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Kenny Strawn
Worked at Green Thumb International
Attends Saddleback College
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Kenny Strawn

Apologetics Events  - 
 
The #reTHINK16 conference, courtesy of +Stand to Reason​​, had an amazing turnout to say the least. Got a bunch of video and slide images on Instagram (@strawn.04, if you're wondering what my username is over there) of the arguments and topics presented.
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Kenny Strawn

Apologetics Content  - 
 
The one end-times trait that radical Islamists lack: narcissism.
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Kenny Strawn

Devices w/ Nougat  - 
 
Pixel and Pixel XL made official
See this Instagram video by @google • 2,023 likes
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Kenny Strawn

Apologetics Content  - 
 
"According to conventional geology, these microbe colonies existed on the heels of a period when Earth was undergoing heavy asteroid bombardment, making it virtually uninhabitable."
A new fossil discovery makes it even tougher for Darwinists to explain the origin of life.
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Kenny Strawn

Apologetics Content  - 
 
A pet peeve of mine that is especially common among unitarianists. The cause is salvation; the effect is an impulse to do good works — reversing the cause and effect is a logical fallacy to say the least.
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Jimmy Coates's profile photoPaul Srch's profile photoMyContext's profile photoKenny Strawn's profile photo
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Christian "good works" and non-Christian "good works" differ on one fundamental point: integrity. Sure, there are nonbelievers who do great things within the context of their professions, but what happens when they get home? They probably start having a myriad of lustful, prideful, greedy, or other thoughts going through their minds. Christians who actually put their faith above everything else — those who put their careers or their public image before God are breaking the first of the Ten Commandments and therefore are not the Christians they claim to be — not only do good things but also have good thoughts, taking the time at home not to think of people lustfully, complain about others' possessions, or praise their own reflections in the mirror, but rather to think about how to bust those who do those things.

Kenny Strawn

Apologetics Content  - 
 
Side by side: Daniel 10 vs. Revelation 1. This is something Frank Turek failed to mention in his Daniel series.
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Kenny Strawn

▶ Google Play Store  - 
 
I know that there are a bunch of people who have a huge problem with bugs, and that may be a valid reason for the exceptionally slow rollout for non-touch Chromebooks, but for those of us who don't care: Why is there no "ARC++ Beta Program"?
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Yanny Mishchuk's profile photoScott Collier's profile photoKenny Strawn's profile photo
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+HP​
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Kenny Strawn

Apologetics Content  - 
 
Harping on that sentence while simultaneously ignoring the rest of the paragraph that it was originally part of is one of the most fallacious of all logical fallacies: quote mining.
 
+Kenny Strawn I can only suggest that one focus on the actual interlinkages that are being claimed as opposed to demonization of people.

https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/116954640070237895528/+KennyStrawn/posts/Hbf3JPAz5iG

[Christian "good works" and non-Christian "good works" differ on one fundamental point: integrity.]

This US versus THEM mentality tends to blind all groups to the reality that there are rotten people in all groups. Here's an example of the problem with that I idea.

Psychology of Homophobia
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1a_ier3Cjs

[Sure, there are nonbelievers who do great things within the context of their professions, but what happens when they get home?]

Here's a video entertaining that notion here:

Secret Lives of Atheists
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbfFAYn8bgc

I can only ask you to think about YOUR statement rewritten as follows:

Sure, there are nonbelievers believers who do great things within the context of their professions, but what happens when they get home?

I am sure one could imagine someone being a complete A** with regard to their family. Cheating, lying, abusing, and whatever when they get home, but present like they are angels when they are not at home.

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Here's what seems to be at least some of the real issues behind various points of divide on many issues:

Moral Roots of Liberals and Conservatives
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SOQduoLgRw
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MyContext's profile photoKenny Strawn's profile photo
20 comments
 
+MyContext​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

"No, it is a point of observation which is then used for other claims (at least until there is grounds to reject the observation as categorical, which depending on what is understood may entail the idea being scaled down.)"

So is the evidence that the universe had a beginning and therefore had a cause a "point of observation". Are you of the Krauss type, who puts blind faith in theories like the multiverse that one must travel outside the universe (read: physically impossible) to prove absolutely, or are you of the type that goes to the flat earth level and denies that the universe had a beginning altogether as the 19th century atheists did?

"Various depictions of the Bible versus reality as currently understood such as:

1. Genesis account"

When you annihilate a particle and antiparticle, what do you get? A recreation of Genesis 1:3. If matter can be converted into energy, then so too can energy be converted into matter, and that's exactly what this verse alleges.

The account then shifts to the early Earth, which was, shortly after the water precipitated put of the thick, Venus-like atmosphere, a water world until the first continents formed, just as the claim in Genesis 1:9 echoes.

Furthermore, what life was first to exist? Photosynthetic life according to scientists, and that's exactly what Genesis 1:11 claims. Keep in mind, even after the oceans were created and the atmosphere thinned out considerably, it still was almost pure CO2 at this point. CO2 is a greenhouse gas, which means more ocean evaporation, and, ergo, more high cloud cover — enough to make the entire planet's sky overcast until after some CO2 got replaced with oxygen, at which point the sun and moon would be within clear view of Earth for the first time, which Genesis 1:14-19 can be construed as an implicit reference to (just because the Sun and Moon existed before this point does not mean that they were visible from the ground before this point).

Finally, after all this, we have the Cambrian "explosion" which contained mostly marine life, and then, after the Paleozoic, a myriad of all sorts of feathered beasts, including dinosaurs which most scientists agree now have feathers. Both of these incidents are collectively referred to in Genesis 1:20, and in the correct order. After this, mammals (Genesis 1:24) and humans (Genesis 1:26) are also placed in their correct ordinal positions.

On top of all this, we also have the Hebrew word "yom" which can mean anything from a day to a week to a month to a year to a "seven" to a period with an undetermined length. Once the ordinal positions are deemed correct, then correcting the relatively short period is only a matter of retranslating "yom" using that last definition (unspecified period of time).

Keep in mind, the Genesis account was allegedly given to Moses as a series of visions from God without interpretations. If there's a vision without an interpretation, then Moses must come up with the interpretation for that vision, and when that happens, then the end result is a corruption of what was supposed to be a series of geologically accurate dreams by Moses' predetermined cosmology.

"2. Living inside an animal
3. Virgin Births
4. Numerous other claims that are falsehoods within the context of what is currently known."

If all miracles are "falsehoods within the context of what is currently known" as you claim, then the Big Bang theory is also a "falsehood within the context of what is currently known", why? Because of how extremely precise all constants in this universe are — a minute upon minute upon minute change in any constants within this universe would seal our doom. Accidents don't do this. Accidents create chaos, not order, yet throughout the very fabric of our universe, throughout its underpinnings, what we see is evidence of order, not chaos.

"Various depictions of books in the Bible versus various other books in the Bible.

There was a point when the god notion of the Hebrews was localized to a place. This was later changed to be everywhere. The OT doesn't contain the idea of hell or Satan, but this idea is created in the NT."

One word: Daniel. The ideas of hell and of the "man of lawlessness" (the devil, the Antichrist) were created in Daniel 10, not in the NT as you claim. If Daniel were in fact written in the 160's BC as some with a predetermined notion of prophecy being impossible claim, moreover, then explain the Daniel 9 prophecy (attached image) which points directly to the 30's AD. There are definitely older Daniel manuscripts than that period in existence, that's for sure, so at this point we're talking flat earth level manuscript denialism on the part of those who claim that Daniel belongs in the NT simply because it references NT events.

Daniel also was written (allegedly) in Babylon, which debunks your "localized to a place" claim.
https://plus.google.com/photos/112691293278538254479/albums/6328153524395235473/6328153523626886898

Kenny Strawn

Discussion  - 
 
 
With ARC++ set to be delivered to a myriad of Chromebooks, the case for Android Studio on Chrome OS — where it would be especially easy to develop Android apps because of the fact that ARC++ is a viable replacement for an emulator — is now stronger than ever. Why, therefore, is there still an overall lack of plans by Google in this regard?

An NaCl port of the SDK tools and Gradle, which serve as the Android Studio backbone if you will, is really all that would be needed — the entire UI of Android Studio is written in Java, so once we have a working "java.nexe", everything else would be just run-and-go.
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Kenny Strawn

General Discussion  - 
 
With ARC++ set to be delivered to a myriad of Chromebooks, the case for Android Studio on Chrome OS — where it would be especially easy to develop Android apps because of the fact that ARC++ is a viable replacement for an emulator — is now stronger than ever. Why, therefore, is there still an overall lack of plans by Google in this regard?

An NaCl port of the SDK tools and Gradle, which serve as the Android Studio backbone if you will, is really all that would be needed — the entire UI of Android Studio is written in Java, so once we have a working "java.nexe", everything else would be just run-and-go.
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This is probably a better question for the Android Developer Tools community [1] or the Android Studio community [2]. Although as a general rule, Google doesn't talk about future plans.

[1] - https://plus.google.com/communities/114791428968349268860
[2] - https://plus.google.com/communities/103491657963571270604
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Kenny Strawn

Discussion  - 
 
Now that the Z release is only two releases away… what's next?
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zombie zebra
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+John Ferguson Never once does that paragraph or link mention the fact that the rock layers often contain organic matter (namely, plant matter) which in turn allows for carbon-14 dating. That is where they got these ±10-year error margins from.
Story
Tagline
Saddleback College app developer/Christian apologist in training (est. 1993)... who also LOVES to study effects of ocean (ENSO) on climate
Introduction
Hello, my name is Kenny Strawn, was born on April 14, 1993, live in Mission Viejo, CA, and am currently a student at Saddleback College studying... you guessed it... software development, particularly for smartphones, tablets, and Chromebooks. Have gone through three Chromebooks so far: started with a Cr-48 back in early 2011 that had a loose SATA cable to the SSD, then went on to an Acer AC700-1099 that was very fast and amazing at first, but soon became a severe underperformer, and now I'm rocking an Acer C720-2802 and loving it.

Since I have been so busy splitting time lately between Google+ and other social networks, it's been a long time since I last updated this. And since most of the content in here is ridiculously out of date (in fact, some of it even carried over from (!) Buzz), I figured this entire section deserves a complete rewrite.

I'm obviously kind of a rare mix of political positions here. There's millions of so-called "Christians" in the United States, sure... but what they practice is obviously not what they preach; in fact, the greedy billionaire Republicans in particular are in many ways completely contradicting themselves by being greedy and yet calling themselves Christians at the same time (Matthew 6:24). Likewise, there are others who do many things that are biblically correct on the financial and humility front, yet at the same time are pro-gay, pro-abortion Atheists. I, fortunately, see fault in BOTH of these positions, which is why I ended up voting for Gary Johnson (on his third-party ticket) in the 2012 election, since the choice between Obama and Romney in this case was a choice between a pro-gay, pro-abortion hypocrite and a pro-greed, pro-denialism hypocrite.

Another thing that sets me apart is that I also see that in many ways science and (wait, my pastor cringes at the word) religion are by no means one-against the other, and such relics as the Shroud of Turin (remember Ray Downing's awesome spectacle?) and many references to forensically accurate astronomical phenomena (round Earth, Earth revolves around the Sun... you know, the basic stuff that back in those days scientists frowned upon) in scripture only seem to reinforce what we know about science in general, which, along with how overplayed the evidence for Darwinism really is, is why being a software development student hasn't stopped me from continuing to be a (as anyone else would call me) Jesus-freak at the same time.

Back to the politics bit, since verses like Luke 6:24-26, 1 Timothy 6:10, and Matthew 6:24 all seem to condemn greed, they also condemn (in the modern era) the patent trolling and pervasive license restrictions that software vendors like Apple and Microsoft use to lock down their products and stifle others... but then again, I also know that HTC, Samsung, and LG can in the case of their proprietary forks of Android that they install on non-Nexus devices be just as foul as Apple when it comes to openness (locked bootloaders? Really?), which made me, back in December 2012, settle for an iPhone 4S (which was $99 with the 5 already out) instead of going for another AT&T Android device, since I am much happier with an up-to-date proprietary fork of Darwin (iOS 7) than I ever would be with an out-of-date (by several versions, at least) proprietary fork of Android.

Bragging rights
None. If there's any joy in my life, Jesus is the one who made it happen; therefore, He's the one that deserves the credit (see Ephesians 2:8-9).
Education
  • Saddleback College
    Applications development, 2013 - present
  • El Toro High School
    HS Certificate of Completion, 2009 - 2011
  • Mira Monte Indep. Studies
    HS diploma, 2012 - 2012
Links
Contributor to
Collections Kenny is following
Work
Occupation
Student in mobile software and Web development at Saddleback College in Mission Viejo, CA
Employment
  • Green Thumb International
    Nursery attendant, 2013 - 2015
    Resumed the 2010-11 job in August 2013, only for a barrage of drought layoffs to commence in February 2015
  • Green Thumb International
    Nursery attendant, 2010 - 2011
  • Nike, Inc.
    Warehouse upkeeper, 2012 - 2012
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Dating, A relationship
Birthday
April 14, 1993
Relationship
Single
Seriously, I have absolutely no idea what the two negative review-less scores are about. The baristas are extremely friendly. The frappuccinos, refreshers, hot chocolate, lattes, and other drinks (with the exception of black coffee, which is *always* bitter and therefore horrible-tasting no matter where you go) are *all* beyond incredible. The various pastries are all delectable, and the atmosphere? Well, let's just say it's not only good for studying, socializing, and using my Chromebook (which, by the way, there's also free Wi-Fi), but also feels just like home (i.e. an old house) for some people. For someone to have the nerve to post negative (1/3) scores sans reviews on this place (at least with a review, people can actually explain WHY they feel so bad) is absurd.
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Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
It's a grocery store. Don't mislabel it as an ATM location, please! Thanks...
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Simply put, despite how little I get here, what I have gotten (after having gone here multiple times, at least 50 or more, with my family since I was at least 2 or 3 years old) at this amazing Chinese restaurant has overall been nothing short of outstanding. The orange chicken is completely off the chart. The various soups are all total delicacies. The rice is cooked to just the right consistency -- not to hard, not too soft. The drink selection is beyond incredible. Even the appetizer chow mein noodles, when dipped in the right sauces, are transformed into pure awesomeness. The decorative murals that take up entire walls, *real* (in contrast to silk in some other restaurants) houseplants, bright white tablecloths, and off-the-chart plating make up the decor section of the review (which is absolutely outstanding). And, finally, of the countless times I've been here, there wasn't one incident where my family was treated with poor service. Not one! The servers are always friendly, always reliable (I haven't encountered one instance of an order misinterpretation), and always quick to deliver soups, salads, appetizers, and meals. After reading other reviews, I seriously feel somewhat bad for the others who don't feel so fortunate. That doesn't usually happen, and it certainly didn't happen for me one bit. And for those of you "low salt" naysayers: Last I checked, Chinese food (at least Sichuan, along with Thai and other cuisines) is supposed to be sweet and spicy, but NOT salty. And in those areas especially, the restaurant is absolutely outstanding.
• • •
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Back in June (8-11 to be specific), I stayed, ate, and rode back and forth to Mammoth from this very resort as part of a church retreat. I must admit, everything about this place was over the top. Food was excellent, the room I stayed in (although the beds were old) was of very good quality, and for the money, you get a much better deal by staying in Tom's Place and commuting to Mammoth than by staying in Mammoth Lakes and having to pay about 3x as much for lodging.
Quality: ExcellentFacilities: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago
11 reviews
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Technical support is through the roof. Whether it's a device defect or (if you have AppleCare+ coverage) a cracked screen, it won't just be fixed but replaced with a new device, and that's what makes it awesome. To be fair, open source software, like Android, tends to have trade-offs associated with it when it comes to technical support. You mess up the software, you're on your own. That's good for people like me that actually like to tinker, but for the "average Joe", the lack of technical support in Linux in one form or another is probably why Linux hasn't taken off like it should. Then again, GPL software does get over-the-air upgrades in a much more timely fashion than proprietary BSD and/or Apache forks, so...
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Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Let's face it, when you are as picky as me when it comes to food (i.e. "enough sweet onion sauce to cover *every* leaf of lettuce, *every* piece of chicken, and *every* olive"), you'll definitely love the amazing flexibility of the staff at this awesome place. Yes, the food is excellent (as you'd always expect from the Subway chain as a whole), and the drinks (including non-sodas) equally so. The decor reminds me of that in most authentic Italian (i.e. Peppino's, Olive Garden) restaurants (not to mention also, thanks to both her parents having immigrated from Italy, my grandmother's house 3000 miles away from here in extreme northeastern, i.e. rural Pike County, Pennsylvania), and it really adds to the place's awesomeness. So, overall, would definitely not be ashamed to give this place a perfect score.
• • •
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago