Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Ken Morrill Jr
70 followers -
Media, Visual Arts and Design Educator/Facilitator, Riverside Middle School, Greer, SC
Media, Visual Arts and Design Educator/Facilitator, Riverside Middle School, Greer, SC

70 followers
About
Ken's posts

We're gearing up for the first ever RMS Student Trade Show and Art Exhibit! We'll be live tweeting it and hope to host a Google + Hangout for invite only guests.

Post has attachment
Watch our MakerBot create a SketchUp model in front of your eyes.

Post has attachment
Watch our MakerBot create a SketchUp model in front of your eyes.

Post has attachment
The 6th grade girls of the MIT Lab have dubbed themeselves the Unibunnies.  They've created a new video game called Unibunny v Dr. Unirendon.  The intro is posted on Scratch at http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/29171658/ .  You have to check this out!  Again, these are 6th grade girls.

Post has attachment
If you haven't already heard, we'll be having our first #mvadchat  at 7pm tonight (EST) on Twitter.  The discussion will focus on what MVAD is and what a 21st century visual arts program might look like.  Find more info here: http://mvadchat.weebly.com/mvadchat-1.html  I'd love to see you all there.

Post has attachment
I'm working on the new website for my new course at my new school.  http://riversidemvad.weebly.com/

Post has attachment
Excellent presentation! http://prezi.com/wn2d-3lymaeg/furman/

Post has attachment
Andrea and I visited the ruins at Tulum in July 2014.
Photo

Post has shared content
More info and an article published about the first annual SMS Student Tradeshow.
+Edutopia , +Peter H. Diamandis , +TED-Ed , +Sam Das , +Mitchel Resnick , I want to thank you for helping to inspire my students' trade show last week.  It was a huge success.  We were featured in two news outlets in town and are already planning for inquiry and project-based learning for next year.
http://www.golaurens.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=14686:innovative-assignment-gets-sms-students-thinking-far-into-the-future&catid=25&Itemid=129

Post has shared content
I wrote this last summer after presenting at a conference.  My goal was to link student engagement with technology to the Common Core Standards in an "art" classroom setting.  I tried to go beyond that in the presentation.  I think some administrators caught on.
I just returned from the SCASA (South Carolina Association of School Administrators) conference in Myrtle Beach, SC.  There were so many inspiring presenters (including myself) and education products there.  It was nice to be able to wade in the ocean and walk along the pier with my wife, too.
There are some points I took away with me which I desperately needed as a learning facilitator (teacher).  I will focus on two in this post, but will keep posting more as I go, much like +Peter H. Diamandis  does with his Espresso Shots videos. 

1. Students are not what they used to be:
Students today are different than they ever have been. This is said, usually in a negative way, about every generation. Granted, some kids in every school in every generation ever, have been defiant or academically deficient for various reasons, but our students now have different motives for learning (or not learning).  Their families look different and run on different schedules than those of the past. Students use a  wide variety of communication media and consume more media than at any point in the past.  This can be both good and not so good. Students are also less inhibited than ever before (in recorded public school history).  We see this as a bad thing when we laugh or sneer at the clothes they wear or hear the words they speak. I would argue that reduced inhibition is a wonderful trait. It pushes for greater freedom in a society which prides itself on democratic principles.

and

2. Too many of our teachers ARE what they used to be:
I'm not speaking from experience as a student. My teachers, for the most part, were very forward thinking. I do know teachers now who are far behind my teachers of the 80s and 90s. Digging our heels in and telling kids that when we were their age... you fill in the blank, doesn't solve any problems we perceive to exist.
It is our job to meet kids where they are and to help them develop knowledge and skills for a world whose challenges we are just beginning to see. Our culture and it's global position is in constant flux and so we must be. The constant shrinking of the world and it's flattening and expanding social and economic wealth are confusing even to those who deeply study it.  Who are we as educators to act and speak as if we know the outcomes of that fluctuation? We need to be able to say "I don't know, but we can look for resources as a team", when our students need guidance.

I'd love to go on with #2, but I want the conversation to start there. As this is my life, completely, I'm opening a community to solve great problems which face contemporary education systems. Many people, including +Bill Gates, have challenged us to tackle these problems. Help the great minds of our time make education a want, not just a need, for our kids. Join me at Xed. Bring your friends with you because we need as many ideas and solutions as we can get.
Wait while more posts are being loaded