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Kurone Shizuhi
Attends Murdoch University
Lives in Singapore
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I have placed together a number of Japanese learning resources that I have used over the past 10 years of my journey. I hope that it will be of use to whoever who needs it :)

#Japanese  

Feel free to comment for questions, clarifications, recommendations, or just to share your story.
Read all the way to the end for Tips and Tricks too! Must-Haves Japanese/English Dictionary - Offline Dictionary for Android - Offline Dictionary for Apple - Pop-up dictionary for Chrome - Pop-...
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Good morning
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My neighbour doesn’t speak English, but her kindness needs no translation

Great story

"When she found out I was facing heart surgery, my elderly neighbour took it upon herself to deliver a homemade meal to my front door"

#canada   #china  
When she found out I was facing heart surgery, my elderly neighbour took it upon herself to deliver a homemade meal to my front door
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That is a wonderful story. I love hearing about this kind of thing.
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This was entertaining.
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Cute cat is the star Tsum Tsum character in this Japanese home!

This cat has incredible patience to pose with all these dolls.
Meet the cat who can stack it like a Disney Tsum Tsum character in all sorts of situations!
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The King of Norway has delivered an impassioned speech in favour of LGBT rights and the plight of refugees in the country.
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That made me laugh.
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Interesting to see Japan doing this.
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Awww this is so cute! They should also try the Labor Pains simulation! Let's see how far they can tolerate the pain ;)
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The best izakaya in Tokyo http://tfg.nu/kagaya also has frog puppet show.
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(subtitles can be switched on)
Would you choose to build a house on top of an unfinished foundation? Of course not. Why, then, do we rush students through education when they haven't always grasped the basics? Yes, it's complicated, but educator Sal Khan shares his plan to turn struggling students into scholars by helping them master concepts at their own pace. (This talk comes from the PBS special "TED Talks: Education Revolution" which premieres Tuesday, September 13.)
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How the #doujinshi culture of idea theft encourages originality http://tfg.nu/doujinshi
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Fascinating.
 
Some interesting language bits for your day

In English, it sounds strange to say "the green, great dragon" instead of "the great, green dragon." Why?

Take a look at the first picture, a note which +Don McArthur shared. This rule probably isn't entirely universal (I'm sure that, with some time, I could come up with a counterexample), but it's pretty close to it: adjectives in English, and in other languages as well, follow a particular order.

This kind of thing is an example of linguistic spectra. In this case, it's a spectrum of binding strength: some modifiers "bind" more strongly to the things they modify, affecting their nature more intrinsically, and languages systematically place them closer to the things which they modify. For example, we apparently see color as a more intrinsic attribute of a thing than size, because size can change more easily; thus we have a great (green dragon) rather than a green (great dragon).

My favorite example of linguistic spectra comes from a phenomenon called split ergativity. Consider the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs:

Intransitive: "noun(I) verbed"
Transitive: "noun(T1) verbed noun(T2)"

Languages mark these nouns in different ways. If you speak any Germanic or Romance language, for example, you would say that I and T1 are both subjects of their sentences, and T2 is an object. These languages mark that behavior in various ways. In English, we do it mostly with word order – "Anna killed Clara" and "Clara killed Anna" have different meanings. With pronouns, we actually use different words: subjects like "I ate" or "I ate Bob," and objects like "Bob ate me." Other Indo-European languages like Latin take this farther, and explicitly mark what's called "case:" a change in the shape of a noun to indicate its role in a sentence. For example, in Latin you would say

"Anna eduit" ("Anna ate")
"Anna eduit Claram" ("Anna ate Clara" – note the "-m" indicating that Clara is a direct object)

Latin doesn't care as much about word order; "Claram eduit Anna" would still mean that Anna ate Clara, it would just be a kind of unusual way to say it. (Sort of like saying "Clara, Anna ate" in English)

What's important here is that these languages treat the subjects of transitive and intransitive sentences in the same way, and the objects of intransitive sentences differently. Do all languages do this?

No! Another way to do it is what's called ergative-absolutive. In languages like Turkish, the subjects of intransitive sentences are treated the same way as the objects of transitive sentences, and it's the subjects of transitive sentences which are different.

What's the idea here? It's because both the intransitive subjects and the transitive objects are the ones being affected by the verb, while the transitive subject is staying the same but affecting someone else. In these languages, instead of distinguishing subjects and objects (highlighting who or what performed an action), we distinguish "agents" and "patients" – highlighting who or what was changed by an action.

(In languages like these which use case markings on words to distinguish them, the agent is in what's called the "absolutive" case, and the patient "ergative," thus the name. In languages like Latin and English, subjects are "nominative" and objects are "accusative," so these are called nominative-accusative languages)


Are there any other options? Well, we're trying to group three things, so there are a few possibilities. (See the second picture...)

1. Intransitive subject, transitive subject, and transitive object are all the same.
2. Subjects are the same, objects are different. (English, German, Latin)
3. Agents are the same, patients are different. (Turkish, Tibetan, Pashto)
4. Things in transitive sentences are the same, things in intransitive sentences are different.
5. All three are different.

It turns out that options 1 and 4 don't happen, and for a simple reason: if you had no way to tell apart a transitive subject from an object, then it would never be clear just who ate whom. Option 5 does exist in a few languages, but it's not as common.

But what's interesting is that there's a sixth option, called "split ergativity," which languages like Hindi use: some verbs are nominative-accusative, and other verbs are absolutive-ergative!

This might seem incredibly confusing, at first: now you have to remember which verbs use which kind of grammar?! But it turns out that split ergative languages have a pattern to them, as well.

The rule is this: line up all the verbs in the world, and order them by how much they change the state of a thing. Maybe moving changes your state less than changing color; both of those change your state less than being born or dying.

Somewhere in the middle of this line, you will draw a border. If a verb is all about changing the state of something, it will use the absolutive-ergative rules, and grammar will distinguish the thing which was affected from the thing that wasn't; if the verb doesn't really change states much, then grammar instead distinguishes between who did it and who didn't, and you use nominative-accusative rules.

What's most fascinating to me about this is this: different split-ergative languages put the boundary in different places. But there's good evidence that all languages are using the same ordering of verbs! That is, if one language considers a verb to be "more" state-changing than another verb, chances are that all the other languages will agree as well.

So this really is another linguistic spectrum, and like the great, green dragons we started with, it also has to do with how "fundamental" we see a property as being.

The net result: the more fundamental we see a thing as being, the more tightly its modifiers bind to the thing, and the more likely we are to view a sentence that talks about it changing as really being about the thing that is being changed, rather than about the thing doing the changing.

It's one of those interesting signs of universal structures underpinning human language. 
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All musicians. I don't care whether you're classical, metal or whatever genre you are. Go watch this if it is showing in your country. Although I have only heard about their name, I decided to watch it after viewing the trailer. And thank goodness I did. It's not just about their fame. It's about how they rose up to all the shit that was dealt to them. I can't put whatever feelings I have now in words. Just go buy the tickets before they are sold out. Seriously.
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+黒音りん aww, you saded.
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Working towards being a Voice Artist :)
Introduction

I'm a lively and eccentric person who loves Languages, Cultures, Music and The Arts!

私は元気で少し風変わりなところもある人間です。言語や文化、音楽や芸術を好んでいます。

I'm also a quiet meditative thinker who's interested in Metaphysics and Psychology.

また、深く物事を考え、形而上学と心理学に興味を持っています。

I communicate via English, Chinese (Mandarin & Hokkien) and Japanese. I am hearing but am learning ASL as well.

英語や中国語や日本語などで会話出来ます。

I'm working as a Japanese Tour Guide at HIS.
H.I.S で日本語ガイドの仕事をしています。

I'm aiming to become a voice-actress.
声優を目指しています。

I might occasionally post a lot in my stream, so if you find me posting too much, just drop me a note, or feel free to un-circle me.

3DS Friend Code
3DSフレンドコード
5327-0869-0639

Girls Mode Shop Code
ガールズモールショップコード
IIG592908

Bragging rights
Japanese Language Proficiency Test N2 Cert + ABRSM Piano Grade 8 Distinction
Education
  • Murdoch University
    Bachelor of Communication in Communication & Media Studies and Web Communication, 2015 - present
  • Singapore Polytechnic
    Diploma in Music & Audio Technology, 2009 - 2012
Basic Information
Birthday
November 11