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L. Wynholds
Attends University of California, Los Angeles
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0VzQaNkN7Y

I can't say I like the sunglasses, but the song sums up my month pretty well...
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The data suggests that many back problems originate from evolving to stand upright.
 
It seems that how well-adapted we are to walking upright affects how likely we are to suffer with lower back pain. Scientists from the University of Aberdeen and Simon Fraser University in Canada analysed and compared the shapes of spinal bones from chimpanzees, orangutans and ancient humans to investigate the relationship between bone shape, upright movement and spinal health. 

Prof Mark Collard from Aberdeen commented "Our findings show that the vertebrae of humans with disc problems are closer in shape to those of our closest ape relatives, the chimpanzee, than are the vertebrae of humans without disc problems."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-32452250
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THE TIGERS OF WRATH
ARE WISER THAN THE
HORSES OF INSTRUCTION
From Malcolm McLaren and the Angry Brigade to Madness and Heathcote Williams by way of George Melly’s garage, Alexis Petridis traces the story of Britain’s graffiti pioneers
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Ugly story about a commercial truck killing a cyclist  in SF (and the police failing to investigate)...
Ron Ng originally shared:
 
So upsetting at so many levels
The attorneys for Amelie Le Moullac's family say the lawsuit is 'their last chance for justice.'
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Have them in circles
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L. Wynholds

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PBS NewsHour shares how U.S. Internet speeds and prices compare to the rest of the world and how @NYPL gets New Yorkers online: http://on.nypl.org/1Drcdh8
Even though the Internet was invented in the United States, Americans pay the most in the world for broadband access. And it’s not exactly blazing fast. So why are Americans paying more for slower service?
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I've been wondering if the metabolism of neo-nicotinoids in animals results in an increased cyanide load on the kidneys (because that occurs with nicotine)...is that information available anywhere?
 
Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

"Even if you’re not a lover of bees or honey, you should know that bees are critically important to our food supply. And two new studies published in the journal Nature add to the evidence that overuse of neonicotinoid pesticides may also be contributing to the decline of bees." Read more from Allison Aubrey via NPR.
Two new studies published in the journal Nature point to a connection between a class of insecticides known as neonicotinoids and a decline in bee health. What's bad for bees is bad for crops, too.
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Apparently the data breaches of Target, Sony, Home Depot and a host of others weren't sufficient to convince Anthem to encrypt patient Social Security numbers.
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A storm has hit California, but that’s not going to end the ‘worst drought in a generation’ that is turning much of the centre of the state into a dust bowl. Chris McGreal reports on the drought bringing one of the richest states in America to its knees
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I woke up this morning worrying about whether time ordered sequential dependencies are adequately accounted for in common statistical/probabilistic approaches.  Specifically, it seems like the sequential dependencies of place and time are not well represented in discussions of outcomes.

The probabilities of any given outcome is so entangled in the the history of the present contexts.  For example, if a parent should produce a child, the child occupies physical space and time in such a way that it changes the probability of other future outcomes.   Being alive has strong contextual and sequential dependencies.  Any one outcome can potentially affect every future outcome.  At the heart of the problem is an approach to probabilities that leaves interdependent sets unsolvable.

Multiverses (e.g. parallel universes) are theoretically possible, but as far as I can tell, the math breaks down around problems of sequential order and physical place.  The theoretical existence of parallel universes looks more like an artifact of how probability has been defined: it is looking at all potential outcomes from one point in space and time. 

The messiness with parallel universe theory involves the question of  how to assemble individual points of probability in space and time into a set when each individual outcome has contextual dependencies that affect the probability of all outcomes to follow. 

The evidence suggests that universes are like snowflakes, and even more unlikely for any two to be identical.  If they are so rare as to be non-existent, then why is it such a popular trope in science fiction?  Is it about hoping that we could go back and change moments of the past?  Is it about what might have been? Is it an acknowledgment of how powerless we feel to be decision makers in face of these dependencies?  Is it just another way to look at fate?  Thoughts?

(Photo of the Omega Nebula CC-BY the European Southern Observatory)
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Fears rise in the US that talented early career scientists are being driven out of the sector because of lack of opportunities
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Have them in circles
256 people
Patrick Keilty's profile photo
Matthew Jabaily's profile photo
K.R. Roberto's profile photo
Tim Reiff's profile photo
Eric S. Riley's profile photo
Dina Finato's profile photo
Peter Norlander's profile photo
Becca Mayernik's profile photo
Dan Scott's profile photo
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  • University of California, Los Angeles
    Information Studies, 2009 - present
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Graduate Student in Information Studies, researching data practices in the sciences
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Graduate student at UCLA in Information Studies

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MLIS graduate of University of Wisconsin - Madison SLIS
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Inside Google+: how the search giant plans to go social
arstechnica.com

Google formally makes its pitch to become a major force in social networking with the unveiling of Google+ to a limited public beta. Some ma

The Naked Barbie Project
www.zug.com

What would Barbie look like naked? We find out by creating the world's first fully nude Barbie doll.