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Lee Drew
Lives in Utah
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Lee Drew

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#genealogy   #history   #chicago The great Chicago fire of 4 Oct 1871 wasn't started by Mrs. O'Leary's Cow.  She was safely tucked into bed with her husband aw were their 5 children and a lodger on that evening when their received word that their barn was on fire.

http://www.leedrew.com/2016/04/it-wasnt-mrs-olearys-cow.html
Mrs. Kate O'Leary's Interview Q. What do you know about this fire? A. I was in bed myself and my husband and five children when this fire commenced. I was the owner of them five cows that was burnt, and the horse wagon and harness. I had two tons of coal and two tons of hay.
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#behappy   With all of the grief in the news around the world, a group of children singing reminding us to be happy is a welcome interlude in a day.
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#genealogy #photography  Genealogists and photographers will love the movie #findingvivianmaier   It is on #Netflix   and will capture your imagination.  Did she take a photo or photos of your family in and around Chicago or in the French Alps?  With over 100,000 photographs, the possibility is fairly high.  Good luck finding that one image that is so important to your family in her collection.
A documentary on the late Vivian Maier, a nanny whose previously unknown cache of 100,000 photographs earned her a posthumous reputation as one of the most accomplished street...
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A little good music to start the week...   "What's Going On" by Playing for Change..
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#Genealogy  Serendipity and a Genealogical Society.  There are few activities that generate more serendipitous events than in the search for our ancestors.   If they haven't happened in your own quest, stay with it and eventually they will.  We love talking about them because they typically result in the discovery of an ancestor or group of ancestors that everyone said were 'lost'.  

This sounds like the broad spectrum rambling of 'one of those' genealogy nuts, but for those of us who have enjoyed these experiences, we know that there are more to them than that and that we are most grateful when we get a little help in solving a mystery about our ancient family.

Rather than rejecting the concept, engage in the quest for your own ancestral families and see if a little unexpected or unexplained help arrives to assist you in your own research.  It's fun.  Don't try to analyze it or quantify it, just expect it to happen and eventually, it will in one form or another.  It will bring a broad smile to your face when it happens and maybe even a little amazement that it happened to you too.

Good luck in your ancestral quest.  We all descend from some interesting and wonderful people.

http://www.leedrew.com/2016/03/serendipity-and-genealogical-society.html
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Serendipity and a Genealogical Society
Mary Adith Tirrill Farrar Headstone Fifteen years ago, Christmas arrived in July, or at least it did in my life.  A decades-long search for the keystone on one of my ancestral brick walls was found causing the wall to tumble.  An obscure  article in a rarel...
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#EmergencyFund #Preparedness Creating emergency fund can make a big difference in a family's finances, expert says
http://www.ksl.com/index.php?sid=38621367&nid=960
This week is Utah Saves Week — part of a nationwide effort to help individuals eliminate debt, use credit efficiently and build a strong financial foundation.
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Lee Drew

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It Wasn't Mrs. O'Leary's Cow
In 1893, Michael Ahern, a reporter for the Chicago Republican, admitted that he had fabricated the story of Mrs. O'Leary''s Cow kicking over a lantern that started the Great Chicago Fire. Chicago, Illinois - 4 October 1871 2,000 Acres of Buildings Destroyed...
Mrs. Kate O'Leary's Interview Q. What do you know about this fire? A. I was in bed myself and my husband and five children when this fire commenced. I was the owner of them five cows that was burnt, and the horse wagon and harness. I had two tons of coal and two tons of hay.
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Lee Drew
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FamilySearch: 3 Websites for Finding Local History

This is the second of a three-part series exploring the use of local histories in genealogy research. Read part 1.

In last week’s article, we examined the importance of understanding an area’s local history as part of efforts to fill in a family tree.

“If we’re going to understand the ancestors, we have to understand their location,” said professional genealogist Amy Johnson Crow, in her 2016 RootsTech presentation. “I hope that when it comes time to do research you really think about exploring your ancestors’ local history because where they lived is going to have a tremendous impact on how they lived.”


While many tools and resources can help you find information on an area’s history, this article describes three of the most helpful online resources.

Historypin.org

Historypin.org is a useful website that gives users a place to come together to share photos and stories to celebrate an area’s local history.

“Historypin is a website devoted to photos, documents, and other digitized items that have been pinned onto a map,” said Crow. “What I like about Historypin is that some of the organizations and individuals who have contributed to Historypin have taken their pins and put them together in collections, either based on a theme or based on a location.”

The easy-to-use interface of Historypin.org makes the website simple and comfortable to use. That being said, remember that using Historypin.org requires a different mindset than the typical one for researching ancestors. Rather than typing a family name into the search bar, start by typing in a location.

“Search for all of the locations where your ancestor lived,” instructed Crow. “All of those locations could have an impact on some of the decisions that the ancestor made and some of the behaviors they had.”

The website integrates with Google Maps, which makes it easy to begin your search by entering the name of a specific town.

“I wanted to look for Lancaster, Pennsylvania,” says Crow as she demonstrated Historypin.org to the RootsTech audience. “When I search for Lancaster, Pennsylvania, I see clusters of pins on the map. Also, on the right side of the page, I see collections that have been built around Lancaster, either because of that location or because of a certain theme. I can click on certain collections and then see the individual pins.”

Historypin.org isn’t just for American ancestors either! In fact, the website covers much of Europe, especially England. If you have ancestors hailing from northern France, Ireland, or Scotland, check out Historypin and see what you can learn about each area.

WhatWasThere.com

Another website you can use to find information on an area’s local history is WhatWasThere.com.

“Like Historypin, WhatWasThere is very centered on digitized photos and pinning them to Google Maps,” said Crow. “But WhatWasThere is even more heavily integrated with Google Street View.”

Again, to get started on WhatWasThere, remember to think in terms of an ancestor’s location, not a name. After typing in the name of the town you’re searching, you’ll see a map that displays clusters of photos that have been uploaded for that specific area. Thumbnails of the images will appear on the left, with the map on the right.

“I wanted to learn more about the Old St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Cincinnati, Ohio,” said Crow, clicking on a photo of the church. “I like to start by reading the photo details. Sometimes the descriptions are short; sometimes they’re very long.”

After reading the photo’s details, you can click the Google Street View button to see the historic photo placed on top a modern Google street view. By adjusting the fade slider at the top of the page, you can see what the area looks like today versus what it looked like when the photo was taken.

“Be prepared to be sad a little bit when you go and do the fade,” said Crow, “because not all the buildings that we have photos of are still there. But it’s a very handy way for us to explore that neighborhood. We can see these neighborhoods and how they have changed from then until now.”

TheClio.com

Theclio.com is both a website and an app that can help you deepen your understanding of an area’s history. Though it is geographically based—as are Historypin and WhatWasThere—Clio isn’t as heavily integrated with Google Maps.

“You may not have the ability to fade between a historical photo and Google street view on theclio.com,” said Crow, “but what you are going to have is more text. You’re going to have more additional resources to go explore. And the submissions are reviewed before they’re published on the website.”

Just like you would with Historypin and WhatWasThere, use Clio to search by location. After typing the name of the area you’re interested in, you’ll see a list of submissions in or near the area. Click the place you’re interested in, and you’ll see a map of where it is, additional photos, a description, and links to additional resources to explore.

“What’s better than finding a history of something?” asked Crow to the RootsTech audience. “Finding a history that has some more sources that we can go explore!”

What other websites do you turn to for information on local histories? Tweet us @RootsTechConf.

#genealogy   #familiysearch  
*This is the second of a three-part series exploring the use of local histories in genealogy research. Read part 1. In last week’s article, we examined the importance of understanding an area...
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Lee Drew

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#oil   #bribery   World's Biggest Bribery Scandal - QNAOIL and hosts of major companies and company leaders worldwide

The story isn't showing in most of the large publications yet ...  Squashed by whom?

The Key Players

http://www.theage.com.au/interactive/2016/the-bribe-factory/

Unaoil scandal draws in WorleyParsons

http://www.smh.com.au/national/unaoil-scandal-draws-in-worleyparsons-peter-gregg-20160330-gnuqas.html

FBI And Justice Department Probing Huge International Bribery Scandal

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/fbi-justice-department-unaoil_us_56fca3bbe4b0a06d5804cbae

There’s A Huge New Corporate Corruption Scandal. Here’s Why Everyone Should Care.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/unaoil-bribery-scandal-corruption_us_56fa2b06e4b014d3fe2408b9

U.S. Oil Industry Giant Paid Millions To A Company At The Center Of Huge Corruption Scandal

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/kbr-unaoil-corruption_us_56fafbf1e4b0a06d5803f5b8

Inside The Battle Against Global Corruption

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/unaoil-corruption-enforcement_us_56fb04b4e4b0daf53aedee71
A global bribery scheme that implicates leading Western multinationals has been exposed by the leak of confidential files in the oil industry.
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#genealogy   Facebook will become the world’s biggest virtual graveyard with more profiles of dead people than living users by the end of the century, say experts  Even if you can't stand the site, it will still hold some uses for genealogists as long as it survives and profiles are accessible. 
Facebook’s refusal to automatically delete dead users automatically and the plateauing membership of the site means that the living will be outnumbered by 2098, according to a statistician.
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#ham #hamr #hamradio The Great Salt Lake Hamfest - July 8th and 9th, 2016.   Held at the Salt Lake Community College - Larry H. Miller Campus.    

http://www.thegreatsaltlakehamfest.org/
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Lee's Collections
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Have him in circles
1,272 people
Beverly Robertson's profile photo
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Work
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Researcher, Consultant, Speaker, Author, Trainer
Skills
Management Consulting, Genealogical Research, CERT, MSFT MCSE+I, MCT, Linux, Amateur Extra, VE
Basic Information
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Other names
Lineagekeeper
Story
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Consultant, Genealogist, Writer, Speaker, Trainer and Amateur Radio Operator
Introduction
My career has involved technology and corporate management across the spectrum.  Now I'm taking time to do things I thoroughly enjoy:
  • Genealogy research and instructor
  • Radio - Amateur Extra and VE
  • CERT organizer and instructor
  • Emergency Preparedness instructor
  • Microsoft Certified Instructor
  • Business Management Consultant
  • Church Service and Community Volunteer
Vacations have frequently involved traveling to find old family homesteads, cemeteries and records.

When not delving into dusty old records or enjoying family, I'm often on air in my ham shack.
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Terrific wife and family
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Utah
Previously
Massachusetts - Florida - California - New Hampshire - Oregon
Remember to take a thumb drive with you to the Family History Library because a great deal of the information there isn't online and / or can't be posted online due to usage agreements with the source owners. Add your name or a unique identifier on the outside of your thumb drive because many library patrons forget that they've left their drive plugged into a library computer. The collection of lost drives can be huge in the lost and found. Most of us won't remember an exact description of our drive to aid in its recovery. Experienced researchers usually have a text file on their drive(s) labeled "Owner Information" or a similar name that contains their contact info. WiFi is available to patrons of the library but image file sizes and numerous other issues are resolved via a thumb drive. Take a research plan with you to maximize your chances of research success. You may want to visit the FamilySearch Catalog at home prior to the trip and identify the books and films you want to view while in the library. Many seasoned researchers print the catalog page at home and write notes on the reverse side in the library, thus their notes are sourced automatically and can be scanned later for digital preservation. The information you discover may or may not fit on a piece of paper and it may or may not be worth the time to write on the paper, but a short note on it will create a memory entry that helps you decipher the quick notes and thoughts that you left for your future self. Lastly, take $$ change with you for use in the vending machines in the break room that is located in the northeast corner of the main floor. Most folks think that they will leave the building for lunch, yet when they start finding information, they rarely want to leave their research table or desk for longer than a few minutes. It's easy to discover that your time in the library is too valuable to be wasted in such a 'mundane activity' as lunch.
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