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Laura Gibbs
Works at University of Oklahoma
Attended University of California, Berkeley (B.A., Ph.D.)
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  • University of Oklahoma
    University Faculty, present
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Dedicatedly digital... teaching online for 10+ years. :-)
Introduction
I'm an online instructor at the University of Oklahoma with a long-standing interest in Aesop's fables! You can see my online courses - Mythology-Folklore & Indian Epics - at MythFolklore.net, and I blog every other day at the Bestiaria Latina.

During the summertime, I try to get some writing done. These are my books:
About the fox avatar: I use different fox images for my online avatar (sometimes a cartoon fox like Fox in Socks, or real foxes, like this one) - it's because the fox is the most important character in Aesop's fables... and the trickiest! :-)
Education
  • University of California, Berkeley (B.A., Ph.D.)
  • Oxford University (M.Phil.)

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Laura Gibbs

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Remember that Wikipedia Trails idea? Some students are choosing that as an extra credit option this week, and they are so much fun to watch. See the stream here:
http://onlinecourselady.pbworks.com/w/page/110525725/wikipediatrail
One person even did Ursula LeGuin as her starting point, which I thought was great of course! And they are all so completely, incredibly different... I am really pleased by the ones like this Ursula LeGuin one that were started by an item in the Twitter stream. I never had direct evidence like I am getting here of how students are using the class Twitter stream! :-)
http://the-quiddity-of-it.blogspot.com/2016/08/wikipedia-trail-from-ursula-k-le-guin.html
One post from the Twitter feed that grabbed my attention this week was a quote from fantasy writer Ursula K. Le Guin: "The story is not in the plot but in the telling." Because the quote resonated so much with me, and because...
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Via +Paul Hodson ... listen at your own risk! YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED. :-)
http://qz.com/767812/millennial-whoop/
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I am glad my cat is not prognosticating! :-)
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To share with students...
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And here's another one:
All the buds upon a bush do not blossom.
http://goproverbs.blogspot.com/2013/09/poster-blossom.html
All the buds upon a bush do not blossom. (Kashmiri proverb) The source for the proverb is A Dictionary of Kashmiri Proverbs by H. H. Knowles (Google Books): Tharih posh chhih nah warish gatshan. The image is by barb howe (Fli...
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I love the power of BLOGS and I love the power of RANDOM ... and now I have blog randomizers for both classes!
Myth http://3043.mythfolklore.net/randommf.html
India http://4993.mythfolklore.net/randomie.html
whoo-hoo!!! :-)
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Something else fun to share with students! In fact, I think I will call it #GPPOTD :-)
 
Watch the rise of human cities, beginning with [arguably] the world’s first city in 3700 BC and continuing up to the present. Use the controls at the bottom to pause/resume the map and to move back and forth in time. The history of urbanization, 3700 BC – 2000 AD (full-screen version) full screen / video […]
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This is compelling to watch, especially at the default speed.
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I definitely need to check this out!
 
This is a fabulous New Yorker article about a spectacular podcast: Invisibilia. Season 2 just finished and I am tempted to go back through the entire season again.

What is the power that lies behind their stories? The article is right on in saying that the power comes from the belief that people can change.

"And the people-can-change message, combined with the second season’s mightier ambition—the focus on systems, societies, norms, and the world we actually live in—can lead us to understand more intuitively and meaningfully that systems can change. This is especially encouraging, because we’ve got some institutions that desperately need changing. "

Indeed, there is a lot that needs changing around here, and it all starts with people. I could start giving a bunch of examples from Season 2 of such moving changes, but I'll leave that for another post. Just go to your favorite podcast application and download the whole season and get inspired!
With the help of a new co-host, the blockbuster podcast, about the unseen forces that shape our lives, has grown even more ambitious.
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Season one was good stuff, good podcast!
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I'm no fan of Common Core, but this right-wing Common Core paranoia is hilarious... there are LOTS of real reasons to loathe the Common Core, but this is not one of them, ha ha.
http://www.snopes.com/students-praise-allah-common-core/
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One person's prayer is another person's terrorism... :-)
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I wanted to have a new project for the semester, so I've decided to make proverb posters with proverbs from India. The first one is from a proverb in a Tamil collection that I found at Hathi Trust:
The beauty of the mind appears in the face.

http://goproverbs.blogspot.com/2016/08/poster-beauty-of-mind.html
From Tamil Proverbs collected and translated by P. Percival: 9. The beauty of the mind appears in the face. Photo: Tamil woman working in a tea plantation in central Sri Lanka. Photo by Christophe Meneboeuf.
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