Profile

Cover photo
Len Saltiel
Works at Photographer
Attended Rutgers University
Lives in Avon, CT
12,240 followers|2,154,339 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos+1'sReviews

Stream

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Spider Rock - Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona

When I begin writing the words that accompany my photos, I often leverage my knowledge of the location and my experience when I took the photo (e.g weather conditions, time of day, etc.). Depending on what the post is trying to convey, I may also augment this with some research on the location. For this photo of Spider Rock, I wanted to convey how it got its name. In my research, I found it wasn't just a name but rather a significant story in Navajo culture. So rather than try to summarize, I found this explanation on this website: http://www.weirdus.com/. I didn't think I could write anything better so here is the writeup - word for word.

"Canyon de Chelly National Monument, located in the northeast corner of the state, is one of Arizona's lesser known destinations, but one of its most dramatic and inspiring. Though much smaller than the Grand Canyon, visitors often say it can be just as spectacular with its extraordinary ruins and breathtaking features.

De Chelly (pronounced de SHAY-ee, or more commonly de SHAY) consists entirely of land owned by the Navajo Nation and still maintains a community of Native Americans who live and farm within the canyon's walls. While sightseers are allowed to explore the chasm's rim freely, visits to nearly all areas within the canyon itself are allowed only with a guide, as many sites are considered sacred to the Navajo people.

Notable among those sites is Spider Rock, a red-sandstone survivor of epic erosion. An 800-foot spire stabbing the air that flows between the canyon's walls, it stands as a sort of unofficial icon of Canyon de Chelly. It's also the address of the mythical Spider Woman, who has chosen its pinnacle as her home.

Spider Woman is considered an important deity in the Navajo culture. According to their creation story, when the Navajo people found their way here from the underworld, she gave power to those who destroyed the evil creatures that roamed this land. In addition, she's been responsible for protecting peaceful men who have found themselves in danger from others. In one story, a young Navajo was hunting in de Chelly when an enemy warrior began pursuing him. Chased deeper and deeper into the canyon, the hunter had run out of options until he saw a silk-like cord drop down the side of Spider Rock. He tied it around his waist, and with the help of Spider Woman, the young man escaped to the top, where he was allowed to stay until it was safe.

Yet, the legend of Spider Woman does have a darker side. Aided by a spirit snitch who resides on the lower, adjacent peak known as Speaking Rock, Spider Woman seeks out those who have been mischievous and disobedient. Whenever she hears of a child who has been badly behaved, she crawls down from her perch, snatches him up and carries him back to the top to meet his fate. The chalky color that caps Spider Rock is said to be the bones of the Navajo children she has devoured."
1
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Double Arch Glow - Arches National Park, Moab, Utah

One of my favorite rock formations that I have shot is located in Arches National Park. I have shot there quite a few times and have determined it is best shot early in the mornings. The few times I have shot it in evening light have not come out very well, so I had given up on shooting there at that time. This past March, Jaki Good Miller and I had just arrived in Moab in the late afternoon and decided to take a quick spin into Arches National Park. As we headed toward The Windows and Turret Arch area, I explained to her my reluctance on shooting Double Arch at this time of day but said we would stop there on the way out. Stop we did and, to my surprise, this is the scene that we walked toward. I quickly realized that whatever I had experienced before had lead me to false conclusions. Maybe the time of the late afternoon was different in the past, but the glow through the arches was wonderful. While I still think that Double Arch is better in morning light, suffice to say I will visit it in late afternoon light in the future.
4
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 

Round Roof - Endicott, Washington

In just a few short days, I will be driving from Glacier National Park to the Palouse. I am pretty excited to visit there for the second time. What is so exciting is that I will be with my best friend, Jeff Clow and, in addition, hopefully seeing the Palouse during the harvest time. I don't know if we are hitting it at the right time for the harvest but, rest assured, it will look very different.

My previous visit was in June, when the landscape is a wonderful green almost everywhere you look. I don't expect to see much green on this trip. Instead, I hope to see (and photograph) the the golden colors of the crops grown there. The crops include the nation's richest yields of wheat and barley, lentils and chick peas. In fact, the Palouse region produces twice the national average of crops per acre.

Regardless whether we time the harvest right (this side trip was an afterthought to the Glacier trip), I am sure it will be a great scouting trip. By the way, this is the roof of one of the round barns in the area.
1
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Beach Glow - Vero Beach, Florida

I am still slowly going through some of my photos from earlier trips this year. Back in February, we spent some time on the east coast of Florida, primarily in Vero Beach. It was the first time in the area and it was quite peaceful compared to the hustle of the southern part of Florida's east coast where we have been numerous times. We were fortunate to be staying right on the beach, but the weather was unusually cold. One morning, I got up early and headed to the beach to get a few shots. The wind was blowing hard and I was freezing. There were quite the number of clouds, but they opened up for the few moments that let me get this shot.
4
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Canoeing in the Rockies - Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Emerald Lake is one of the most beautiful lakes that can be found in the Canadian Rockies. Located in Yoho National Park, the lake's name is appropriate as the water is really that color. The lake is Yoho's (a Cree name meaning awe and wonder) biggest attraction for good reason. It is surrounded by the mountains of the President Range, as well as Mount Burgess and Wapta Mountain. That gives it protection from the wind allowing for excellent reflections during the day. It also allows for smooth sailing for the canoes that can be rented there. I can't think of a better way to relax and enjoy the scenery than canoeing on the lake for several hours.
3
2
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
High Sierras - Yosemite National Park, California

Those who follow me regularly know about my love for Banff National Park in Alberta. It is my favorite national park of the many I have been to. There is a close second and that is Yosemite National Park. It has been six years since I have last been there. My friend, Steve Somers, has been posting some of his Yosemite photos, which has given me the urge to hop on a plane to California. Unfortunately. a Yosemite trip will have to wait until the fall of 2017. In the meantime, I have been going through some of my older Yosemite photos and this one from Washburn Point jumped out at me.

Washburn Point is a terrific place to get a sense of the High Sierras, as you get almost a 360 degree view from there. I like it a bit better than the view from Glacier Point as you can get a better view of Yosemite Valley and the waterfalls. This composition gives a rare side view to Half Dome and gives a sense of the peaks of the High Sierras (Washburn Point is at an elevation of 7,500 feet).
3
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
12,240 people
Jbizzy Brooks (Glass Imagery)'s profile photo
Sha Isaacs's profile photo
Alexandr Rassvetaev's profile photo
Eddy Dewey's profile photo
Alexandr Yarfits's profile photo
Andre Hofmann's profile photo
Nathan Villegas's profile photo
Casey Stanton (Casey Slaughter Stanton)'s profile photo
Lorant Gulyas's profile photo

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Back Alley - Edinburgh, Scotland
5
Girolamo Cracchiolo's profile photoFrank Nitsch's profile photo
2 comments
 
Very nice, +Len Saltiel. I like the upright lines, the textures, and the colours! :-)
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 

Parkway Beauty - Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta.

It is heard to explain to anyone how I feel when I am in the mountains. I am not sophisticated enough with words that can express my feelings. Perhaps quotes from one of the most admired naturalists and another from one of the most admired landscape photographers can better express my thoughts:

“Keep close to Nature’s heart…and break clear away, once in awhile, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.” (John Muir)

“No matter how sophisticated you may be, a large granite mountain cannot be denied – it speaks in silence to the very core of your being” (Ansel Adams)

Here is another quote that also express my feelings:

“This mountain, the arched back of the earth risen before us, it made me feel humble, like a beggar, just lucky to be here at all, even briefly.” (Bridget Asher)

So when I stand in front of subjects like this one of Hilda Peak and Mount Athabasca near Parker Ridge, these quotes are not going through my head, but rather the feelings that they convey are present.

There are some people that I know that don't understand my draw to the mountains and it is hard to explain. I often don't try as I find it impossible to properly convey what they mean to me. At those times, I sometimes say:
“The mountains are calling and I must go.” (John Muir)
3
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Autumn Mirror - Lake Waramaug State Park, Kent, Connecticut
5
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Going Low - Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

Visiting Mount Rainier is always a spiritual experience for me. The highest mountain in the Cascade mountain range is actually considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world. Its proximity to Seattle makes it one of the sixteen volcanoes on the "Decade Volcano" list. Rainier is also the heaviest glaciated mountains in the continental US with 26 glaciers. All in all, one impressive peak.

I visited Rainier in May 2015 and was fortunate to have a sunny day for my very short stay. Typically, I would have been unable to hike some of the trails, but the snow in the previous winter set a record for the least snowfall. I was able to hike a good portion of the Skyline Trail before running into snow and ice. Before my hike, I headed down to Reflection Lake to get some sunrise photos of the mountain. On my way back, I pulled over to take some road shots. I was by myself, so shooting from the middle of the road had to be done quickly, but I was lucky that there was hardly anyone on the road.
4
Darren Neupert's profile photo
 
Yet another piece of trivia: it also get more snowfall than most places on earth. It's ranks right up there in terms of inches of snow per year.
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
What Went Wrong? - Oaksdale, Washington

I have posted many photos of abandoned barns and buildings from the Palouse. This particular abandoned building is a farmhouse near Oaksdale. When I see these abandoned homes, I often want to know what happened to the farmer and his family that lived here. How long has it been abandoned? Did the farmer pass away leaving no one the property? Did the economics of the farm overwhelm them or did overall economic conditions cause it? Maybe, the farmer sold out his land at a decent profit and simply left the house to deteriorate? I am sure that I could ask many more questions that will never be answered. I love learning the history of a place, but in this case, I won't be able to research it on Google to find out. Maybe I will be lucky the next time I am here and run into someone who can tell me the story. Probably not, but who know?
1
Add a comment...

Len Saltiel

Shared publicly  - 
 
What Are You Looking At? - Central Park, Manhattan, New York

I have a lot of photographer friends that are passionate bird photographers. They live for getting photos of birds wherever they are. They know the names of almost every bird in existence (or at least seems so to me). They even have apps on their phones that have what each bird sounds like.

Followers of my posts don't see many bird photos for good reason. I am not passionate about them and, while I might photograph them when they are around, I don't exert any energy trying to find them. Even when I find them and shoot them, the likelihood of getting a great shot is low for me. Why? As much as I hate to admit it, bird photography is really hard. There is a skill set that requires a lot of practice to master. I simply am just not passionate enough to learn these skills. My idea of a great bird subject is one that is not flying (they are quite fast) but rather like a "sitting duck" (pun intended).

My birding friends travel all over the country and world trying to find exotic birds. I seem to find them elsewhere. I shot this photo of this duck in one of my most exotic locations, Central Park. There are over 120 species of ducks and I have no idea what kind of duck this is. All I know is that he was a typical New Yorker and looked at me like I shouldn't be there.
3
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
12,240 people
Jbizzy Brooks (Glass Imagery)'s profile photo
Sha Isaacs's profile photo
Alexandr Rassvetaev's profile photo
Eddy Dewey's profile photo
Alexandr Yarfits's profile photo
Andre Hofmann's profile photo
Nathan Villegas's profile photo
Casey Stanton (Casey Slaughter Stanton)'s profile photo
Lorant Gulyas's profile photo
Education
  • Rutgers University
    BS Accounting
  • Temple University
    MBA Finance
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
| Photographer | Traveler | Hiker |
Employment
  • Photographer
    2007 - present
    Retired early from corporate life to pursue travel and photography.
  • Hartford Investment Management
    Chief Operating Officer, 2002 - 2007
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Avon, CT
Previously
Simsbury, CT - Langhorne, PA - Oaklyn, NJ - Gibbsboro, NJ
Links
Len Saltiel's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
The Grizzly Bears Of Glendale Cove - Toad Hollow Photography
toadhollowphoto.com

We awoke in Telegraph Cove early in the morning. Little did we know of the adventure ahead, finding us in the Grizzly Bears habitat on the c

Fisgard Lighthouse - A Sailors Friend - Toad Hollow Photography
toadhollowphoto.com

Fisgard Lighthouse is believed to be one of the oldest of it's kind on the west coast. Today it is an integral part of our parks and a great

Nomadic Pursuits - HDR travel photography blog by Jim Nix - Blog - The T...
www.nomadicpursuits.com

This is the Texas State Capitol located here in Austin and it’s a hell of a big bu...

Group/as - Lightroom-Photoshop Users - Curated by Jose Vazquez
www.group.as

Group/as is a site to help share groups of interesting people to add to your circles on Google+. Explore existing groups and add people to t

Light Tunnel — Jason Hines
jasonhines.net

I thought I'd round up the week by posting one more shot from Antelope Canyon. I have enough photos from my recent trip to post one ever

A Late Night At The Embarcadero
www.hossedia.com

Embarcadero At Night. The Embarcadero, pictured here, his in heart of the San Francisco financial district. It is bustling during the day, a

Hawk Eye – Anne McKinnell Photography
annemckinnell.com

Hawk Eye. Are you starting to think I want to be a wildlife photographer? Well, I really do actually, but it is going to take years of pract

River of Grass – Anne McKinnell Photography
annemckinnell.com

River of Grass. Most US National Parks were created to protect unique geographic features, icons like Half Dome in Yosemite or Old Faithful

55 Fantastic Photography Articles, Tutorials, Photos and Links
www.lightstalking.com

Toad Hollow Photography has been interacting with photographers all week online, and has compiled this list of tutorials, great photography

The Most Interesting Photography Links of the Week
www.lightstalking.com

This week has been action packed in terms of photography resources online, and Toad Hollow Photography has been searching for the very best

The Most Remarkable Photography Links, Articles, Tutorials and Photos of...
www.lightstalking.com

The internet provides a wonderful opportunity for people to network, and Toad Hollow Photography follows many sources during the week to fin

63 Awesome Photography Articles, Tutorials, Blog Posts and Photos from T...
www.lightstalking.com

A vibrant community of talented photographers exists on the internet, and Toad Hollow Photography searches for the best links on tutorials,

Google+ photographers to follow
www.ephotozine.com

We highlight a selection of awesome photographers you should definitely follow on Google+

29 Very Cool Photography Articles, Photos and Blogs from This Week
www.lightstalking.com

29 Very Cool Photography Articles, Photos and Blogs from This Week. By Toad Hollow Photography on 5 Aug 2011 in Web[ 2 Comments ]. A diverse

HDR Tutorial – Everything you need to know about HDR Photography
www.stuckincustoms.com

View my HDR Tutorial that shows you step by step how to create incredible high dynamic range photography images.

Being a long time photographer, I really appreciate a business that is run by other photographers, especially when they produce top notch products. Until I used Atlanta Canvas and Prints, I had been pretty disappointed with canvas prints and avoided that medium altogether. My recent canvas print that Bob produced was top notch and I would highly recommend his company to anyone looking for great results.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
1 review
Map
Map
Map