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Krzysztof Kowalczyk
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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DIY: Indie Game Dev from Napkin to Profitability - a good talk where 3 indie game developers that managed to make it work full-time share their stories and tips on development and business.

DIY: Indie Game Dev from Napkin to Profitability | BIRKETT, ROGULA, NEVILLE, BAXTER
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8095172564
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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I released version 2.3.1 of pigz windows port.

Pigz is a parallel (i.e. fast) gzip implementation.
Pigz windows port. Pigz is a parallel gzip implementation. It uses multiple cores to speed up compression and decompression. This is a Windows port made by Krzysztof Kowalczyk. Download. Download latest version : Sources are at https://github.com/kjk/pigz. Have comments or questions about this ...
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The Silver Searcher is a popular grep-like (or ack-like) utility.

It didn't have a native Windows/Visual Studio port, so I've ported it: http://blog.kowalczyk.info/software/the-silver-searcher-for-windows.html
The Silver Searcher windows port. The Silver Searcher is a like grep or ack, except faster. It's written in super-optimized C (like grep) and it's intelligent about entirely skipping files that you don't want to waste time searching (like ack). This is a Windows port made by Krzysztof Kowalczyk.
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grep like?
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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I'm playing with medium, so I wrote up my thoughts on Blink (Google's fork of WebKit): https://medium.com/my-ideas/25a947158087

Summary: it's big and it puts Apple (and WebKit) in a tough position.
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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Interview with Mike Lee

It's hard to sum up in few words but this interview with Mike Lee is quite interesting: http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/YOW-2012-Mike-Lee-New-Lemurs-Chemistry-Transdimensional-Portal-Object-Oriented-Audio

Mike Lee is a founder of Appsterdam and talks about his new company making educational games, some new audio technology (which I don't quite get) and his life philosophies.
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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How stupid rules are born

In programming field, it's not hard to find examples of mandated rules that prevent intelligent people from doing their job well. "Programmers cannot touch servers, only ops people can". "Every checkin must be reviewed by 5 people in a 1 hour meeting" etc.

When faced with counter-productive rules we get angry and wonder: "how did we get here"?

Here's how: as a knee-jerk over-reaction to something bad happening in the past and trying to prevent said bad thing happening ever again in the future, at all costs. Common sense be damned.

Here's an example: https://plus.google.com/111465598045192916635/posts/CkmmbjmvebM

To summarize: an open-source developer with many open-source projects merged a patch which caused deletion of some files for people using it.

A random guy on the internet comes to "inevitable" conclusion: we should stop releasing so much open-source code because fuck ups do not happen to people who release less code and too much free code is bad for the world. More is less and all that.

Thankfully, a random guy on the internet doesn't have a power to stop other people from releasing as much open-source as they wish, so all he has left is broadcasting his ill-considered rants.

But if he was in a position of power, he would setup a committee in charge of deciding what code is good enough to be released. In order to release code as open-source you would have to submit the code to them and get their permission.

What could possibly go wrong?

Inevitably, the committee wouldn't be staffed to handle the load, so getting permission would take longer and longer.

Power corrupts so the committee would inevitably got drunk with power and use petty, as opposed to purely technical, reasons for rejecting projects. Johnny, for example, used to be a member of ffmpeg project and has deep hatred for anything windows so rejects any project that doesn't use C99 features (which is crafty (in his mind) way of saying "doesn't compile with Visual Studio)).

That's how bureaucracy is born and that's how it ends up working: not very well.
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I read this post right after having come across Tom's post on Reddit. Tom had two points, one was on fragmentation and the other on release schedules. I don't really think the fragmentation argument holds any water. The argument on release schedules was plenty valid and TJ himself was candid in saying he didn't give it the attention it deserved and should have found another maintainer a long time ago. I appreciate not wanting to paint this as a problem for open source at large and not wanting to force a solution that wouldn't be feasible. These type of errors do add to a negative image to people still wary of open source in general. I appreciate Tom's concern for what these type of errors do in the larger context. 
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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Observation: Google sells almost as many hardware devices as Apple (https://play.google.com/store/devices).
Shop Google Play on the web. Purchase and enjoy instantly on your Android phone or tablet without the hassle of syncing.
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Kindle's MatchBook program (low-priced e-book version for paper titles) works and is well executed by Amazon.

I clicked the button, it found 6 paper books that I purchased in the past and that I can now get for Kindle for a fraction of the price (they are all $3).

I bought 2 out of 6. They are both cookboks and it's nice to have a digital version in addition to a (heavy) paper book.

I don't care much about re-buying fiction - if I've already read it, I don't feel the need to read it again.
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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Worth watching:

1. Tim Shafer talk from XOXO Festival (Tim Schafer, Double Fine - XOXO Festival (2013)). Talks about his experience funding an adventure game on Kickstarter

2. Cabel Sasser of Panic (Mac development company) talks about the history of Panic (Cabel Sasser, Panic - XOXO Festival (2013))

There are more talks from XOXO Festival that look interesting but I haven't gotten to them yet.
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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I'm playing with branch, so I used it to describe my idea of using QEMU instead of P(NACL) or asm.js: http://branch.com/b/why-not-use-qemu-instead-of-p-nacl-or-asm-js
Here's the situation so far. JavaScript is too slow for some use cases. People want a faster option for the web. Google has been working on NACL, which is a gcc-based toolchain that can compile C/C+...
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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Videos of talks from Pioneers Festival

I've just watched http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/26563903, which is about basics of how to grow a startup, from a guy who did that for Dropbox and other companies. Basics are important.

There are more talks that look interesting.

BTW: isn't the Internet wonderful? The Pioneers Festival (http://pioneersfestival.com/) happened in Vienna, Austria and I can watch it few days later in San Francisco, US. That didn't use to happen few years ago.
STARTUP CLASS - Growing your Startup (Sean Ellis):Growing your Startup recorded on USTREAM. Conference
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Krzysztof Kowalczyk

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The dark side of OAuth

Google Drive desktop just asked me to re-enter my credentials for 100th time, so I feel entitled to a rant.

I started using Google Drive because on the first look it promised to be Dropbox but cheaper.

Except Dropbox never asked me to re-enter my credentials after I finished the initial setup.

It might be basic incompetence on the part of Google programmers behind Google Drive or, as I theorize, the result of trying to fit a square peg into a round hole i.e. using OAuth with its unfortunate feature of expiring OAuth tokens and requiring to re-enter the password to generate a new one.

That works fine for web-based authentication but is terrible for desktop software. Desktop software, once configured, should shut up and do its job.

Not that I don't have things to rant about when it comes to Dropbox.

They like to go to conferences and proudly broadcast the fact that they built their desktop app in Python (and therefore use about 100x more resources than a competently written C++ app).

Dropbox successfully projects the image of the founders as being nota-bene geniuses and they raised over $250M. I find it hard to square that with the fact that they couldn't learn enough C++ (or hire a competent C++ Windows programmer) to write the app in C++ (or at least in C#, as I recommend in http://blog.kowalczyk.info/article/Which-technology-for-writing-desktop-software.html).

And if you're tempted to say that it is in fact very smart because it's so much easier to write in Python than in C++ then I agree in general case but not in this particular case.

Theirs is not a complicated app and the moment you try to write Windows desktop software in Python, you enter a world of hurt of trying to package a python code as deployable executable. It's another example of trying to fit a square peg in a round hole.
This post is inspired by a question posted on JoelOnSoftware software business forum. To paraphrase: “I'm a one person coding machine. I want to write small, consumer oriented desktop software. Which ...
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Did you really feel the pain of using x100 more resources for dropbox?

I never noticed it.

Once you solved the packaging problem once, your good to go, so I don't see why this is a deal breaker (with C# you can have unpleasant UX if the client don't have the framework, which you can guarantee not to happen with python).
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