate a turn of the century themed resort hotel that had the look and feel of the National Park lodges located in the Pacific Northwest. The main building was modeled after the Old Faithful Inn in Yellowstone National Park. An artificial geyser and hot springs are located on the resort grounds.

This photo was actually taken in the adjacent Villas at Disney's Wilderness Lodge, which opened in 2000. We stayed there a few years ago and I took this from the center of the first floor looking up at the timbered ceiling. The Villas were themed to look like lodgings that were built by workers on the transcontinental railroad.
2
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Remains - Cook Bank, Rhyolite, Nevada

Most ghost towns have a unique story and Rhyolite, Nevada is no exception. Located near Death Valley and 120 miles from Las Vegas, the town was a mere teenager before its death. Its lifespan lasted only 15 years. It was founded in 1905, like many towns of its time, as a result of he discovery of gold. It was made home by thousands of prospectors and miners looking to get rich. Investors came in to build the town, providing it with telephone, electricity, buildings, a hospital, a newspaper and an opera house. By 1907, the population approximated 4,000. In 1908, as the main mine began to dry up, an investor ordered a study and the results were not promising. The exodus began, with only about 1,000 remaining by 1910. It took another 10 years for the remaining residents to vacate the town. Since then, it has been used in motion pictures and is also a tourist attraction. The building in the photo was the Cook Bank which also served as a Stock Exchange
1
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Johnson Lake Clouds - Banff National Park, Alberta

Banff. So many amazing locations to shoot. Way too many to shoot during the golden hours over a four day visit. After a number of visits (five, if you are counting), it gets easier to prioritize which ones are the best at sunrise and sunset. That leaves other times of the day for everything else. Some photographers will tell you that for a photo to be good, you must shoot during the golden hours. I agree with them to a degree. If you are lucky enough to have good weather with nice cumulous clouds, the light that you get at sunrise and sunset can't be matched (it's not called golden hours for nothing). But to stop shooting because the golden light is gone is simply hogwash to me. Take this photo of Johnson Lake that I took in mid-afternoon. It wasn't the best conditions that I had on this visit. In fact, it was dreary most of the afternoon. If you are patient and wait long enough, you might get a little sunlight breaking through and lighting the treetops and clouds.
4
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Mesa Arch Flare - Canyonlands, National Park, Utah

One of the most iconic and most challenging images to capture of the American Southwest is Mesa Arch in Canyonlands National Park. Why is it so challenging? It is not because it is difficult to find or get to. It is really all about its popularity with photographers; getting "the" shot during a small window of time (sunrise); and a very small area for photographers to get a good position. In fact, there may be space for only 10-12 people, and there are some that camp out overnight to get a prime spot. So, even when you get up well before sunrise, drive 45 minutes from Moab, hike to its location, you may well be totally shut out.

Last March, we arrived before sunrise and more than half of the space to shoot the arch was taken. That left few areas to get any shot of the sunrise. I was able to get a position on the right side which enabled me to get this photo as the sun rose above the distant La Sal Mountains. I wasn't able to get the full arch into my composition until later in the morning. All in all, I was pretty happy with this image and liked the sun burst and sun flare.
3
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Desert Sky - Mesquite Dunes, Death Valley National Park, California

Happy New Year! My week of not posting on the Blog or Social Media turned into two weeks. It was a time to reflect and I am looking forward to getting back in gear in 2017. 2016 was one of my most traveled years, and I am still behind in culling through last years photos. So let's get going.

This photo was taken last month in Death Valley. We got to the dunes well before sunrise and faced a half-mile to mile hike out from the parking lot. Donning our headlamps, we all headed out in different directions. As we hiked, the early morning light began to appear, revealing some great clouds in the sky. This is a bit unusual in that Death Valley doesn't usually have a lot of cloud cover (we were blessed with clouds all week). I kept checking eastward to see how the clouds were being lit and realized early on that we were going to get quite a light show. I snapped this image just before the sun peeked over the mountains.
4
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Dante's View - Death Valley National Park, California

When one thinks about Death Valley there are two things that usually come to mind: the scorching heat and the lowest point in North America. There is no dispute on either claims. The average summer temperature is about 120° Fahrenheit, with the hottest day on record hitting an unbelievable 134° Fahrenheit. The lowest point in North America is pictured in this photo, Badwater Basin at 283 feet below sea level. This view, known as Dante's View, is from the north side of Coffin Peak (the location names in Death Valley are cool, but I am sure that there are many sad stories of how they got them). Dante's View is actually at 5,476 feet above sea level, giving you an idea of how far we were above the basin.

A few of us visited this overlook on a pre-photo tour scouting trip. It wasn't a particularly cold morning and we had some great clouds. I hiked from the parking lot far enough to get a full shot of the salt flat down below. The clouds had a great pattern to them and I was lucky to get a shot of the sunrise hitting the tops of the Amargosa Mountain Range at the end of the basin to the right. Just another great day in Death Valley.
1
Add a comment...
Work
Occupation
| Photographer | Traveler | Hiker |
Employment
  • Photographer
    2007 - present
    Retired early from corporate life to pursue travel and photography.
  • Hartford Investment Management
    Chief Operating Officer, 2002 - 2007
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Avon, CT
Previously
Simsbury, CT - Langhorne, PA - Oaklyn, NJ - Gibbsboro, NJ
Links
Education
  • Rutgers University
    BS Accounting
  • Temple University
    MBA Finance
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Len Saltiel's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
The Grizzly Bears Of Glendale Cove - Toad Hollow Photography
toadhollowphoto.com

We awoke in Telegraph Cove early in the morning. Little did we know of the adventure ahead, finding us in the Grizzly Bears habitat on the c

Fisgard Lighthouse - A Sailors Friend - Toad Hollow Photography
toadhollowphoto.com

Fisgard Lighthouse is believed to be one of the oldest of it's kind on the west coast. Today it is an integral part of our parks and a great

Nomadic Pursuits - HDR travel photography blog by Jim Nix - Blog - The T...
www.nomadicpursuits.com

This is the Texas State Capitol located here in Austin and it’s a hell of a big bu...

Group/as - Lightroom-Photoshop Users - Curated by Jose Vazquez
www.group.as

Group/as is a site to help share groups of interesting people to add to your circles on Google+. Explore existing groups and add people to t

Light Tunnel — Jason Hines
jasonhines.net

I thought I'd round up the week by posting one more shot from Antelope Canyon. I have enough photos from my recent trip to post one ever

A Late Night At The Embarcadero
www.hossedia.com

Embarcadero At Night. The Embarcadero, pictured here, his in heart of the San Francisco financial district. It is bustling during the day, a

Hawk Eye – Anne McKinnell Photography
annemckinnell.com

Hawk Eye. Are you starting to think I want to be a wildlife photographer? Well, I really do actually, but it is going to take years of pract

River of Grass – Anne McKinnell Photography
annemckinnell.com

River of Grass. Most US National Parks were created to protect unique geographic features, icons like Half Dome in Yosemite or Old Faithful

55 Fantastic Photography Articles, Tutorials, Photos and Links
www.lightstalking.com

Toad Hollow Photography has been interacting with photographers all week online, and has compiled this list of tutorials, great photography

The Most Interesting Photography Links of the Week
www.lightstalking.com

This week has been action packed in terms of photography resources online, and Toad Hollow Photography has been searching for the very best

The Most Remarkable Photography Links, Articles, Tutorials and Photos of...
www.lightstalking.com

The internet provides a wonderful opportunity for people to network, and Toad Hollow Photography follows many sources during the week to fin

63 Awesome Photography Articles, Tutorials, Blog Posts and Photos from T...
www.lightstalking.com

A vibrant community of talented photographers exists on the internet, and Toad Hollow Photography searches for the best links on tutorials,

Google+ photographers to follow
www.ephotozine.com

We highlight a selection of awesome photographers you should definitely follow on Google+

29 Very Cool Photography Articles, Photos and Blogs from This Week
www.lightstalking.com

29 Very Cool Photography Articles, Photos and Blogs from This Week. By Toad Hollow Photography on 5 Aug 2011 in Web[ 2 Comments ]. A diverse

HDR Tutorial – Everything you need to know about HDR Photography
www.stuckincustoms.com

View my HDR Tutorial that shows you step by step how to create incredible high dynamic range photography images.

Being a long time photographer, I really appreciate a business that is run by other photographers, especially when they produce top notch products. Until I used Atlanta Canvas and Prints, I had been pretty disappointed with canvas prints and avoided that medium altogether. My recent canvas print that Bob produced was top notch and I would highly recommend his company to anyone looking for great results.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
1 review
Map
Map
Map