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Kevin Clift
Worked at Hewlett-Packard
Attended University of Southampton
Lived in Cupertino, California, USA
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Kevin Clift

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Puzzling Rectangles

Find the missing length of a rectangle but calculate it only going up to whole numbers not down to fractions. 

Avoid scrolling to the end of the article if you want don't want to see a mechanism and the answer to the simplest example. 
 
This simple puzzle is a hit in Japan. It is more ingenious than it initially looks. Enjoy!
Area Maze is the a-mazing new game from prolific puzzle inventor Naoki Inaba
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Chalkdust Crossnumber
set by Humbug

The winner of £100 and the answers to this crossnumber have just been announced in Chalkdust magazine, but there is nothing to stop you having a bit of fun before you read the solution!

Clues
Across

    1. D4 multiplied by D18. (10)
    5. A multiple of 101. (3)
    7. The difference between 10D and 11D. (10)
    9. A palindromic number containing at least one 0. (5)
    10. Subtract 24A multiplied by 24A backwards from 100000. (5)
    13. Subtract 8D from 35A then multiply by 17A. (5)
    15. Multiply this by 13D to get a perfect number. (2)
    16. The product of two primes. (2)
    17. A triangular number. (2)
    19. A factor of 6D. (3)
    20. 30A more than the largest number which cannot be written as the sum of distinct fourth powers. (7)
    22. The sum of seven consecutive primes. (3)
    23. When written in Roman numerals, this number is an anagram of XILXX. (2)
    24. The largest prime factor of 733626510400. (2)
    25. A square number. (2)
    27. The product of all the digits of 7A. (5)
    28. A multiple of 107. (5)
    30. Unix time at 01:29:41 (am) on 2 January 1970. (5)
    32. When written in a base other than 10, this number is 5331005655. (10)
    35. The smallest number which is one more than triple its reverse. (3)
    36. All but one of the digits of this number are the same. (10)

Down

    1. 700 less than 3D. (3)
    2. The sum of this number’s digits is equal to 16. (5)
    3. A Fibonacci number. (3)
    4. This is the same as another number in the crossnumber. (5)
    5. A square number containing every digit from 0 to 9 exactly once. (10)
    6. This number’s first digit tells you how many 0s are in this number, the second digit how many 1s, the third digit how many 2s, and so on. (10)
    8. The lowest prime larger than 25A. (2)
    10. The largest prime number with 10 digits. (10)
    11. A multiple of 396533. (10)
    12. If you write a 1 at the end of this number then it is three times larger than if you write a 1 at the start. (5)
    13. Multiply this by 15A to get a perfect number. (2)
    14. The factorial of 17D divided by the factorial of 16A. (7)
    17. The answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe and everything. (2)
    18. A multiple of 5. (5)
    21. The number of the D clue which has the answer 91199. (2)
    26. The total number of vertices in all the Platonic Solids (in 3D). (2)
    27. Two more than 29D. (5)
    29. The first and last digits of this number are equal. (5)
    31. A multiple of 24A. (2)
    33. Each digit of this number is a different non-zero square number. (3)
    34. A square number. (3)



More here: http://goo.gl/ePZi8p

Spoiler Alert (solution and winners)!: http://goo.gl/F1CqQZ

Chalkdust: http://goo.gl/8HPJPg

Image: http://goo.gl/FNpJZX
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like it !
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Ant Transport

Longhorn crazy ants (Paratrechina longicornis) got the sobriquet crazy because instead of following straight lines an individual ant dashes around erratically. Somehow, however, these crazy ants are able, collectively, to move a dead insect, in their natural environment (or a cherio in the case of the lab), back to their nest to the benefit of the whole.

It seems, according to new research, that the collective movement of large food items, by longhorn crazy ants, in the direction of the ant nest is not due to some wisdom of the crowd averaging nor the involvement of a persistently pulling lead ant. Instead, the correct movement is influenced by recently unattached ants that had been meandering around erratically as usual but as such were aware of the direction of the nest. These fresh ants attach themselves to the load and give enough pulling impetus for a short while to move the collective and their load accurately in the direction of the nest.

"The group is tuned to be maximally sensitive to the leader ants," said the paper's senior author Dr Ofer Feinerman, a physicist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot.

He said the ants seem to have just the right amount of erratic individualism. About 90% of the time, they will "go with the flow" and pull in the same direction as everybody else; the other 10% of the time they live up to their name.

That means that on the whole, each ant transport team works together and avoids a fruitless tug-of-war. But crucially, their erratic streak leaves a degree of instability - and this allows a single ant with new information to join in and change the direction.

More here (article): http://goo.gl/x7e7zy

Paper (open): http://goo.gl/bh8Gh5

Longhorn crazy ants (Wikip): https://goo.gl/Nmg5OR

Image: Erin Prado / © AntWeb.org / CC-BY-SA-3.0 https://goo.gl/MHDafo
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I thought finding roots only rhymed in British English.
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Stephen Hawking AMA

Here's your chance to at least ask Professor Stephen Hawking anything (AMA) about managing the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI).  You may even get your question answered but it will be over the coming days not necessarily within the same day as normal.

The question part of Stephen Hawking's AMA begins today.  AMA's are always moderated fairly by volunteer scientists but in this case the answers will also be cut and paste from Stephen Hawking's system into Reddit by the mods over the forthcoming days as he sees fit to answer them.

I signed an open letter earlier this year imploring researchers to balance the benefits of AI with the risks. The letter acknowledges that AI might one day help eradicate disease and poverty, but it also puts the onus on scientists at the forefront of this technology to keep the human factor front and center of their innovations. I'm part of a campaign enabled by Nokia and hope you will join the conversation on http://www.wired.com/maketechhuman. Learn more about my foundation here: http://stephenhawkingfoundation.org/. x

More here: https://goo.gl/HxnxOe

Edit: To only read the questions the Professor answered use
Reddit Enhancement Suite: http://goo.gl/wd8y20.

Image: https://goo.gl/ADyW7b
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If you want to leave a message for him you should get a reddit account and post your message here: https://goo.gl/HxnxOe
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Alarm Call

Should you be lucky enough to be woken, as dawn approaches, by the crowing of a cockerel, then you are probably hearing the top-ranking male in the flock's social hierarchy, who has earnt the privilege of the first call of the new day.

The “cock-a-doodle-doo” crowing of roosters, which symbolizes the break of dawn in many cultures, is controlled by the circadian clock. When one rooster announces the break of dawn, others in the vicinity immediately follow. Chickens are highly social animals, and they develop a linear and fixed hierarchy in small groups. We found that when chickens were housed in small groups, the top-ranking rooster determined the timing of predawn crowing. Specifically, the top-ranking rooster always started to crow first, followed by its subordinates, in descending order of social rank. When the top-ranking rooster was physically removed from a group, the second-ranking rooster initiated crowing. The presence of a dominant rooster significantly reduced the number of predawn crows in subordinates. However, the number of crows induced by external stimuli was independent of social rank, confirming that subordinates have the ability to crow. Although the timing of subordinates’ predawn crowing was strongly dependent on that of the top-ranking rooster, free-running periods of body temperature rhythms differed among individuals, and crowing rhythm did not entrain to a crowing sound stimulus. These results indicate that in a group situation, the top-ranking rooster has priority to announce the break of dawn, and that subordinate roosters are patient enough to wait for the top-ranking rooster’s first crow every morning and thus compromise their circadian clock for social reasons.

Paper (open): http://goo.gl/FxSaOK

Image: Rob Farrow https://goo.gl/7GcHAl
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Never really thought about that when we had chickens. 
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Sea Sapphires

The flashy males of the tiny sapphirinid copepod family of crustaceans can twinkle with specific brilliant iridescent colours and then in an instant become invisible again as they dance in a spiral strategically angled to the light source.  They accomplish this magical feat using the structural colour provided by carefully tuned photonic structures rather than pigments.

Some of the most spectacular colors produced by organisms are derived from periodic layered structures on the length scale of the wavelengths of visible light.(1) Such photonic structures consist of regularly alternating layers of two transparent materials with different refractive indices, such that light reflected from the different layers undergoes constructive interference for some wavelengths and destructive interference for others.(1f, 2a-2c) A multilayer stack can act as a spectrally selective reflector when the optical thickness nd (the product of the physical thickness d and the refractive index n) of the layers falls within the wavelength range of visible light, resulting in the observation of distinct colors.(1f, 2c-2f) The most efficient reflector arrangement is the quarter-wave stack, where the optical thickness of both layers is equal to the one-fourth of the wavelength of the reflected light.(2c, 2f, 2g)

One of the most striking examples of such photonic structures are the male sapphirinid copepods, small marine crustaceans that produce a variety of different colors, but only when the incident light is at specific angles to the animal’s dorsal surface. Thus, the copepods “flash” light of a specific color, but as they move they become transparent and suddenly seem to almost completely disappear (a movie showing this behavior is available at http://www.liquidguru.com/octopod-copepod/). The goal of this study is to understand the structural basis for both the variability of the colors and the strong angular dependence of the reflected light.
[...]

More here: http://goo.gl/7O3SZj

Video (48 secs.): https://goo.gl/6LHAVf

Iridescent Blue Fruit post: https://goo.gl/NZjqIl

Image: http://goo.gl/Z875mw
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fantastic
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Afternoon Faun

If you would like to unwind this Sunday afternoon but can't go for a walk in the woods, you could do worse than listen to this piece of music by Debussy: Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune.

Debussy had written a lot of music before he was 30 but nothing to match this ‘prelude’ to Stéphane Mallarmé’s poem L’après-midi d’un faune (‘The Afternoon of a Faun’). In this work Debussy has created an evocative tone-poem which closely depicts the lascivious thoughts of a sleepy faun.

Debussy lived by one rule – ‘mon plaisir’. Individuality and hedonism were all that mattered. In his youth the composer was introduced to contemporary French Poetry, including Mallarmé’s works. He worked in his lifetime to deepen the ability to parallel the work of contemporary poets in his music.

Pierre Boulez hailed this work as signalling the beginning of modern music.

Performed by the Hallé, conducted by Sir Mark Elder.

Listen here (~11 mins.): http://goo.gl/D6duMJ

More here (a dynamic 'best of the Proms' list): http://goo.gl/ryYpCi

This and various other performances should be available online worldwide without restriction but only for one month after their most recent broadcast. They are easiest to play on a computer (with Chrome^ and Flash) although they will work on iOS (with or without the iPlayer app) and once the BBC media player http://goo.gl/oHuhfM is installed, they will work on Android too.

2015 Proms (inc. what's on): http://goo.gl/lO6dlP.info

Proms History: http://goo.gl/qSKExo.info

^PSA: https://goo.gl/Pbtihm.info


Image: https://goo.gl/GzYSF2
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All the clips on that list are hauntingly beautiful. My personal favourite is the Rach 2.
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Marrow

This crop is from a charming and technically challenging picture that was made out of season by snowflake photographer +Alexey Kljatov.

The picture of marrow pollen and stamina reminded me of my great aunt and great uncle who were the sister and brother of a grandmother and grandfather I never met.  They were rural and lived, what appeared to me to be, a bucolic life in the typical St. Mary Mead-style thatched cottage, a part of a vast flint-walled country estate in the beautiful county of Hampshire.  These two had a large vegetable garden where they grew all their own produce and owned half a dozen bee-hives up on the estate.  They made their own food, drink and entertainment and this ran to delicious mead from the honey, which I loved as a young lad, and marrow rum which I never was allowed to try!  For this they grew huge marrows and would select one, top and core it, fill it with brown sugar, hang it up in the garden shed and let it ferment.

Marrow Rum: http://goo.gl/C2bi4B
 (Do your own research, use common sense and only try home fermentation at your own risk.)
 
It is 350 years since Robert Hooke produced his Micrographia and coined the term cell: http://goo.gl/g9rSAU
 (If you are in the UK you can see the original which far surpasses any online resources so far publicly available.)
 
 Original Image: https://goo.gl/EpXwUZ
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Очень интересно! Рецепт брожения внутри кабачка... Это что-то крайне любопытное!
Я живу в пригороде, раньше это было село. И у нас тоже было обширное хозяйство.
Я люблю своё место. У меня растут кабачки, тыквы, патиссоны. И меня заинтересовало, можно ли сделать брожение в тыкве. Нужно это обсудить с семьёй. :-) 
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Online Alice

To celebrate 150 years of Alice, here is a new online edition of Alice in Wonderland with scholarly annotations and newly commissioned art and (in my opinion garish) GIFs provided in conjunction with the Medium platform by +The Public Domain Review.

Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, “and what is the use of a book,” thought Alice “without pictures or conversation?”

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

More here (chapter one): https://goo.gl/92AlWD

Alice Project Main Page: https://goo.gl/AxApt4

Alice Virtually: https://goo.gl/x89Kk1

Alice Science: https://goo.gl/Wizf93

Image: https://goo.gl/nbrzcG
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Bletchley Girls

By the end of WWII roughly three quarters of the 8,000 people who worked for the secret government communications center, Bletchley Park, were women. They fulfilled various roles from cryptographic and linguistic, through computer operation and clerical.  In fact, over the course of the war, some 7,000 women were hand-picked to work at the codebreaking facility and its outposts around the world. Only a handful, now in their 80s and 90s, survive today.  Historian, broadcaster and writer, Tessa Dunlop, has been taking an aural history from them and writing their stories.

Joanna Chorley had ambitions of going to university after excelling at school in Beaconsfield, where she’d been evacuated from her home in Brighton.

Her father had other ideas. On his return from Canada, where he’d been serving in the air force, he made it plain to the school headteacher that further education was not for his daughter and that it was "an absolute waste of money educating a woman".

Joanna was duly packed off to domestic science college, spending a year completing a housewife’s course that "nearly killed" her.

To avoid any more of her father’s brainwaves, she joined the Wrens at the age of 17, opting to work on "light electrical machinery in the country".

"I always liked nuts and bolts," she explains.

She became one of the "nursemaids" for Colossus – the world’s first electronic programmable computer that was developed for British codebreakers. More than 70 years on, Joanna describes it as "the most amazing thing".

More here (brief article): http://goo.gl/Y1Kfnn

or here (longer article): http://goo.gl/LnhjSZ

The Bletchley Girls by Tessa Dunlop (library book): http://goo.gl/cCQMb4

For decades it was Britain's best kept secret, the huge codebreaking operation centred around a Victorian mansion in Buckinghamshire, Bletchley Park. Despite the fact that at least 8000 people worked at Bletchley, and many others in listening and codebreaking centres across the country, no-one gave the secret away. And when the story did eventually begin to emerge, the star-studded heroes of Bletchley's narrative were men, led by the most famous cryptanalyst of them all, Alan Turing. In recent years, Hollywood blockbusters have cemented the reputation of those clever boffins, who have been credited with shortening the Second World War by many months.

However, if you walked through the gates of Bletchley seventy years ago, you would have been struck not by the number of men working there but the number of young women. That's because by 1944 three quarters of Bletchley's workforce was made up of very young women, or girls, often just out of school.

Tessa Dunlop speaks to some of those Bletchley girls, now in their late 80s and 90s, about their stories. Who were they and what did they do? Why were they selected to work in Britain's most secret organisation and what impact did Bletchley have on the rest of their lives?

Listen here (~28 mins): http://goo.gl/HXFxWz

This programme should be available online worldwide without restriction but only for one month after the most recent broadcast. It is easiest to play on a computer (with Chrome^ and Flash) although it will work on iOS (with or without the iPlayer app) and once the BBC media player http://goo.gl/oHuhfM is installed, it will work on Android too.

^PSA: https://goo.gl/Pbtihm.info

Image: https://goo.gl/Y6QDUl
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Ah, well, that would do it :) As TV goes it was quite good. This sounds even better, though, being the actual women's experiences.
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Terence Tao

Here's another article about the life and times of brilliant G+ participant Terence Tao.

[...]
Possibly the greatest mathematician since antiquity was Carl Friedrich Gauss, a dour German born in the late 18th century. He did not get along with his own children and kept important results to himself, seeing them as unsuitable for public view. They were discovered among his papers after his death. Before and since, the annals of the field have teemed with variations on this misfit theme, from Isaac Newton, the loner with a savage temper; to John Nash, the ‘‘beautiful mind’’ whose work shaped economics and even political science, but who was racked by paranoid delusions; to, more recently, ­Grigory Perelman, the Russian who conquered the Poincaré conjecture alone, then refused the Fields Medal, and who also allowed his fingernails to grow until they curled.

Tao, by contrast, is, as one colleague put it, ‘‘super-normal.’’ He has a gentle, self-­deprecating manner. He eschews job offers from prestigious East Coast institutions in favor of a relaxed, no-drama department in a place where he can enjoy the weather. In class, he conveys a sense that mathematics is fun. One of his students told me that he had recently joked with another about the many ways Tao defies all the Hollywood mad-­genius tropes. ‘‘They will never make a movie about him,’’ he said. ‘‘He doesn’t have a troubled life. He has a family, and they seem happy, and he’s usually smiling.’’

This can be traced to his own childhood, which he experienced as super-normal, even if, to outside eyes, it was anything but. Tao’s family spent most of his early years living in the foothills south of Adelaide, in a brick split-­level with views of Gulf St. Vincent. The home was designed by his father, Billy, a pediatrician who immigrated with Tao’s mother, Grace, from Hong Kong in 1972, three years before Tao, the eldest of three, was born in 1975. The three boys — Nigel, Trevor and ‘‘Terry,’’ as everyone calls him — often played together, and a favorite pastime was inventing board games. They typically appropriated a Scrabble board for a basic grid, then brought in Scrabble tiles, chess pieces, Chinese checkers, mah-jongg tiles and Dungeons & Dragons dice, according to Nigel, who now works for Google. For story lines, they frequently drew from video games coming out at the time, like Super Mario Bros., then added layers of complex, whimsical rules. (Trevor, a junior chess champion, was too good to beat, so the boys created a variation on that game as well: Each turn began with a die roll to determine which piece could be moved.) Tao was a voracious consumer of fantasy books like Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series. When a class was boring, he doodled intricate maps of imaginary lands.
[...]

More here (article): http://goo.gl/5qAZPd

Navier-Stokes (Wikip): https://goo.gl/Z1PwKa

Earlier article (Sydney Morning Herald): https://goo.gl/gDH1l3

Image: https://goo.gl/iA3RjW
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That could be it +Boris Borcic (-:!
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Digital Creativity

Award-winning author and games writer, Naomi Alderman, wants to have a go at programming in today's digital world.  On the way she explores what coding used to be like.  She learns about programming the Dekatron valve-based computer that was used by Mathematicians and Physicists at Harwell, the UK Atomic Energy research establishment.  She hears from Mary Coombs who programmed the world's first computer used for commerce; the famous Leo I (Lyons Electronic Office I) which ran its first business app for the forward-thinking Lyons Tea Rooms in 1951. She finds in those days that the instructions were simple, few and primitive and coded with short numbers perforated into a long but narrow paper tape. Incidentally, in 1954 the LEO II became the world's first commercially available computer.

The rise of higher level programming languages is explored. These replace the need for programming so close to the machine instructions by having compilers or interpreters that convert English language like instructions into the lower level codes automatically behind the scenes. Naomi writes a couple of very simple programs in BASIC and finds the joy of creativity resides there too. Then a more recent language I hadn't encountered before is described.  Inform 7 is a special language for programming interactive fiction and can infer many aspects of a computer game from the higher level descriptions that are provided by the programmer.

In an increasingly digital world, it's easy to feel overwhelmed. Many of us conclude that we just don't have the right brain for this kind of thing. Author Naomi Alderman discovers her latent ability to contribute to our digital future. In the early days of computers, only ultra-logical reductionist thinkers could participate. Amateurs were easily frustrated by computers that seemed to lack common sense. 40 years on, it's a very different story. You don't have to think in 1s and 0s to be a digital creative. Naomi already writes storylines for computer games but she has left the coding to others. Now she finds out if she could do it. She meets the coding experts who think that we've all got something to offer to the digital world.

Listen here: (30 mins) http://goo.gl/16uWvr

Harwell DeKatron (24 secs.): https://goo.gl/ScYCBh

Mary Coombs (3:36): http://goo.gl/lCgr3o

LEO (article): http://goo.gl/3lpsDi

Inform 7 (Interactive fiction programming): http://goo.gl/CwXJT8

Zombies, Run!: https://goo.gl/xyZOhV

Naomi Alderman: http://goo.gl/Mlc8qu

This programme should be available online worldwide without restriction but only for one month after the most recent broadcast. It is easiest to play on a computer (with Chrome^ and Flash) although it will work on iOS (with or without the iPlayer app) and once the BBC media player http://goo.gl/oHuhfM is installed, it will work on Android too.

^PSA: https://goo.gl/Pbtihm.info

Image:  Dekatron by Dieter Waechter https://goo.gl/F0QRwy
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+Kevin Clift I wouldn't have known that if you hit me over the head with the information. That's why you are in my circles. So I can learn things. Remembering them however is a different story.
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Kevin's Collections
People
Have him in circles
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Education
  • University of Southampton
    B.Sc. Mathematics, 1973 - 1976
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Work
Occupation
Family medical responsibilities
Employment
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Director World Wide Pre-Sales (Manufacturing), 2003 - 2005
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Chief Architect (Manufacturing Industries Business Unit), 2002 - 2003
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Solution Creation Manager (Manufacturing), 1999 - 2002
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Prinicipal Consultant, 1997 - 1999
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Manufacturing Business Consultant, 1995 - 1997
  • Hewlett-Packard
    US FMCG Center of Expertise, 1990 - 1995
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Europe FMCG Centre of Expertise, 1988 - 1990
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Applications Engineer (Manufacturing), 1981 - 1988
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Systems Engineer, 1979 - 1981
  • Matchbox
    Production Control Analyst, 1976 - 1979
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Cupertino, California, USA - Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, USA - Reading, England - London, England - Southampton, England - Nürnberg, Germany - Basingstoke, England
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