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Totally Unbealievable!



Cat communication is the transfer of information by one or more cats that has an effect on the current or future behaviour of another animal, including humans. Cats use a range of communication modalities including visual, auditory, tactile, chemical and gustatory.

The communication modalities used by domestic cats have been affected by domestication.


Vocalizations

Cat vocalisations have been categorised according to a range of characteristics.

Schötz categorised vocalizations according to 3 mouth actions: (1) sounds produced with the mouth closed (murmurs), including the purr, the trill and the chirrup, (2) sounds produced with the mouth open and gradually closing, comprising a large variety of miaows with similar vowel patterns, and (3) sounds produced with the mouth held tensely open in the same position, often uttered in aggressive situations (growls, yowls, snarls, hisses, spits and shrieks).

Brown et al. categorised vocal responses of cats according to the behavioural context: (1) during separation of kittens from mother cats, (2) during food deprivation, (3) during pain, (4) prior to or during threat or attack behavior, as in disputes over territory or food, (5) during a painful or acutely stressful experience, as in routine prophylactic injections and (6) during kitten deprivation. Less commonly recorded calls from mature cats included purring, conspecific greeting calls or murmurs, extended vocal dialogues between cats in separate cages, “frustration” calls during training or extinction of conditioned responses.

Miller classified vocalisations into 5 categories according to the sound produced: the purr, chirr, call, meow and growl/snarl/hiss.


Purr

The purr is a continuous, soft, vibrating sound made in the throat by most species of felines. Domestic cat kittens can purr as early as two days of age. This tonal rumbling can characterize different personalities in domestic cats. Purring is often believed to indicate a positive emotional state, but cats sometimes purr when they are ill, tense, or experiencing traumatic or painful moments.

The mechanism of how cats purr is elusive. This is partly because cats do not have a unique anatomical feature that is clearly responsible for the vocalization. One hypothesis, supported by electromyographic studies, is that cats produce the purring noise by using the vocal folds and/or the muscles of the larynx to alternately dilate and constrict the glottis rapidly, causing air vibrations during inhalation and exhalation. Combined with the steady inhalation and exhalation as the cat breathes, a purring noise is produced with strong harmonics. Purring is sometimes accompanied by other sounds, though this varies between individuals. Some may only purr, while other cats include low level outbursts sometimes described as "lurps" or "yowps".

Domestic cats purr at varying frequencies. One study reported that domestic cats purr at average frequencies of 21.98 Hz in the egressive phase and 23.24 Hz in the ingressive phase with an overall mean of 22.6 Hz. Further research on purring in four domestic cats found that the fundamental frequency varied between 20.94 and 27.21 Hz for the egressive phase and between 23.0 and 26.09 Hz for the ingressive phase. There was considerable variation between the four cats in the relative amplitude, duration and frequency between egressive and ingressive phases, although this variation generally occurred within the normal range.

One study on a single cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) showed it purred with an average frequency of 20.87 Hz (egressive phases) and 18.32 Hz (ingressive phases). A further study on four adult cheetahs found that mean frequencies were between 19.3 Hz and 20.5 Hz in ingressive phases, and between 21.9 Hz and 23.4 Hz in egressive phases. The egressive phases were longer than ingressive phases and moreover, the amplitude was greater in the egressive phases.

It was once believed that only the cats of the genus Felis could purr. However, felids of the genus Panthera (tigers, lions, jaguars and leopards) also produce sounds similar to purring, but only when exhaling. The subdivision of the Felidae into ‘purring cats’ on the one hand and ‘roaring cats ’ (i.e. non-purring) on the other, originally goes back to Owen (1834/1835) and was definitely introduced by Pocock (1916), based on a difference in hyoid anatomy. The ‘roaring cats’ (lion, Panthera leo; tiger, P. tigris; jaguar, P. onca; leopard, P. pardus) have an incompletely ossified hyoid, which according to this theory, enables them to roar but not to purr. On the other hand, the snow leopard (Uncia uncia), as the fifth felid species with an incompletely ossified hyoid, purrs (Hemmer, 1972). All remaining species of the family Felidae (‘purring cats’) have a completely ossified hyoid which enables them to purr but not to roar. However, Weissengruber et al. (2002) argued that the ability of a cat species to purr is not affected by the anatomy of its hyoid, i.e. whether it is fully ossified or has a ligamentous epihyoid, and that, based on a technical acoustic definition of roaring, the presence of this vocalization type depends on specific characteristics of the vocal folds and an elongated vocal tract, the latter rendered possible by an incompletely ossified hyoid.





Meow

The meow is one of the most widely known vocalizations of domestic kittens. It is a call apparently used to solicit attention from the mother.

Adult cats commonly vocalise with a "meow" (or "miaow") sound, which is onomatopoeic. The meow can be assertive, plaintive, friendly, bold, welcoming, attention soliciting, demanding, or complaining. It can even be silent, where the cat opens its mouth but does not vocalize. Adult cats do not usually meow to each other and so meowing to human beings is likely to be an extension of the use by kittens.








Language differences

Different languages have correspondingly different words for the "meow" sound, including miau (Belarusian, Croatian, Hungarian, Dutch, Finnish, Lithuanian, Malay, German, Polish, Russian, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish and Ukrainian), mnau (Czech), meong (Indonesian), niau (Ukrainian), niaou (?????, Greek), miaou (French), nya (??, Japanese), miao (?, Mandarin Chinese, Italian), miav/miao or mjav/mjau (Danish, Swedish and Norwegian), mjá (Icelandic), ya-ong (??, Korean), ????? / Miya?un_ (Urdu) and meo-meo (Vietnamese). In some languages (such as Chinese ?, mao), the vocalization became the name of the animal itself.

Read more : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_communication

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Cutest Kitties



Cats love boxes. Big cats, small cats, big boxes, small boxes…doesn’t seem to matter to the cats. A box is a box, and a box = GOOD TIMES! So what’s the big feline attraction?

Boxes also offer safe, cozy places for felines to nap. Cats sleep 18 to 20 hours a day, so it makes sense they’d seek out places where they’d be safe from attack.
 
Place a blanket in a box that's about the right size for your cat and it will likely become one of his favorite places to nap. The confined space provides a sense of safety, and the sides of the box help maintain the animal’s body heat.
 
But while all cats instinctively appreciate a good box, no feline seems to enjoy cardboard quite as much as Maru, the Internet-famous cat with more than 400,000 YouTube subscribers.
 
In a 2010 interview with cat blog LoveMeow, Maru (as told to the blogger behind the website) said, "I don’t know why, but I can't seem to stop going into a box when I see one. When I nap, I like a small box because it is snug and fits me just right. However, when I play, I prefer a huge one."

Most cats also enjoy other similar enclosed, box-like objects such as drawers, laundry baskets, sinks and paper bags.  What’s the attraction? While no one can say with certainty what goes on inside the feline mind, there are some theories:

They like the security of an enclosed space. A box resembles a cave and may make your cat feel secure knowing they are protected and, theoretically, cannot be attacked from behind.

Boxes are fun! Lots of cats seem especially playful in and around boxes. Cats enjoy jumping in and out of a box, pouncing, stalking and climbing atop boxes. Cats are little predators, and a box is a great spot from which to pounce on their prey, even if the prey is just a catnip mouse toy.

Boxes are cozy. Try putting a soft blanket in the bottom of your cat’s favorite box. The sides help retain the cat’s body heat making a comfy nest.

It’s instinctive.  When was the last time you saw your cat sleeping in the middle of a wide-open space? Cats seem to instinctively prefer smaller, more confined spaces.

Luckily, it is inexpensive to provide a box or two for your cat to enjoy. Try throwing a cat toy or two inside the box for added fun. Just make sure the box is in a safe place and that your cat can easily get in and out of the box with no risk of becoming trapped inside.


Read More: http://www.thepetcollective.tv/why-do-cats-love-boxes

Read more: http://www.mnn.com/family/pets/stories/why-do-cats-love-boxes-so-much

Read More: http://www.petmeds.org/petmeds-spotlight/why-do-cats-love-boxes-so-much-anyway

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What is it about boxes that sends our feline friends into a frenzy?

Cats love boxes: big boxes, small boxes, even items that resemble boxes, such as drawers, sinks and laundry baskets. Cats enjoy the comfort and security of a small confined space, it’s like a little den or cave to them. Cats often like to curl up in a small confined space to sleep, and why not? Cats sleep 18 – 20 hours a day, so it makes sense that if you’re going to spend that much time sleeping, you should do it in a place where you are safe from attack. A box is a security blanket for a cat, and can relieve stress and anxiety.

It’s part of a cat’s instinct to be attracted to boxes. Boxes are a great place to hide from predators, but they are also a fantastic place for spying on the world around them. From inside a box, a cat can remain invisible to the world, while stalking prey…like tiny, little, furry secret agents.

Boxes are easy to get a hold of, are inexpensive, and often times totally free. If you order products online, or get a gift, you may notice your cat coming around to inspect the box. If you want your cat to enjoy a box, try putting a blanket inside, and their favorite toy or some cat nip. Never put your cat in a box as punishment. A box should always be a warm, comforting, happy place for your cat.

Boxes aren't just fun and games for your kitty. Those 4 cardboard walls offer safety and security — in addition to being a great place to swat at passersby.
 
Cats are instinctively drawn to boxes because they offer security. The confined space provides protection from predators, and it’s a great place to stalk prey while remaining virtually unseen.
 
Climbing onto, jumping into and hiding in boxes is simply part of a cat's natural behavior, so providing an empty box or two is an inexpensive way to enrich your pet’s environment.
 
Leave a box in a safe place for your cat to play. You can drop in a couple of favorite toys or cut a few holes in the side so he can peek through or stick out a paw to swat at toys — or people.

Even big cats like boxes!





Read More: http://www.thepetcollective.tv/why-do-cats-love-boxes

Read more: http://www.mnn.com/family/pets/stories/why-do-cats-love-boxes-so-much

Read More: http://www.petmeds.org/petmeds-spotlight/why-do-cats-love-boxes-so-much-anyway

#CuteCat #Cats #Animals #HappyCaturday #Kitten #LOLCats #Anime #CaturdayEveryday #Cat #Caturday2014 #Cute #Funny #Gif #CatLovers #LOL #FunnyCats #FunnyPics #Kitten #Caturday2014 #CatsAllOverTheWorld #OneCatADayKeepsTheDoctorAway #Kitty #Caturday #CutenessOverload #Meme #CaturdayEveryday #CatLovers #CatsRule #lolz #laugh
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+Naina Chhabra Yes..they are precious. I have a passion for kittens. Years ago, I used to offer pregnant females into my home, they would have their kittens and I was very lucky to find good homes for the babies and eventually their mom's. It seems I have always had a cat. My new husband is allergic to them, so now we have a cute little doggie :) 
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Amazing costume in Venice! (A few minutes before, we caught her taking a smoking break by St. Marks. Now that was a sight!)

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Karneval in Venedig!
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Kent Gustavson

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Beautiful Italy!
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muy bello!
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Kent Gustavson

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Reminds me of nightmares.
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Go on, have some water! I will show you how to drink!



Why Do Cats Like Small Places?

Cats like to squeeze themselves into small spaces. They crawl into drawers, baskets, and boxes. They climb into corners of closets, hide under beds, and station themselves in the corner of your favorite easy chair. Before you've even unpacked your groceries, your cat is curled up inside one of the paper bags.

If it is small in area and has at least three sides, your cat will probably climb inside and make himself comfortable.

It isn't difficult to imagine why cats like being enclosed. They feel snug and protected in smaller, defined places. Cats have a natural need for warmth and protection; their ever-present instinct tells them to be alert to dangers that might sneak up on them when they are dozing. If the enclosure has a top, that's even better.

You should make sure your pet has a variety of snug places where he can curl up and take a nap. Pet stores and pet supply catalogs carry an endless variety of beds, boxes and hideaways from which to choose. But a simple homemade Shangri-La can be made from a cardboard box tipped on its side and lined with a soft pillow or blanket. An upside-down box with holes cut in the sides also will make a nice retreat. Or just open a drawer once in a while and see if your kitty takes up residence. Paper bags (but not plastic ones) also make great hideaways.

Some cats like their cat carriers, too, especially if they've had plenty of opportunity to explore them. Place the carrier in a room where your kitty likes to hang out and remove the door, or prop it open. Put treats or favorite toys inside, and let him discover them on his own. If the carrier is furnished with his favorite blanket, the familiar scent will help him to accept it, and you may find him nestled in there when he's ready for a nap. Then when it's time for a visit to the veterinarian, it won't be so scary because he'll be in his "home away from home."

Read More: http://www.petplace.com/cats/why-do-cats-like-small-places/page1.aspx

#caturday #cat #catlovers #catsrule #catsallovertheworld #catsofgoogle #catsofinstagram #catsofgoogleplus #catsoftheday #catsongoogleplus #catsonyoutube #catsongoogle #caturdayeveryday #caturday2014 #catitude #catlove #catloversworld #catslogic #catloversnetwork #gif #lol #lolz #lolcats   
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Mother cat teching here baby cAt
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There's a mouse! OMG! I SAW A MOUSE! OMG!





Cat communication is the transfer of information by one or more cats that has an effect on the current or future behaviour of another animal, including humans. Cats use a range of communication modalities including visual, auditory, tactile, chemical and gustatory.

The communication modalities used by domestic cats have been affected by domestication.


Vocalizations

Cat vocalisations have been categorised according to a range of characteristics.

Schötz categorised vocalizations according to 3 mouth actions: (1) sounds produced with the mouth closed (murmurs), including the purr, the trill and the chirrup, (2) sounds produced with the mouth open and gradually closing, comprising a large variety of miaows with similar vowel patterns, and (3) sounds produced with the mouth held tensely open in the same position, often uttered in aggressive situations (growls, yowls, snarls, hisses, spits and shrieks).

Brown et al. categorised vocal responses of cats according to the behavioural context: (1) during separation of kittens from mother cats, (2) during food deprivation, (3) during pain, (4) prior to or during threat or attack behavior, as in disputes over territory or food, (5) during a painful or acutely stressful experience, as in routine prophylactic injections and (6) during kitten deprivation. Less commonly recorded calls from mature cats included purring, conspecific greeting calls or murmurs, extended vocal dialogues between cats in separate cages, “frustration” calls during training or extinction of conditioned responses.

Miller classified vocalisations into 5 categories according to the sound produced: the purr, chirr, call, meow and growl/snarl/hiss.


Purr

The purr is a continuous, soft, vibrating sound made in the throat by most species of felines. Domestic cat kittens can purr as early as two days of age. This tonal rumbling can characterize different personalities in domestic cats. Purring is often believed to indicate a positive emotional state, but cats sometimes purr when they are ill, tense, or experiencing traumatic or painful moments.

The mechanism of how cats purr is elusive. This is partly because cats do not have a unique anatomical feature that is clearly responsible for the vocalization. One hypothesis, supported by electromyographic studies, is that cats produce the purring noise by using the vocal folds and/or the muscles of the larynx to alternately dilate and constrict the glottis rapidly, causing air vibrations during inhalation and exhalation. Combined with the steady inhalation and exhalation as the cat breathes, a purring noise is produced with strong harmonics. Purring is sometimes accompanied by other sounds, though this varies between individuals. Some may only purr, while other cats include low level outbursts sometimes described as "lurps" or "yowps".

Domestic cats purr at varying frequencies. One study reported that domestic cats purr at average frequencies of 21.98 Hz in the egressive phase and 23.24 Hz in the ingressive phase with an overall mean of 22.6 Hz. Further research on purring in four domestic cats found that the fundamental frequency varied between 20.94 and 27.21 Hz for the egressive phase and between 23.0 and 26.09 Hz for the ingressive phase. There was considerable variation between the four cats in the relative amplitude, duration and frequency between egressive and ingressive phases, although this variation generally occurred within the normal range.

One study on a single cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) showed it purred with an average frequency of 20.87 Hz (egressive phases) and 18.32 Hz (ingressive phases). A further study on four adult cheetahs found that mean frequencies were between 19.3 Hz and 20.5 Hz in ingressive phases, and between 21.9 Hz and 23.4 Hz in egressive phases. The egressive phases were longer than ingressive phases and moreover, the amplitude was greater in the egressive phases.

It was once believed that only the cats of the genus Felis could purr. However, felids of the genus Panthera (tigers, lions, jaguars and leopards) also produce sounds similar to purring, but only when exhaling. The subdivision of the Felidae into ‘purring cats’ on the one hand and ‘roaring cats ’ (i.e. non-purring) on the other, originally goes back to Owen (1834/1835) and was definitely introduced by Pocock (1916), based on a difference in hyoid anatomy. The ‘roaring cats’ (lion, Panthera leo; tiger, P. tigris; jaguar, P. onca; leopard, P. pardus) have an incompletely ossified hyoid, which according to this theory, enables them to roar but not to purr. On the other hand, the snow leopard (Uncia uncia), as the fifth felid species with an incompletely ossified hyoid, purrs (Hemmer, 1972). All remaining species of the family Felidae (‘purring cats’) have a completely ossified hyoid which enables them to purr but not to roar. However, Weissengruber et al. (2002) argued that the ability of a cat species to purr is not affected by the anatomy of its hyoid, i.e. whether it is fully ossified or has a ligamentous epihyoid, and that, based on a technical acoustic definition of roaring, the presence of this vocalization type depends on specific characteristics of the vocal folds and an elongated vocal tract, the latter rendered possible by an incompletely ossified hyoid.





Meow

The meow is one of the most widely known vocalizations of domestic kittens. It is a call apparently used to solicit attention from the mother.

Adult cats commonly vocalise with a "meow" (or "miaow") sound, which is onomatopoeic. The meow can be assertive, plaintive, friendly, bold, welcoming, attention soliciting, demanding, or complaining. It can even be silent, where the cat opens its mouth but does not vocalize. Adult cats do not usually meow to each other and so meowing to human beings is likely to be an extension of the use by kittens.








Language differences

Different languages have correspondingly different words for the "meow" sound, including miau (Belarusian, Croatian, Hungarian, Dutch, Finnish, Lithuanian, Malay, German, Polish, Russian, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish and Ukrainian), mnau (Czech), meong (Indonesian), niau (Ukrainian), niaou (?????, Greek), miaou (French), nya (??, Japanese), miao (?, Mandarin Chinese, Italian), miav/miao or mjav/mjau (Danish, Swedish and Norwegian), mjá (Icelandic), ya-ong (??, Korean), ????? / Miya?un_ (Urdu) and meo-meo (Vietnamese). In some languages (such as Chinese ?, mao), the vocalization became the name of the animal itself.

Read more : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_communication

#cats #animals #caturday #caturdayeveryday #caturday2014 #catsrule #catsallovertheworld #catholic #catlovers #animallovers #animalphotography #catphotography #catphotos #catpictures #catpics #lol #funny #funnypics #funnypictures #funnyphotos #funnystuff #ANNIMATEDGIFS   #trendingnow   #lolcats
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I'm so confused! Thats what he's saying'
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Why do cats hate birds


Why do cats hate birds?

Cats don't hate birds at all. It is in cats' nature to eat birds. If they were just killing them out of spite you might say they hated birds...but they just kill them to eat.

When a cat kills prey, it bites down quickly several times.  The "chatter" is simulating the cat's behavior at the time of attack.

Alternatively (according to a visitor): it's pure and simple frustration. When a cat is stalking or killing a bird, they're almost invariably completely silent.

It's when they are shut off from the prey that they chatter.  Another reason that cats "chatter" when they see a bird is because they are attempting to imitate a bird call to lure in their prey from out of reach places.

You’re probably very familiar with the sight of your cat sitting at the window and watching the birds outdoors.

Your cat’s tail may begin lashing from side to side and he may even crouch down at the window, almost as if he’s going to spring through the glass and pounce on the unsuspecting bluejay. It’s then that you hear that sound – the little chattering noise that comes from your cat.

It looks and sounds as though your cat is talking to himself, but what is he really doing? Is he talking to the bird? Why do cats chatter when they spot prey?


Different Theories Behind Chattering:

There are a few theories behind the chattering and chirping sound that comes from your kitty.

Some experts believe it may be connected to the frustration he feels from not being able to get to the prey.

It’s also believed that the chattering is merely a reflex motion in anticipation of performing the killing bite to the prey’s neck.

Another theory is that it’s purely how the cat controls his over-the-top excitement at spotting the bird.

So I guess you can take your pick when it comes to the reason your kitty engages in the behavior.

There are some mysteries that cats insist on keeping to themselves and chattering is one of them.


Does Your Cat Chatter?

If your cat sits at the window and chatters while watching the birds, you can take advantage of his excitement by engaging him in an interactive play session.

That way, he’ll actually get to “capture” his prey. Additionally, if the reason behind the chattering is based on frustration, if you conduct a play session it will change the situation from frustrating to fulfilling.


Read More: http://www.catbehaviorassociates.com/why-do-cats-chatter/

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That cat was maad!
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I found the kitty!

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The leaning barn of Renon. (Can you find the kitty?)
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Penso que o gatinho está no telhado por detrás da árvore ....está ?
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Kent Gustavson

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Carnival in Venice - it was a fascinating trip!
 
Karneval in Venedig!
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"I am now face to face with dying. But I am not finished with living." - Oliver Sacks

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/19/opinion/oliver-sacks-on-learning-he-has-terminal-cancer.html

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Dancing Cat




Why Do Cats Like Small Places?

Cats like to squeeze themselves into small spaces. They crawl into drawers, baskets, and boxes. They climb into corners of closets, hide under beds, and station themselves in the corner of your favorite easy chair. Before you've even unpacked your groceries, your cat is curled up inside one of the paper bags.

If it is small in area and has at least three sides, your cat will probably climb inside and make himself comfortable.

It isn't difficult to imagine why cats like being enclosed. They feel snug and protected in smaller, defined places. Cats have a natural need for warmth and protection; their ever-present instinct tells them to be alert to dangers that might sneak up on them when they are dozing. If the enclosure has a top, that's even better.

You should make sure your pet has a variety of snug places where he can curl up and take a nap. Pet stores and pet supply catalogs carry an endless variety of beds, boxes and hideaways from which to choose. But a simple homemade Shangri-La can be made from a cardboard box tipped on its side and lined with a soft pillow or blanket. An upside-down box with holes cut in the sides also will make a nice retreat. Or just open a drawer once in a while and see if your kitty takes up residence. Paper bags (but not plastic ones) also make great hideaways.

Some cats like their cat carriers, too, especially if they've had plenty of opportunity to explore them. Place the carrier in a room where your kitty likes to hang out and remove the door, or prop it open. Put treats or favorite toys inside, and let him discover them on his own. If the carrier is furnished with his favorite blanket, the familiar scent will help him to accept it, and you may find him nestled in there when he's ready for a nap. Then when it's time for a visit to the veterinarian, it won't be so scary because he'll be in his "home away from home."

Read More: http://www.petplace.com/cats/why-do-cats-like-small-places/page1.aspx

#caturday #cat #catlovers #catsrule #catsallovertheworld #catsofgoogle #catsofinstagram #catsofgoogleplus #catsoftheday #catsongoogleplus #catsonyoutube #catsongoogle #caturdayeveryday #caturday2014 #catitude #catlove #catloversworld #catslogic #catloversnetwork #gif #lol #lolz #lolcats  
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look at my but look it shake
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Indie Publisher, Speaker, Author & Musician
Skills
Publishing, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Books, Public Speaking, Music, Teaching, Blogging, Social Media, Higher Education, Innovation, Guitar, Composition, Motivational Speaking, Speech Writing, Writing, Ghostwriting, Editing, Graphic Design, Executive Coaching, Business Coaching, Copywriting, Folklore, American Studies, Folk Music, History, Music Industry, Musicians, Small Business, Start-ups, Interviews, Literature, Social Networking, Proofreading, Web Design, Publicity, Content Development, Ebooks, Non-fiction, Lecturing
Employment
  • Blooming Twig
    Founder & Editor-in-Chief, 2005 - present
    Award-winning indie publisher in Tulsa and New York.
  • Chiaroscuro Partners
    Co-Founder, 2013 - present
    Boutique branding agency in New York.
  • Ninety and Nine Records
    Founder & CEO, 2004 - present
    Boutique record label based in NY & Europe.
  • Gustavson Creative
    CEO, 2013 - present
    High-level consulting work with individuals and corporations. Brand identity, intellectual property development, thought leadership.
  • Walk Out Series LLC
    Founder & President, 2013 - present
    Public speaker training and development. Workshop, book, keynote and intellectual property ideation, production, and dissemination.
  • Stony Brook University
    Faculty Director, 2010 - 2011
    Leadership Development Minor Community Service Learning Minor Living Learning Centers for Leadership and Community Service
  • Stony Brook University
    Adjunct Professor, 2003 - 2011
    Music Department European Languages Department Writing & Rhetoric Department Leadership and Service Program
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
November 24
Other names
Rusty Gustavson
Story
Tagline
Indie publisher, TEDx speaker, musician & award-winning author.
Introduction
Kent Gustavson, PhD is a thought leader in the world of independent publishing. As an award-winning author, owner of an acclaimed indie publishing house, and founder of a successful author mentorship program, he has the rare distinction of having a 360-degree perspective of the indie publishing world. Through the wide scope of his accomplished career he’s developed boldly innovative approaches to indie publishing that yield real results.

Kent is highly regarded for writing the definitive biography of music icon Doc Watson, 'Blind But Now I See'. The book won the Next Generation Indie Book Award and has circulated around 50,000 copies. His publishing company, Blooming Twig, has published more than 300 books—many of which have become bestsellers and garnered major indie awards. With his esteemed mentorship program, 'Walk out with a book', he has codified his successes as an author and a publisher into a method that yields bestselling results for first-time / early-career authors. 

His progressive, and pragmatic, approach to publishing stems from the empowering ethos of the D.I.Y. music scene. Here, artists took business matters into their own hands and created lucrative opportunities away from ivory tower major labels. “Traditional publishers are dying. With more accessible methods to print via the internet, like e-books, the power is given back to individual authors and small, hardworking publishers,” Kent explains. “A whole new era is blossoming; it’s like the French Revolution for books.”

From systematic principles that make that monumental step of starting a book less daunting to revelatory publishing advice, Kent offers guidance for authors every step of the way. "I'm all about conversation, connection, and truth," he says. "It's an amazing new time. It's possible for everyone to find success as an author."

(Bio by Lorne Behrman)
Bragging rights
Have rescued and fostered countless animals.
Education
  • Stony Brook University
    PhD in Composition, 2004 - 2007
  • Stony Brook University
    MA in Composition, 2002 - 2004
  • Middlebury College
    Music & German, 1996 - 2000
  • Erich Fried Gesamtschule Ronsdorf
    1995 - 1996
  • Caddo Magnet High School
    1994 - 1995
  • St. Paul Academy and Summit School
    1992 - 1994
  • Stillwater Junior High School
    1990 - 1992
  • Lily Lake Elementary School
    1989 - 1990
  • Marine Elementary School
    1985 - 1989
  • South Highlands Elementary Magnet School
    1983 - 1985
Contact Information
Work
Phone
1-866-389-1482 x704
Email
Address
320 S. Boston, Suite 1026 Tulsa, OK 74103