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Kenny Hemphill
78 followers -
Writer, editor, storyteller, technophile.
Writer, editor, storyteller, technophile.

78 followers
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A little thing I wrote about the way Tim Cook talks to his 'team.'
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I've interviewed quite a few independent guitar builders for my Guitar Hive project over the last few months. Several of them make really stunning guitars, but the Lee brothers win on originality. Taking inspiration from the streets of Johannesburg where they grew up, they make guitars from old oil cans.
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I once took a job as a commission only insurance salesman. It didn't go well. (Apologies for the headline, it wasn't my doing)
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An interesting perspective on Google+ and on recent Google initiatives.
What I learned on the way to 3 million Google+ circles.

I crossed the 3-million Google+ circles line this morning. http://goo.gl/mdil3m

It’s weird and thrilling to have so many “followers,” and to be sandwiched in circle counts between Paris Hilton, who has a couple hundred thousand more circles than I do, and Rihanna, who will probably catch up to me and pass me at some point in the future. (One of the great things about Google+ is that the geeks hold their own against entertainers in popularity.)

But mostly, it’s been an eye-opening adventure for me. Here’s what I learned along the way. 

http://www.cultofandroid.com/50078/learned-way-3-million-google-circles/

#GooglePlus
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Lovely remembrance of Steve Jobs from Stephen Wolfram.
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'Perhaps the greatest insight of Steve Jobs, when it came to design, was that the most beautiful, marvellous creation on earth is not the computer, but the person using it.'

That's as good a summation as I've seen.
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I arrived at MacUser in January 1997, the week that Gil Amelio took to the stage for his last Macworld keynote. Apple had by then announced, just before Christmas 1996, that its search for a next-generation operating system to replace what was then System 7 had ended. The company hadn’t, as many pundits expected, bought Be Inc and decided to bet its future on BeOS. Nor had it resurrected Copland, the defunct project which was supposed to be the Mac’s passport to the 21st Century. Instead it had turned to its co-founder and the company he had spent the previous decade building, NeXT.
Apple, explained Amelio, had bought NeXT and the right to use its Unix-based NeXTSTEP OS. That would be the future of the Mac. It was the best, perhaps the only really good, decision Amelio made as CEO of Apple. With NeXT came Jobs, as special advisor. And with Jobs came a team of lieutenants, people like Avie Tevanian, Jon Rubinstein, and Mitch Mandich (though thankfully not former NeXT board-member, Ross Perot). All of them would play a crucial role in re-building Apple, but none more so than Jobs.
It didn’t take long for Amelio to realise that he wasn’t going to turn Apple around, and it took even less time, following Amelio’s resignation, for the board to turn to Jobs. The company maintained the charade for a year or two that Jobs was CEO on an interim basis only, iCEO. But who else could lead Apple if not him?
For the next 14 years, my professional life was, from a distance, bound to that of Jobs and Apple. It never once felt like a job. It was fun, play, excitement, occasionally thrilling. But never just a job.
Millions of words have been and will be written about the man and his leadership of Apple, as well as his contribution to the technology industry. For me, one thing stood out: Steve Jobs got people. He understood them in a way few of us do. He knew how to recruit brilliant people, and how to get the best from them. He knew when to push them, when to flatter them, and, sometimes, when to scare the shit out of them. Steve Jobs knew how people use technology, what we want from it. He instinctively understood why some stuff works brilliantly and other stuff fails. And, of course, he knew how to sell it to us.
I’ve read a great deal of crap today about what will or won’t happen to Apple in the coming years. Just like predictions of future product launches, none of us really knows. None of us knows how much of Apple was bound up in Steve Jobs. How much of the heart and soul of the company depended on him. Nor how long his influence will last.
We do know, however, that Jobs picked winners. That he recruited and mentored superstars, and that many of them now shoulder the responsibility of running the company he built and then re-built. It’s an onerous task, but I for one have faith.
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