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Kristin Milton
Lives in Canberra
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Basic Information
Gender
Female
Story
Tagline
Easily distracted by maps, books and other shiny things.
Introduction
“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known,” Carl Sagan

Incurably Curious
Easily Distracted
Voracious devourer of books
Spatial Professional
Mother
(All in the order they first occurred, not relative importance)

My header image is from here: http://www.john-doe.co/96092/233894/work/miss-universe
Bragging rights
The world is so full of a number of things, I’m sure we should all be as happy as kings.
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Canberra
Previously
Perth - Grand Cayman - Winnipeg
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Kristin Milton
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Discussion  - 
 
Thanks +Vicky Veritas for sharing this! Yes, here in Australia we are about to migrate to our last plate-fixed (or static) datum. This will move all our coordinates from where our continent was in 1994 (when we switched to the GDA94 datum) to where the continent will be in 2020.

Confused yet? This shift is tiny (less than 30cm on the ground in most places) - but as we move to a world where most coordinates are gathered from GPS (which is Earth fixed, not plate fixed) every year we're moving further away.
And the folks who do precision agriculture, and those who want self-driving cars care about those 30cm very, very much.
The next datum will be earth-fixed, not plate-fixed, so the coordinates will change as the continental plate moves. This means we will have to store time as well as x,y,z coordinates. There is still a lot of conversation going on about the technical implementation of this - and also, how do we treat existing data which may or may not have accurate time stored against it?

In the mean time, if your spatial data was less precise than 30cm on the ground, it won't need to shift to align. But if you are already working with coordinates that are precise to less than 10cm, you'll need to start looking into this soon...
 
Changing datums, +Kristin Milton? Sounds like fun :oP
The Earth moved for all of us but spatial wonks got out of bed and did something about it
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I think, in the first instance, it won't be a lot outside the construction industry (and they tend to use planar coordinates where this is a lot less important).  But eventually we'll all have to move.
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Discussion  - 
 
Here be pirates!
Predicting pirate attacks globally using Esri technology.
It isn't often we see geospatial in Business Insider!
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... There's only one rule that I know of, babies—God damn it, you've got to be kind ...
Be generous with your attention, that you might dispel the loneliness and isolation that divide us. Be generous with your time and money. They go farthest when freed from your own hands. Make room …
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This made me laugh this morning.
Happy Friday, plussers!
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This was in the signature block of an email today:

No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced

It made me laugh
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Might have to use that one ;)
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Opinions? Me?
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Or "why my twitter account has a pseudonym."
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Kristin Milton

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Million dollar sharks!
The headline says it all, really. What happens when a small country realises the economic benefit in protecting it's wildlife far outstrips letting it be plundered.

I recently got back from diving in the island nation of Palau and its shark enhanced waters. That’s right, not shark infested- shark enhanced. Sharks are to Palau what Orcas are to SeaWorld only …
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Protect all the sharks! 
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Are you sick of Pokemon Go stories yet?
This one is interesting - what does the mapping interface in the game tell us about the future of mapping in general?
And from the article:
Pokémon Go is preparing us—and more to the point, our kids—for a world in which GPS, driverless cars and location-aware mobile phones transform street names, place names and even maps themselves into quaint artifacts. Technology can now handle the location and navigation work for us; we no longer need to locate ourselves in order to get where we want to go.
Is Pokémon Go is preparing us for a world without cartography?
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I would think of street names and addresses as a kind of landmark though, especially if they have labels on them. And I believe there are two kinds of people, those who see the big picture and can use symbolic representations like maps, and those who find that impossible and rely on the strip-map style of navigation, go two hundred metres and turn left style of thing.
My mother in law is in the second category and finds GPS instructions essential. I never use them at all.
Bottom line, then, I think we need both approaches in combination to cater for different people's ways of perceiving the world.
Even a map user uses landmarks as well, I would think, as a technique for tethering the symbolic representation to the real world.
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Squeeee!
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That looks promising! 
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I used to do a lot of hiking - I haven't for a while. Motherhood... it takes up a lot of time, and even more brain space.
We haven't done a lot of hiking with the kids because, for the most part, the whining kills me. But articles like this one make me reconsider.
Sometimes when you hike a mountain with your child, you learn more than you bargained for.
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That is a lot of steps :)
I took the wriggler hiking on Sunday (inspired by this story)  and we did a 10km round trip, including up a fairly steep hill.  We all survived with a minimum of whining.  And I'd done about 22,000 steps by the end of the day.
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Happy Monday, plussers!
This is a great little map, that shows you a bit about how Australian cities are connected by road - but no so much about the scale.
I do wish it had a proper reference somewhere in the article, but it does have a copyright statement, presumably from the creator, Andrew Douglas-Clifford. 
Related posts: - Railroads of Africa in the style of Harry Beck's London Underground map Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Alex “Maps are like campfires – everyone gathers arou...
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Thanks +Jim Cheetham!  I used to share a lot more maps from the interwebs, but now i only do it if I can find out where they came from... which is very difficult a lot of the time.
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Last Pokemon story for a while - did you know there are academic articles about the evolution of Pokemon?
Me either :)
Pokémon scholarship reached its height with the study “A Phylogeny and Evolutionary History of the Pokémon“, by Matan Shelomi, Andrew Richards, Ivana Li, and Yukinari Okido, which was published in the Annals of Improbable Research, vol. 18, no 4, June/July 2012. Here's a bit of detail from that ...
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