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Kimberly Togman
102 followers -
Philadelphia-based executive coach, Founder, Scalable Leader
Philadelphia-based executive coach, Founder, Scalable Leader

102 followers
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Next Step Partners, a firm I work closely with is offering their Career Handbook for Working Professionals for 50% off (digital format only) until June 29th - it is the most comprehensive resource on making a career transition or conducting a job search that is out there and is reflective of the high quality services NSP offers. It has been purchased by Harvard Business School, Stanford Business School and Wharton for their alumni and executive MBA programs. Check it out!
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Rick Maurer is one of my favorite change experts.  In this short video he introduces the concept of the energy bar.  Simple and useful.

The Energy Bar is a terrific tool for gauging the delta between where you are starting and where you want go as well as  for measuring if you've made it at the end.

I can see applications outside of group meetings as well -- Any time, we are preparing for an encounter for which we'd like a particular outcome, gauging the starting point and its distance from goal can be eye opening. Asking questions around the best ways to move the energy more favorably toward the goal can work in any conversation (client, boss, colleague, employee, spouse, child immediately come to mind).

Thanks for sharing.
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Right on point!  The two points that resonated most with me here are 1. Find a cofounder who is willing and able to put in the same level of effort as you are; and 2. don't let the excitement blind you to red flags.

I've seen founders thrown and disillusioned when they are putting their hearts and souls into a business while their cofounder is more stopping by to do some work.  Of course you must take into account people's economic realities: if she needs to keep her day job until you've got some level of funding, figure out if a full partnership is really viable.  It may not be.  And it may take a few months until it is. Go in with eyes wide open. Answer the questions raised below.

And the red flags...just like in dating.  If something bugs you now (or is a niggling doubt), it will only grow.  People are never better behaved than they are at the beginning of a relationship.  N E V E R.  Play the field a little.  Have discussions with the successful co founders you know to see how they make it work. 

As with all big decisions, best to dip your toe in before you dive
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I'm a big fan of Brené Brown. I loved both of her TED talks on vulnerability and shame. This keynote for the May 2013 99U conference (focused on making great ideas happen--derived from Edison's 99% perspiration quote) is about dealing with critics.

The talk is centered around Roosevelt's 1910 "Man in the Arena" speech:

 It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.   

As always, Ms. Brown delivers her message with humor and conviction.  She talks about the three critics we all meet: shame, scarcity and comparison and advises us to believe like she does, "If you're not in the arena, also getting your ass kicked, I'm not interested in your feedback."
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Our to do lists are long, and many of us are in a constant battle to keep our heads above water. Figuring out what is good enough just may be the answer... thanks @zachmarco
Always Make Promises
Always Make Promises
theatlantic.com
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Some truly great tips.....
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I believe I am one of about six people on the planet who did not love Simon Sinek's TEDx talk on why (though I certainly appreciated the concept of starting with "why").

In this TED talk, Sinek provides some compelling thoughts on what makes a leader, and shares some compelling stories to illustrate how they show up. The talk is just shy of 12 min and definitely worth a viewing.
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The old adage "People join companies and leave managers" still rings true...
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