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Katye Faulkner
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I was the recipient of a random act of kindness today, so sharing the inspiration with all of you:

"Today, the Boston Athletic Association and Boston Marathon Principal Sponsor John Hancock join the City of Boston in celebrating a new annual tradition: One Boston Day. One Boston Day is a city-wide celebration that recognizes the unity and strength of our city.

One Boston Day is a time when we as a community can honor and remember all of those affected by the tragic events of April 15, 2013. One Boston Day is also a day to come together and celebrate Boston's spirit, and the strength, resiliency, and compassion that epitomizes our city.

Mayor Marty Walsh established One Boston Day with the desire expressed by many survivors to pass on the kindness, generosity, and support they received following the 2013 Boston Marathon. The City of Boston will hold a moment of silence at 2:49 p.m. to mark the two-year anniversary, with church bells ringing throughout the city shortly after to pay tribute and celebrate the lives of those effected in April, 2013.

On One Boston Day, individuals, businesses, and organizations across the City will display their humanity and unity by encouraging random acts of kindness and spreading goodwill. One Boston Day is a chance for everyone to get involved, embodying the spirit of the Boston community. Whether it's giving up your seat on the T or saying 'thank you' to the City's police and fire personnel, we encourage everyone to take part in One Boston Day." #OneBostonDay
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That's really awesome!!
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Katye Faulkner

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Just discovered Anthony Hernandez art: http://anthonyhernandezart.com/Page%201.html
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The Rise of Superheroes and Their Impact On Pop Culture
EXCLUSIVE! When you complete a verified certificate in this course it will feature original artwork with both Stan Lee’s and Michael Uslan’s signature.

Thought of you two, +james crittenden  & +Akinola Emmanuel :)
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+Akinola Emmanuel Hopefully the happy couple still married you never know these days
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The Ethics of Eating
Explore the ethical issues you confront each time you decide what to eat or purchase food. Join a diverse group of philosophers, food scientists, activists, industry specialists, and farmers in this exciting discussion.

This free online course begins April 15th and will last 6 wks.
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transcript bits: ...and growing up in a bigoted household, I wasn't prepared for the real world. I'd been raised to judge people based on arbitrary measurements, like a person's race or religion.

(4:17)  *So what opened my eyes?* One of my first experiences that challenged this way of thinking was during the 2000 presidential elections. Through a college prep program, I was able to take part in the National Youth Convention in Philadelphia. My particular group's focus was on youth violence, and having been the victim of bullying for most of my life, this was a subject in which I felt particularly passionate. The members of our group came from many different walks of life. One day toward the end of the convention, I found out that one of the kids I had befriended was Jewish. Now, it had taken several days for this detail to come to light, and I realized that there was no natural animosity between the two of us. I had never had a Jewish friend before, and frankly I felt a sense of pride in having been able to overcome a barrier that for most of my life I had been led to believe was insurmountable. Another major turning point came when I found a summer job at Busch Gardens, an amusement park. There, I was exposed to people from all sorts of faiths and cultures, and that experience proved to be fundamental to the development of my character. Most of my life, I'd been taught that homosexuality was a sin, and by extension, that all gay people were a negative influence. As chance would have it, I had the opportunity to work with some of the gay performers at a show there, and soon found that many were the kindest, least judgmental people I had ever met. Being bullied as a kid created a sense of empathy in me toward the suffering of others, and it comes very unnaturally to me to treat people who are kind in any other way than how I would want to be treated. Because of that feeling, I was able to contrast the stereotypes I'd been taught as a child with real life experience and interaction. I don't know what it's like to be gay, but I'm well acquainted with being judged for something that's beyond my control.

(6:24) Then there was "The Daily Show." On a nightly basis, Jon Stewart forced me to be intellectually honest with myself about my own bigotry and helped me to realize that a person's race, religion or sexual orientation had nothing to do with the quality of one's character. He was in many ways a father figure to me when I was in desperate need of one. Inspiration can often come from an unexpected place, and the fact that a Jewish comedian had done more to positively influence my worldview than my own extremist father is not lost on me.

(7:04) One day, I had a conversation with my mother about how my worldview was starting to change, and she said something to me that I will hold dear to my heart for as long as I live. She looked at me with the weary eyes of someone who had experienced enough dogmatism to last a lifetime, and said, "I'm tired of hating people." In that instant, I realized how much negative energy it takes to hold that hatred inside of you.

(7:34) Zak Ebrahim is not my real name. I changed it when my family decided to end our connection with my father and start a new life. So why would I out myself and potentially put myself in danger? Well, that's simple. I do it in the hopes that perhaps someone someday who is compelled to use violence may hear my story and realize that there is a better way, that although I had been subjected to this violent, intolerant ideology, that I did not become fanaticized. Instead, I choose to use my experience to fight back against terrorism, against the bigotry. I do it for the victims of terrorism and their loved ones, for the terrible pain and loss that terrorism has forced upon their lives. For the victims of terrorism, I will speak out against these senseless acts and condemn my father's actions. And with that simple fact, I stand here as proof that violence isn't inherent in one's religion or race, and the son does not have to follow the ways of his father. I am not my father. ...
If you’re raised on dogma and hate, can you choose a different path? Zak Ebrahim was just seven years old when his father helped plan the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. His story is shocking, powerful and, ultimately, inspiring.
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 "I'm tired of hating people."
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Katye Faulkner

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More cool art. 
Thanks for the introduction, +james kalin .
 
A new 3D piece I've just finished 
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:)

yep, so many great artists on google plus (and elsewhere of course).
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Have her in circles
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Katye Faulkner

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Work hard for what you want because it won't come to you without a fight. You have to be strong and courageous and know that you can do anything you put your mind to. If somebody puts you down or criticizes you, just keep on believing in yourself and turn it into something positive.

Leah LaBelle
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A new sensor device, developed by a Stanford Ph.D. student, promises to change the way students, educators, and science enthusiasts explore the world — from elementary school to the Ph.D. lab and beyond. 

PocketLab is a wireless, durable, and easy-to-use sensor that enables you to gather information from the world. Appropriately branded the “Swiss Army knife of science,” the tiny device you can literally carry in your pocket packs an accelerometer, magnetometer, gyroscope, barometer, and thermometer, all of which seamlessly and instantaneously feed your tablet or smartphone with measurement data. You can start learning about magnetic fields, pressure, or acceleration in seconds. 

Clifton Roozeboom, co-founder and CEO of PocketLab, and a six-year Ph.D. student in mechanical engineering at Stanford says,

“What we saw in existing technology, was that it’s really expensive, or hard to use, and we wanted to provide something that is easy to use and is fun to go out in the world and explore with. [With PocketLab] you can start to experience the way science is really done.”

Now, whenever you or your kids have questions like, “How high did we hike today?” or “What happens when I collide the matchbox cars?” or “How fast am I going on my skateboard?” or “What’s the temperature in the ice box, and how quickly is it changing?” you can actually give precise answers. Just stick PocketLab in the cooler, tape it to a skateboard, or a car, or yourself. The collected data is displayed in real time and is easily integrated with Excel and Google Docs. In addition, PocketLab facilitates users to share the results of their experiments, search other people’s experiments, curate the data, and make it available to inspire others.

The device has already been thoroughly tested (“We have strapped the PocketLab onto bottle rockets, dropped it from the top of building, and, scariest of all, left it alone with some candy in a classroom of 5-year-olds”) and is now ready for manufacturing, to be sold for the affordable $129.

see link for video and more info
A new sensor device, developed by a Stanford Ph.D. student, promises to change the way students, educators, and science enthusiasts explore the world — from elementary school to the Ph.D. lab and beyond.
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+Richard Healy Me too!
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Biology for Voters FREE ONLINE COURSE

_Each year, voters are asked to make decisions on ballot initiatives on matters of biology, medicine, agriculture, the environment. Enroll in this course to learn how biology and your vote are connected.
About this Course_

Science plays a crucial role in your decisions as you go about your daily life. The representatives you elect and the legislation you vote on influences science legislation, limits and funding. This class will teach you fundamentals of modern biology to help you make more informed voting decisions. 

As you learn the fundamentals of Biology, we'll explore the scientific issues sparking political debate: 

Genetically modified food and genetically modified crops
Genetically modified organisms
Evolution vs. creationism
Reactions to pandemic disease
The risks and benefits of vaccination 
Obesity and health care costs 
How extinctions impact the planet
Space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life
Cancer research funding
Aging
Sexual behavior
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Looks like a good selection of topics and an interesting approach to teaching bio.
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Katye Faulkner

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Introduction to Bioethics
Introduction to Bioethics explores some of the most difficult - and fascinating - moral challenges we face in health, medicine, and emerging technologies.

Free online course! This is an important topic these days. 
Course begins April 15th and will finish in 15 wks. 
Estimated effort: 3-5 hrs/wk.
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Katye Faulkner

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World of Wine: From Grape to Glass
Learn about the principles and practices of how grapes are grown and wine is made. Confidently describe wine appearance, aroma, flavour and taste.

This free online course begins April 2nd! :) 
Course length: 6 wks. 
Estimated course effort: 2-3 hrs/wk
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First of all, understand that “meditation” is a catchall term for a lot of different mental activities, many of which have nothing to do with sitting cross-legged on the floor and saying om.

“There are thousands of different types of meditation,” says Dr. Andrew Newberg, a neuroscientist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and author of Words Can Change Your Brain. But while meditative practices come in all shapes and styles, Newberg says nearly all of them have at least one thing in common: They involve focusing your attention, a habit that’s been marginalized by our smartphone-tethered lifestyle of digital distraction.

“That focusing could be on a word or object or physical motion,” Newberg explains. “But regardless, the type of focusing involved in meditation activates the brain’s frontal lobe, which is involved in concentration, planning, speech and other executive functions like problem solving.” Studies have shown meditation can bolster all of these mental tasks. But the greatest benefits may spring from the interplay between your brain’s focus centers and its limbic system—a set of structures that manage your emotions and regulate the release of stress and relaxation hormones.

“Studies suggests your body’s arousal system is calmed and the flow of stress-related hormones is reduced [by meditation],” Newberg explains. “There’s also a softening effect when it comes to emotional responses.” Just as weightlifting allows your muscles to lift a heavier load, working out your brain with meditation seems to fortify its ability to carry life’s emotional cargo. That stress-dampening effect has tied meditation to improved mood and lower rates of heart disease, insomnia and depression.

Newberg says there’s also some evidence that meditation quiets the area of your brain that manages your sense of self and your relationship to others. That may sound like a bad thing, but this quieting may help you feel more connected to others and less isolated within yourself, he says. ...
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