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Kenny G. Villacorta S.
Attended Chicago State University
Lives in Chicago, IL
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Kenny G. Villacorta S.

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The eight-year-old was diagnosed with bone cancer and has just weeks to live - but she's making every moment count with a bucket list of must-do activities.
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Kenny G. Villacorta S.

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The Supreme Court's disastrous Citizens United decision opened the door for Republicans to rig our elections. That's why we're fighting to end Citizens United once and for all. Paid for by End Citizens United. Privacy Policy.
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Astronaut Terry Virts captured this photo from the International Space Station flying over Boston, where Leonard Nimoy was born.

#RIPLeonardNimoy
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Kenny G. Villacorta S.

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Pioneering physicist Shirley Ann Jackson '68 PhD '73 was the first black woman to earn a doctorate from MIT. She is currently the president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Timeline of diversity at MIT from The Tech: http://mitsha.re/1AoXlBI

#TBT   #MIThistory   #blackhistorymonth   #bhm2015   #blackandstem   #womeninstem  
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Let's get the good stuff out of the way above the fold. Raspberry Pi 2 is now on sale for $35 (the same price as the existing Model B+), featuring: A 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU (~6x performance); 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM (2x memory); Complete compatibility with Raspberry Pi 1 ...
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Kenny G. Villacorta S.

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Today we’re hanging out with some of the bravest construction guys ever assembled in the city: those who helped build the original World Trade Center and those who’ve been finishing up on the Freedom Tower. In 1979, photographer Peter B. Kaplan spent 12 days shooting the crew as they installed a new piece of the communications antenna to the top of the World Trade Center’s North Tower. The antenna was added to the North Tower in 1978 and exten...
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PARIS—Following the fatal terrorist attack Wednesday at the offices of French newspaper Charlie Hebdo, sources confirmed this afternoon that it is sadly not yet clear whether this very article will ultimately put human lives at risk. 
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#road   #trip  
Randy Olson uses machine learning to find the optimal road trip across the U.S.
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#waldo  
Randy Olson uses machine learning techniques to find the best search strategy for finding Waldo.
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Today in History

On this day in 1954, a group of children from Arsenal Elementary School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, receive the first injections of the new polio vaccine developed by Dr. Jonas Salk.

Though not as devastating as the plague or influenza, poliomyelitis was a highly contagious disease that emerged in terrifying outbreaks and seemed impossible to stop. Attacking the nerve cells and sometimes the central nervous system, polio caused muscle deterioration, paralysis and even death. Even as medicine vastly improved in the first half of the 20th century in the Western world, polio still struck, affecting mostly children but sometimes adults as well. The most famous victim of a 1921 outbreak in America was future President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, then a young politician. The disease spread quickly, leaving his legs permanently paralyzed.

In the late 1940s, the March of Dimes, a grassroots organization founded with President Roosevelt's help to find a way to defend against polio, enlisted Dr. Jonas Salk, head of the Virus Research Lab at the University of Pittsburgh. Salk found that polio had as many as 125 strains of three basic types, and that an effective vaccine needed to combat all three. By growing samples of the polio virus and then deactivating, or "killing" them by adding a chemical called formalin, Salk developed his vaccine, which was able to immunize without infecting the patient.

After mass inoculations began in 1954, everyone marveled at the high success rate--some 60-70 percent--until the vaccine caused a sudden outbreak of some 200 cases. After it was determined that the cases were all caused by one faulty batch of the vaccine, production standards were improved, and by August 1955 some 4 million shots had been given. Cases of polio in the U.S. dropped from 14,647 in 1955 to 5,894 in 1956, and by 1959 some 90 other countries were using Salk's vaccine.   

A later version of the polio vaccine, developed by Albert Sabin, used a weakened form of the live virus and was swallowed instead of injected. It was licensed in 1962 and soon became more popular than Salk's vaccine, as it was cheaper to make and easier for people to take. There is still no cure for polio once it has been contracted, but the use of vaccines has virtually eliminated polio in the United States. Globally, there are now around 250,000 cases each year, mostly in developing countries. The World Health Organization has set a goal of eradicating polio from the entire world by 2010.

|| +Amazing things in the world 
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Diamonds and rings weren't forever
 
How an Ad Campaign Invented the Diamond Engagement Ring http://trib.al/L5ToJJT
In the 1930s, few Americans proposed with the precious stone. Then everything changed.
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Kenny G. Villacorta S.

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Have him in circles
364 people
Christian Nordqvist's profile photo
Steve Osborne's profile photo
Oleg Delosgatos's profile photo
Valeria Bitanescu's profile photo
Maitre Games's profile photo
John Perrin's profile photo
Spectacular Aurora Photography's profile photo
Orrin Ward's profile photo
alexia joubert's profile photo
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Currently
Chicago, IL
Previously
Lima, Peru - Caracas, Venezuela
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Education
  • Chicago State University
    2009
  • University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Harold Washington College
  • George Washington High School
  • Richard Daley College
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Nice area for fishing, bbqing, exercise, and enjoying nature. Buy your fishing license, keep your speed at the limit and your seat belt on, Conservation Police doesn't play around there. You can make picnic reservations online, alcohol prohibited.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
No delivery
Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Atmosphere: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
35 reviews
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Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Small World Inn Has reopened as of 11/26/2011 I only went to this place three times, it was good food.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago