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Lachlan Rogers
Works at Universität Ulm
Lives in Wiblingen
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Lachlan Rogers

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What a fun proposal for a LEGO set!  They're more than half way to the review stage, but need more supporters.  Perhaps worth creating a LEGO Ideas account?
  All you need is love...and LEGO! If you truly like this model, please support, but even more importantly, please share on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media! No model...
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Done and done!
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Lachlan Rogers

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The High Line rates as one of my favourite "urban renewal" projects ever.  It has captivated my imagination ever since I first read about the completion of its first stage, and my infatuation has grown as I learnt more about it.  It was a natural "number one" on my list of things-to-see-in-New-York-outside-business-hours-to-fit-around-busy-conference-schedule. 

The High Line was originally constructed as an elevated railway line to get heavy freight traffic out of the way of cars and pedestrians on the streets of western Manhattan.  As the industrial nature of this part of New York disappeared, the railway ceased to run in the 1980s.  For two decades the elevated line was an abandoned space within the city, and it became a self-seeded wild "garden".  The recent conversion to an elevated linear park and recreational path has been done with care, and many of the planted species were deliberately chosen to reflect the character of the disused railway.

I walked the entire park from north to south while the sun set and the dusk light lingered beautifully for urban photography.  Then I walked the entire path back again, and was thwarted at the final few hundred metres which had already closed for the night. 
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Sorry mate! I was in NY for a conference (META'15), and didn't have much time for visiting excursions. I caught up with some colleagues at Harvard, but that's in the opposite direction. 
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Lachlan Rogers

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It feels time for a regional ‪#‎potw‬. Pigeons have commandeered this tower at one end of the Ehinger Tor (Gate towards Ehingen), which was built in the middle 1800s. It was part of a large circumference wall that was built around Ulm and Neu Ulm to form a fortress that was intended to defend against the French. Decades ago the adjoining wall sections were demolished for roads and residential buildings, and so today this gate stands in isolation. It is one of the main bus/tram interchanges, and I pass it every day on my commute to work.
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+Shannon Roy I cropped a bit from the original frame, and it wasn't easy to make it feel "right".  A big part of the problem is the 6-way traffic intersection that wraps around the front of this gate, making it necessary to compose around the traffic light poles and road signs and tram wires.  I've had roughly this image in mind for months, but the actual photographing turned out to be trickier than expected.  I might try moving the bird around to see if it does improve things.
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Lachlan Rogers

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I got out of bed far too early this morning due to a daughter who was woken by the early summer sun. Things were already feeling a bit surreal and then the kids started fighting for "turns" of my Periodic Table of the Elements fridge magnet. I bet the people who put it in my conference promo bag had no inkling of its fate. We had a brief impromptu science lesson on the couch.

It was entertaining to hear my 4-year-old son a little later explaining excitedly: "Mummy, look at this! It has oxygen and - what was that one - nitrogen. They are in the air!" 
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Looks like great fun...
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As an Australian, I find the dramatic transformation of spring in Ulm fairly stunning.  In winter everything is either stark monochrome when there's snow, or dull grey when it melts.  The last few weeks have turned everything technicolour! 
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So glad you have this to enjoy. We have gray monochrome at the moment!
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Sure enough, there's snow at home! After some weeks enjoying the Australian summer, this transition is dramatic. There was no snow around Frankfurt, and even Stuttgart only had patches of snow. Ulm is blanketed white, and it's beautiful.

Today reached a maximum of about -3 degrees, and I foolishly forgot my coat and gloves as I left for work! I'm terribly out of practice for this thing called "winter". Luckily the bus was on time and was heated - but even then I doubt I'll repeat that mistake in a hurry! 
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Lachlan Rogers

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Since I was in New York for a conference, any sight-seeing had to be squeezed into non-business-hours times of the day.  Luckily, such times are actually the best for photography.
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On the ground in New York, after a gentle detour over the Great Lakes to avoid some building storms. I think it's obvious why I prefer the #windowseat ... 
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My ‪#‎potw‬ has been revised at the last minute, because eating these Bodensee strawberries this evening was a revelation. Yes, they are as dark and richly coloured as this photo suggests. Yes, they are nearly black all the way through (like a black cherry). And yes, even after 3 summers of Germany strawberry gluttony these are undoubtedly the best I've ever eaten.
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They look fake...and delicious!
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I regularly fall behind with my photo organisation, which is a shame because I try to operate by the principle "if I can't find it quickly when I want to show it, then the photo should not be taking up hard drive space!". The task involves systematic file renaming, tagging, culling, sometimes raw processing, rating, and sensibly archiving in meaningful directories. Sadly, it is usually more fun to just go and take some more photos!

So here's an idea that I hope can be a catalyst for me. I'm going to try sharing a photo of the week (‪#‎potw‬), which will be my personal favourite. The catch is that it must come from the organised photos from the last 7 days, and not from my "import" directory. I know that "photo-a-day" challenges already exist, but there's no way I can maintain that level of activity. This will be something slightly different. If any of you like the idea then feel free to play along!

This first #potw is a sunset view out the dining room window, looking over Kuhberg. This hill on the west side of Ulm is an extended ridge that follows the Danube River. Today Kuhberg is a mostly residential suburb of Ulm, but 150 years ago it was part of the defences of the city. Two forts were constructed in the middle 1800s, one at the top and one half way down to the city. These were never really used in battle, but the Fort Oberer Kuhberg was used from 1933 to 1935 as a concentration camp primarily for political opponents of the Nazi regime. I always find it slightly strange to realise that the view would have often been this majestic even during the war.
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As you might have noticed I love sunsets!
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I oppose the death penalty in all forms for any reason.  Tolkien expressed deep truth when he wrote these words from Gandalf: “Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.”

I also deplore the inconsistency of Australia's (politically and socially) defence of human rights.  This article gets much more interesting half way down, when it contrasts the recent rhetoric against sentiments surrounding the execution of Bali Bombers.  It is also illustrative to see the similar (and flawed) narratives that unite Indonesian executions and Australian mandatory and indefinite detention of innocent people.
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This week I've been at a conference/project-meeting for a European Commission collaborative research activity on Quantum Systems. The venue was the excellent Institute for Photonics (ICFO) in Barcelona, and we rearranged the schedule this morning to allow the coffee-break to coincide with maximum coverage of the solar eclipse. A stiff wind was blowing clouds in from the Mediterranean, but we did end up getting a decent view.
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Oh Clansi! Was thinking of you Lach when we saw it on the news...
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Currently
Wiblingen
Previously
Morisset - Canberra - Mandalong
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Physicist
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  • Universität Ulm
    Postdoc, 2012 - present
  • Avondale College
    Lecturer, 2011 - 2012
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Fantastic Thai food in generous portions. The seating looks a bit cramped, but I've only had take-away. Excellent take-away service: they pack components of some meals separately so that you avoid soggy or over-cooked bits. It is popular with locals so queues can get a bit long, but food is still ready within 25 mins. They don't take cards, so you'll need cash.
Food: ExcellentDecor: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
1 review
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