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Béibhinn Mhodartha
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Dear people who encounter my corner of the Plusverse,

If a stranger walked into your house uninvited, shouted obscenities, threw things about, and left (or worse, got into an argument with other strangers who also showed up), you would probably not take kindly to it.

It's likewise unsettling to have someone you've never interacted with post a comment on G+ with lots of UPPERCASE and profanities, without so much as an acknowledgment that there is a person who posted that thing causing so much ire.

If you come onto one of my posts, guns blazing, expect to be blocked. Because you're being rude. And my portion of the Plusverse is not a democracy. I block people who are unable or unwilling to engage in civil discourse. This means I will not tolerate people attacking one another, making prejudiced comments, etc.

TL;DR -- don't be a dick. 
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I missed this post initially, but totally agree. The sorts of people who like to search out random articles to be an asshole in are the people who like to scream "freedom of speech" without actually understanding what it means and where it actually applies.
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Sure, photographers take a lot of photos of dogs, but did anyone ever ask dogs what they want to take pictures of? With this new “Heartography” heart monitor and photo camera system, Nikon aims to let dogs show their owners what excites and interests them by snapping a photo from their point of view every time their heart rate goes up.
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Busted... read the comments. fake all fake!
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Photographer Katie Joy Crawford has wrestled with anxiety disorder her entire life, which is why she was especially qualified to create this gripping photo series showing us what it's like to live with this burden.
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"Depression is when you can’t feel at all. Anxiety is when you feel too much. Having both is a constant war within your own mind. Having both means never winning." This is probably the best description I've ever heard.  And these images resonate all to well with me.
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This year, I decided to do something different for Memorial Day. Normally I will post stories or names of those who have served the country and have died in combat or after--which I will still do today, but with one exception. I'm only posting stories about people of color. Those who had even more at stake than their white counterparts. Who served with honor and distinction at home and abroad, even as they were reviled in their own homes by white citizens.

First up is the story of Crispus Attucks. Attucks was the first to die in the Revolution, well, in the lead up to it. Shot and killed by British soldiers during the Boston Massacre, Attucks is a perfect example of how our nation treats its heroes of color.

Born sometime around 1723 to an African slave father and a Nantucket Native American mother, he was born into slavery. In Massachusetts.

In 1850, his owner, one William Brown of Framingham, reported him as a runaway in the Boston Gazette, describing him as A Mulatto fellow, about 27 Years of Age, named Crispus, 6 feet 2 inches high, short cur'l hair, his knees nearer together than common.

Over the next 20 years, Attucks became a sailor, working on whaling crews and doing itinerant labor between, usually ropemaking. 

In 1770, Boston was an occupied city, forced to house the King's soldiers. Resentment against the Redcoats was high, especially since there was competition for part time menial labor from them, like ropemaking. 

An earlier bar fight between 3 soldiers and a group of Boston locals on Friday, March 2nd, 1770 increased tensions. Attucks was one of the locals involved. 

The following Monday, a lone Redcoat wandered into a pub, looking for extra work. Attucks and others chased him from the pub, and went looking for other soldiers nearby. The guard post located near had one soldier standing duty alone. The crowd, now numbering around 30, began pelting the guard with insults, snowballs, and sticks. 

A few minutes later, a nearby wig maker's apprentice, Edward Garrick, showed up and called to the captain of the guard, 
Captain John Goldfinch, that he had not paid his bill for his wigs. In a town already angered at having to feed, house, and support the British soldiers, this was perhaps the final tinder. 

The crowd continued to grow, until it numbered between 3-400. 

Captain Goldfinch and 6 other soldiers rushed to the aid of the guard being harassed. The 7 soldiers, with bayonets fixed, surrounded the guard house. Among them was Captain Thomas Preston. 

While accounts greatly differ, most agree that at some point, Attucks or someone near him struck Private Hugh Montgomery with something that caused him to fall and drop his musket. 

Upon rising up, Montgomery is believed to have opened fire. At that point, the other British soldiers began doing the same. Attucks fell first. 

Five men were killed. Future President John Adams, a prominent Boston lawyer, took the case of the soldiers. While being adamantly opposed to the occupation, he felt deeply that everyone deserved a fair trial. Well, at least everyone white. 

During the trials, in which Adams managed to get ALL the British soldiers acquitted, he put the full blame on the victims. Especially Attucks. The language may have changed from then to now, but it still sounds very much like the defense used by police now when they shoot and kill a man of color. The race-baiting was clear, and there was no way any jury of wealthy white men was going to convict white soldiers for shooting on a crowd of "thugs". 

Describing them as a motley rabble of saucy boys, negroes and molattoes, Irish teagues and outlandish jack tarrs, Adams blamed Attucks and named him as the primary assailant. 

Attucks with his myrmidons comes round Jockson's [Jackson's] corner, and down to the party by the Sentry-box; when the soldiers pushed the people off, this man with his party cried, do not be afraid of them, they dare not fire, kill them! kill them! knock them over! And he tried to knock their brains out. It is plain the soldiers did not leave their station, but cried to the people, stand off: now to have this reinforcement coming down under the command of a stout Molatto fellow, whose very looks, was enough to terrify any person, what had not the soldiers then to fear? He had hardiness enough to fall in upon them, and with one hand took hold of a bayonet, and with the other knocked the man down: This was the behaviour of Attucks;-to whose mad behaviour, in all probability, the dreadful carnage of that night, is chiefly to be ascribed. And it is in this manner, this town has been often treated; a Carr from Ireland, and an Attucks from Framingham, happening to be here, shall sally out upon their thoughtless enterprizes, at the head of such a rabble of Negroes, &c. as they can collect together

Crispus Attucks, the first to die in the Boston Massacre, considered the first death of the Revolution, has always been a controversial figure. Some believe him to be a martyr, some a villain. I tend towards the former myself, but whatever your feelings about him, he should be considered among those honored this Memorial Day. 

Image source: 
http://www.bostonmassacre.net/pictures/pictures5.htm
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H/t +Deven Rue
 
Giggles

Hehehehehehe


Via: Fantasy and Sci-Fi Rock My World
#giggles  
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Of course, the price is still more than I'll ever have.
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I've got a serious yarn thing going on right now. Ok, yes, yes I know that I always have a yarn thing going on, but right now it's all a little bit more intense and giddy and I have that...
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New Yorkers are opening their hearts and wallets to the Flushing kids forced to sit out their school’s end-of-year festival just because their parents did not pay a $10 fee. At least a half-dozen p...
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The Bible moralisée of Naples (c. 1340-1350, Naples, Italy) is housed in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
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Yes!
 
Hmmm, I think I need like 7 of these, one for each day of the week, because this is something a lot of people (even ones identifying as not heterosexual) have trouble grasping.

(they have bi, pan, ace, aro and poly versions!)
laughinghabit: “Say it with me now. Who you are is not determined by who you’re with. Being bisexual, pansexual, or polysexual is not dependent on who you choose to date (or not date). Your identity...
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Béibhinn's Collections
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Have her in circles
4,671 people
Liz Georges's profile photo
Samuel John's profile photo
Marc Sancho Soto's profile photo
House Taiva's profile photo
sermsiri ngiwlay's profile photo
Sephira Allen's profile photo
Kate Newton's profile photo
ADDAN maussa Daumauya's profile photo
rosy williams's profile photo
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Other names
Bevin an Broc Drannach, DreamSpun Fiber Arts, DreamSpunFiber, BevinBadger
Story
Tagline
Fiber artist, procrastinator, SCAdian, feminist, conservationist, liberal, gamer, geek of many colors.
Introduction
Things I take seriously, organized alphabetically:
  • Creativity/Inspiration
  • Environment
    • Preservation of Public Lands
    • Reduction in use of Toxic Chemicals, and improper disposal thereof
    • Research and Production of Alternate Fuels, reducing our dependence on fossil fuels
    • Wildlife & habitat conservation
  • Equality
    • Feminism
    • Gender
    • Poverty/Classism
    • Racism
    • Sexuality
  • Fiber Arts
    • Crochet
    • Dyeing
    • Felting
    • Spinning
    • Weaving
  • Gaming/Geekdom
I make a lot of public posts. I reserve the right to block people who engage in abusive language, or who tick me off. This is not a matter of censorship, I am not a government entity preventing you from speaking in a public space. This is a matter of active curation. If you don't like it, you can keep your comments to other spaces in the Plusverse and across the internet. It's a big place, I promise.
Bragging rights
Contributor to the Smithsonian Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef Exhibit (10/10 - 4/11); Hook-wielding member of the Crochet Liberation Front; once met and touched Secretariat.