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L. Wynholds
Attends University of California, Los Angeles
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Samsung's War at Home

"The story of the two women, and dozens of Samsung workers with leukemia and other rare cancers, is now a very public one in South Korea. In February and March, Koreans could see two movies depicting the seven-year battle led by the Hwangs and other families against Korea’s biggest and most influential corporation."

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-04-10/deaths-at-samsung-alter-south-koreas-corporate-is-king-mindset#r=hp-ls
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Everyday Sexism in Academia
Earlier today, I co-hosted a panel discussion by +STEM Women on G+ on Everyday Sexism in Academia, along with Dr +Buddhini Samarasinghe a Molecular Biologist from the UK. Our guests were Professor +Rajini Rao PhD  in Biochemistry who runs her own lab at Johns Hopkins University USA, and Dr +Tommy Leung, Evolutionary Biologist with the University of New England, Australia. 

We discussed the sociological definition of everyday sexism, which demonstrates how everyday social exchanges between individuals are connected to institutional discrimination. Specifically, how conversations between academic colleagues that are sometimes called "benevolent" or "unintentional" sexism, are actually the outcome of systemic issues of gender inequality. This includes "jokes" that play on a woman's gender and sexuality ("You're a cheap date"); complimenting a woman on her looks and propositioning a junior colleague at a conference; and critiquing a woman scientist for the way she speaks, such as saying she's "too aggressive" in negotiations or "not nice enough" when addressing sexism (this is often known as "tone policing").

We also covered the recent case where the Journal of Proteomics published a photo of a bare chested woman in an abstract to promote a scientific paper (more on this later but you can read our article on our STEM Woman website http://goo.gl/GV4EvA). Finally we discussed how, even in professional contexts, people often discuss women scientists as mothers and wives first, rather than focusing on their professional achievements. For example in The New York Times obituary of rocket scientist Yvonne Brill (http://goo.gl/PRt6Ma).

Everyday sexism shows that women's gender is a both a barrier to professional recognition, as well as a heavily policed focal point of scrutiny.

People think these seemingly innocuous examples of sexism are subjective - that women should just take a joke and not be "so sensitive." We showed how social science actually connects these everyday comments to the professional barriers that women face in their scientific careers. This includes women's pay, their career progression and professional esteem, their publications, women's contribution and participation in STEM, and other more overt forms of workplace discrimination and sexual harassment.

#sociology #gender #feminism #science #stem #stemwomen #womeninstem
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L. Wynholds

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Remember that Maurice Sendak tried to illustrate The Hobbit? Sendak worked on sample artwork for the proposed 30th anniversary deluxe edition of the epic fantasy novel. Though his illustrations of The Hobbit were never published, they're pure delight for the fan of fantasy and children's literature! http://on.nypl.org/1qpLrCV
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Have them in circles
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L. Wynholds

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On The Shoulders of Giants

♀ A sepia print of an Indian woman, a Japanese woman and a woman from Syria, dated 1885. What do they have in common? Extraordinarily, each was the first licensed female medical doctor in their country of origin. They were trained at the Women's Medical College in Pennsylvania, the first of its kind in the country. This was a time before women had the right to vote. If they did attend college at all, it was at the risk of contracting "neuralgia, uterine disease, hysteria, and other derangements of the nervous system” (according to Harvard gynecologist Edward H. Clarke). 

An all-woman medical school was first proposed in 1846, supported by the Quakers and the feminist movement. Dr. Ellwood Harvey, one of the early teaching faculty, daringly smuggled out a slave, Ann Maria Weems, dressed as a male buggy driver, from right outside the White House. With his reward money, he bought his students a  papier maché dissection mannequin. Eventually, poverty forced him to quit teaching, but he still helped out with odd jobs. What a magnificent man!  

Fate and fortune were to buffet Ms. Joshi's life. Married at age 9 to a man 11 years older, her husband turned out to be surprisingly progressive. After she lost her first child at age 14, she vowed to render to her "poor suffering country women the true medical aid they so sadly stand in need of and which they would rather die than accept at the hands of a male physician". She was first offered a scholarship by a missionary on condition that she converted to Christianity. When she demurred, a wealthy socialite from New Jersey stepped in and financed her education. She is believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil. I didn't arrive until 1983 ;)

Times were tough then. The fate of these three intrepid pioneers was a sad one. Joshi died of tuberculosis in India at the age of 21, without ever practicing. Fittingly, her husband sent her ashes back to America. Islambouli was not heard of again, likely because she was never allowed to practice in her home country. Although Okami rose to the position of head of gynecology at a Tokyo hospital, she resigned two years later when the Emperor of Japan refused to meet her because she was a woman. 

Times have changed. My own mother was married at the age of 13 to a man also 11 years her senior. My father recalls helping my mother with her geography homework in high school. She never did attend college, despite being a charismatic woman with quicksilver wit and efficiency. Little wonder then, when I was accepted into graduate school in the US, unmarried and 21 years young, my parents staunchly stood behind me against the dire predictions of friends and relatives ("She'll come back with a yellow haired American!" "Haven't you read Cosmopolitan magazine? They are all perverts there!"). Happily, I escaped perversion, earned my doctoral degree and even gained a supportive spouse of my own. In 2004, I became only the 103rd woman to be promoted to Professor in the 111-year history of the Johns Hopkins medical school, and the first in my department, the oldest Physiology department in the country. If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants

#STEMwomen   #ScienceEveryday  

More reading: http://www.pri.org/stories/2013-07-15/historical-photos-circulating-depict-women-medical-pioneers
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Neat!
 
My talk Structured data NOW: seeding schema.org in library systems as recorded at code4lib 2014 earlier this week.

The audio is excellent and the video captured the slides; nice work by Cary Gordon! You can decide what you think about the content and delivery :)

#schemaorg   #libraries   #rdfa   #c4l14  
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US citizens: Please help block this attempt to derail federal open-access policies.

#oa #openaccess #firstact
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A Primer on Data Backup for Small- to Medium-Sized Companies (Video) http://owl.li/2DZZUu
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Have them in circles
243 people
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  • University of California, Los Angeles
    Information Studies, 2009 - present
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Graduate Student in Information Studies, researching data practices in the sciences
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Inside Google+: how the search giant plans to go social
arstechnica.com

Google formally makes its pitch to become a major force in social networking with the unveiling of Google+ to a limited public beta. Some ma

The Naked Barbie Project
www.zug.com

What would Barbie look like naked? We find out by creating the world's first fully nude Barbie doll.