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Kyle Smaagard
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Kyle Smaagard

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I just don't see how this could scale at all and be profitable.
Facebook is getting in on the digital assistant game currently occupied by the likes of Google Now, Apple's Siri, and Microsoft's Cortana. But the social n... by Bertel King, Jr. in Applications, News
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Ummm... Limit one per customer apparently? #windows10  
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Did not know this... Nice!
 
Pro-Tip: Edit values while debugging with Android Studio

1. Set a breakpoint, attach the debugger, wait for the breakpoint to be hit
2. Select a variable, right click -> set value (or hit F2)
3. Resume Program
4. Profit

#androidDev
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My favorite line:
"The only reason coders' computers work better than non-coders' computers is coders know computers are schizophrenic little children with auto-immune diseases and we don't beat them when they're bad"

I still don't understand how people break computers so badly or so quickly!
 
Very accurate description of what coding for a living feels like (probably way too many times.)
Every programmer starts out writing some perfect little snowflake like this. Then they're told on Friday they need to have six hundred snowflakes written by Tuesday, so they cheat a bit here and there and maybe copy a few snowflakes and try to stick them together or they have to ask a coworker to work on one who melts it and then all the programmers' snowflakes get dumped together in some inscrutable shape and somebody leans a Picasso on it because nobody wants to see the cat urine soaking into all your broken snowflakes melting in the light of day. Next week, everybody shovels more snow on it to keep the Picasso from falling over.
But, for the sake of the argument, can we agree that stress and insanity are bad things? Awesome. Welcome to programming.
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I could only find 1.6 mm wire and it wouldn't fit so I used 1 mm and that worked great.
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"Montgomery has the capability of becoming an epicenter of cyber; another Silicon Valley of cyber,"

Hahahahahah
Cyber College has potential to be another Hyundai, Montgomery mayor says
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Major #GoogleNowFail ... Now I'm here an hour early...
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If you love dogs...
 
GoFundMe For Trigger http://www.gofundme.com/surgeryfortrigger

So today my wife received the following message from a close family friend. I have never really been a believer in GoFundMe because I could always see a means to hustle people out of their money by running a scam. However, in this case things seem to be different. In short, our friend reached out to the person running the campaign and verified the situation, before sending this text. I have a social platform with folks who find me interesting, so why not use this reach to help get the word out to help another.  

In short: A beautiful dog is sick and the owner needs help for the surgery. You can read it all here and donate if you have the means: http://www.gofundme.com/surgeryfortrigger
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Good to hear +Mike Wallace​!
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Trust me when I say "You need one of these"
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Excellent, thoughtful post on reality vs the hype-machine.
 
Ever since seeing this article a few days ago, it's been bugging me. We know that self-driving cars will have to solve real-life "trolley problems:" those favorite hypotheticals of Philosophy 101 classes wherein you have to make a choice between saving, say, one person's life or five, or saving five people's lives by pushing another person off a bridge, or things like that. And ethicists (and even more so, the media) have spent a lot of time talking about how impossible it will be to ever trust computers with such decisions, and why, therefore, autonomous machines are frightening.

What bugs me about this is that we make these kinds of decisions all the time. There are plenty of concrete, real-world cases that actually happen: do you swerve into a tree rather than hit a pedestrian? (That's greatly increasing the risk to your life -- and your passengers' -- to save another person)

I think that part of the reason that we're so nervous about computerizing these ethical decisions is not so much that they're hard, as that doing this would require us to be very explicit about how we want these decisions made -- and people tend to talk around that very explicit decision, because when they do, it tends to reveal that their actual preferences aren't the same as the ones they want their neighbors to think they have.

For example: I suspect that most people, if driving alone in a vehicle, will go to fairly significant lengths to avoid hitting a pedestrian, including putting themselves at risk by hitting a tree or running into a ditch. I suspect that if the pedestrian is pushing a stroller with a baby, they'll feel even more strongly this way. But as soon as you have passengers in the car, things change: what if it's your spouse? Your children? What if you don't particularly like your spouse?

Or we can phrase it in the way that the headline below does: "Will your self-driving car be programmed to kill you if it means saving more strangers?" This phrasing is deliberately chosen to trigger a revulsion, and if I phrase it instead the way I did above -- in terms of running into a tree to avoid a pedestrian -- your answer might be different. The phrasing in the headline, on the other hand, seems to tap into a fear of loss of autonomy, which I often hear around other parts of discussions of the future of cars. Here's a place where a decision which you normally make -- based on secret factors which only you, in your heart, know, and which nobody else will ever know for sure -- is instead going to be made by someone else, and not necessarily to your advantage. We all suspect that it would sometimes make that decision in a way that, if we were making it secret (and with the plausible deniability that comes from it being hard to operate a car during an emergency), we might make quite differently.

Oddly, if you think about how we would feel about such decisions being made by a human taxi driver, people's reactions seem different, even though there's the same loss of autonomy, and now instead of a rule you can understand, you're subject to the driver's secret decisions. 

I suspect that the truth is this:

Most people would go to more lengths than they expect to save a life that they in some way cared about.

Most people would go to more lengths than they are willing to admit to save their own life: their actual balance, in the clinch, between protecting themselves and protecting others isn't the one they say it is. And most people secretly suspect that this is true, which is why the notion of the car "being programmed to kill you" in order to save other people's lives -- taking away that last chance to change your mind -- is frightening.

Most people's calculus about the lives in question is actually fairly complex, and may vary from day to day. But people's immediate conscious thoughts -- who they're happy with, who they're mad at -- may not accurately reflect what they would end up doing.

And so what's frightening about this isn't that the decision would be made by a third party, but that even if we ourselves individually made the decision, setting the knobs and dials of our car's Ethics-O-Meter every morning, we would be forcing ourselves to explicitly state what we really wanted to happen, and commit ourselves, staking our own lives and those of others on it. The opportunity to have a private calculus of life and death would go away.

As a side note, for cars this is less actually relevant, because there are actually very few cases in which you would have to choose between hitting a pedestrian and crashing into a tree which didn't come from driver inattention or other unsafe driving behaviors leading to loss of vehicle control -- precisely the sorts of things which self-driving cars don't have. So these mortal cases would be vanishingly rarer than they are in our daily lives, which is precisely where the advantage of self-driving cars comes from.

For robotic weapons such as armed drones, of course, these questions happen all the time. But in that case, we have a simple ethical answer as well: if you program a drone to kill everyone matching a certain pattern in a certain area, and it does so, then the moral fault lies with the person who launched it; the device may be more complex (and trigger our subconscious identification of it as being a "sort-of animate entity," as our minds tend to do), but ultimately it's no more a moral or ethical decision agent than a spear that we've thrown at someone, once it's left our hand and is on its mortal flight.

With the cars, the choice of the programming of ethics is the point at which these decisions are made. This programming may be erroneous, or it may fail in circumstances beyond those which were originally foreseen (and what planning for life and death doesn't?), but ultimately, ethical programming is just like any other kind of programming: you tell it you want X, and it will deliver X for you. If X was not what you really wanted, that's because you were dishonest with the computer.

The real challenge is this: if we agree on a standard ethical programming for cars, we have to agree and deal with the fact that we don't all want the same thing. If we each program our own car's ethical bounds, then we each have that individual responsibility. And in either case, these cars give us the practical requirement to be completely explicit and precise about what we do, and don't, want to happen when faced with a real-life trolley problem.
The computer brains inside autonomous vehicles will be fast enough to make life-or-death decisions. But should they? A bioethicist weighs in on a thorny problem of the dawning robot age.
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That would be fun :)
 
Really fun stuff.. Swift language allows to use emoticons to name functions and vars. 
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I'll probably be buying some of these...
 
This is the Nest Cam and the New Nest App for Android.

I'll be getting this to go with my thermostat 
You know that story from earlier today that suggested Nest may unveil a new wireless camera at next week's event? This is the camera. This is the Nest Cam. As you can see from the image above, it looks quite similar to a Dropcam, which would make sense, since Nest now owns Dropcam and has access ...
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The Player of Games - Books on Google Play
market.android.com

The Culture - a human/machine symbiotic society - has thrown up many great Game Players, and one of the greatest is Gurgeh. Jernau Morat Gur

Consider Phlebas - Books on Google Play
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"Dazzlingly original." -- Daily Mail "Gripping, touching and funny." -- TLS The war raged across the galaxy. Billions had died, billions mo

Review: 'House of Wolves' Turned Me From A Lapsed Player Into A 'Destiny...
www.forbes.com

I wanted to like Destiny, back in September of 2014. I like a space opera no matter how you slice it, and Bungie has a way with them. It had

Android Community
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Android Community: Tracking the Android Platform

Sky Demo - App Android su Google Play
market.android.com

Demo of Sky.Source available at: https://github.com/domokit/sky_sdkThis version is based on the dart_summit branch: https://github.com/domok

Android System WebView - Android Apps on Google Play
market.android.com

Android Webview is a system component powered by Chrome that allows Android apps to display web content. This component is pre-installed on

Google Connectivity Services - Android Apps on Google Play
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Google Connectivity Services helps Android handle network connections. Keep it updated to ensure your device has the latest networking capab

SuperBeam | WiFi Direct Share – Android Apps on Google Play
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Powered by LiveQoSSuperBeam is the easiest and fastest way to share large files between Android devices using WiFi direct. Devices can be pa

Keyline Pushing - Android Apps on Google Play
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In Material Design, all components align to an 8dp square baseline grid, except type and toolbar iconography, which align to a 4dp square ba

The Hobbit - Books on Google Play
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Now a major motion picture A great modern classic and the prelude to THE LORD OF THE RINGS Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortab

Cloud Console – Aplicaţii Android pe Google Play
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The Cloud Console enables you to manage your solution running on the Google Cloud Platform directly from your Android phone or tablet:* Chec

Armageddon - Android-Apps auf Google Play
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One day, civilization has to leave its home, their planet. It's happening now, while you drink your coffee and eat cake... Once in a million

Live Die Repeat: Edge of Tomorrow
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An alien race, undefeatable by any existing military unit, has launched a relentless attack on Earth, and Major William Cage (Tom Cruise) fi

The Interview
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In the action-comedy The Interview, Dave Skylark (James Franco) and his producer Aaron Rapoport (Seth Rogen) run the popular celebrity tablo

Unwind
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In a society where unwanted teens are salvaged for their body parts, three runaways fight the system that would "unwind" them Connor's pare

UnWholly
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Rife with action and suspense, this riveting companion to the perennially popular Unwind challenges assumptions about where life begins and

UnSouled
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The story that began with Unwind continues. Connor and Lev are on the run after the destruction of the Graveyard, the last safe haven for A

UnDivided
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Teens control the fate of America in the fourth and final book in the New York Times bestselling Unwind dystology by Neal Shusterman. Proac

What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions
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From the creator of the wildly popular webcomic xkcd, hilarious and informative answers to important questions you probably never thought to

The Maze Runner (Maze Runner, Book One)
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Read the first book in the #1 New York Times bestselling Maze Runner series, perfect for fans of The Hunger Games and Divergent. The Maze Ru

Pretty good food, I had the stromboli which probably would have been better if the marinara want so plain. Very good service though. Fiancée had the chicken Alfredo and said it was delicious.
Public - 3 weeks ago
reviewed 3 weeks ago
Interesting style of getting your food but fun. Probably would be annoying if it were busy.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Wow, this was delicious. I'm not a rabid fan of Thai but i decided to give out a shot. I really wanted the coco shrimp appetizer but was alone so went with the Thai 9 fried rice. Looking story short, it was delicious. I chose a spice level of 4 out of 9 which was almost too spicy but good with beer. More spicy than spicy Asian songs at bdubs. Will be coming here again!
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
It's alright, I wasn't a huge fan of the wings but the prices are reasonable and the wings are big
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
212 reviews
Map
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Map
Good beer selection but I wasn't a fan of the food. The best stew was mediocre and, surprisingly, only came with a single roll.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Best wings ever. You have to try the honey gold one if you come here.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Not bad, worth the try of you are from out of town, chili with spaghetti is something i would never have thought to try.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago