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Katye Faulkner
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Katye Faulkner

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_ Neil deGrasse Tyson explains 10 things that we have heard all our life and re-told but are completely false. _
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Katye Faulkner

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The new technique enhances light absorption by 90 per cent across a broad spectrum, from the UV to the infrared.
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Katye Faulkner

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When it comes to science’s world-leading standouts, the world perversely limits its attention and esteem. For good reasons, the world loves Stephen Hawking and loves to follow his physics. For mysterious reasons, the world hardly even recognizes his late colleague, competitor, and science-pantheon peer Jacob Bekenstein, who died on 16 August.

This scanting constitutes an information paradox. How can science be so important in human history, yet see so much of the information about its most important human agents routinely ignored? A black hole sometimes lies between science and society.


But why so little public awareness of his late colleague Jacob Bekenstein?
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Physicists at Stanford and the University of British Columbia have found that encouraging students to repeatedly make decisions about data collected during introductory lab courses improves their critical thinking skills.
Physicists at Stanford and the University of British Columbia have found that encouraging students to repeatedly make decisions about data collected during introductory lab courses improves their critical thinking skills.
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Katye Faulkner

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THAT SORT OF PAINFUL, SORT OF BITTERSWEET, SORT OF WISTFUL FEELING YOU GET LOOKING OUT THE WINDOW OR DRIVING AT NIGHT OR LISTENING TO A FAR-OFF TRAIN WHISTLE? THERE'S A WORD FOR THAT IN JAPANESE.
That sort of painful, sort of bittersweet, sort of wistful feeling you get looking out the window or driving at night or listening to a far-off train whistle? There's a word for that in Japanese.
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Katye Faulkner

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Sharing an opportunity with the teachers among us.

*We’re seeking brilliant
explainers whose videos
help students succeed in
school and find joy in learning.*

Submit your videos by August 1st

The top ten finalists will receive
cash prizes—$3,000 for the
grand prize winner and $300
each for nine finalists. All
finalists will be considered for
longer-term video creation
contracts with Khan Academy.


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Katye Faulkner

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Science made me a better parent


Chefs can cook delightful meals for their families. Musicians can enliven social gatherings with friends. And having medical doctors, mechanics, or lawyers on call can be a great help if you get into trouble. As a biochemist with a PhD in molecular biology, however, I always felt that my professional skills were of little value outside the lab. Let's face it: As fun as they can be, cutting and pasting DNA and growing cells are not things that you do very often when you're home or out with friends. Until recently, I didn't think anything I had learned in the lab could be used in the rest of my life. Since I became a father, though, my view has been steadily changing.


I have found that parenthood is, in many ways, an extension of research: overcoming unknowns, learning constantly, and holding both a big responsibility and a great privilege. And neither science nor parenting is an individual endeavor. Whether you are giving a baby a bath or isolating mitochondria, teamwork is essential, and the list of collaborators can be quite long—including, in the case of parenting, partners, parents, siblings, uncles, aunts, and friends. As with the author list for a scientific paper, each of these players makes their own important contribution.

...

There is a Spanish proverb that says, "Patience is the mother of science," and I think that I now understand these three concepts -- patience, parenting, and science -- became so intertwined in the first place. Whether you are starting a PhD or becoming a parent, patience and perseverance will serve you well. The rest will come, after a few sleepless nights.


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Katye Faulkner

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About half way through The Twelve Days of Love Letter Writing! I look forward to this event each year. Totally fuels the jolly & generous holiday spirit. Enjoy!

copied from pg: Welcome to the 12 Days of Love Letter Writing! Each day December 7-18, a new letter request will be posted on this page. You have until the listed deadline to read the stories, script letters, and drop them in the mailbox for the addresses listed below. We sincerely hope you'll script beside us. 

xoxo, MLL


the 12 days of love letter writing have arrived!
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Katye Faulkner

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... 8:05 I am the exception, not because I'm more talented than Baakir or my mother worked any harder than Jobana, Sintia or Bertha, or cared any more than Theresa. Marginalized communities are full of smart, talented people, hustling and working and innovating, just like our most revered and most rewarded CEOs. They are full of people tapping into their resilience to get up every day, get the kids off to school and go to jobs that don't pay enough, or get educations that are putting them in debt. They are full of people applying their savvy intelligence to stretch a minimum wage paycheck, or balance a job and a side hustle to make ends meet. They are full of people doing for themselves and for others, whether it's picking up medication for an elderly neighbor, or letting a sibling borrow some money to pay the phone bill, or just watching out for the neighborhood kids from the front stoop.

9:04 I am the exception because of luck and privilege, not hard work. And I'm not being modest or self-deprecating -- I am amazing.

9:13 But most people work hard. Hard work is the common denominator in this equation, and I'm tired of the story we tell that hard work leads to success, because that allows --

9:32 ... because that story allows those of us who make it to believe we deserve it, and by implication, those who don't make it don't deserve it. We tell ourselves, in the back of our minds, and sometimes in the front of our mouths, "There must be something a little wrong with those poor people." We have a wide range of beliefs about what that something wrong is. Some people tell the story that poor folks are lazy freeloaders who would cheat and lie to get out of an honest day's work. Others prefer the story that poor people are helpless and probably had neglectful parents that didn't read to them enough, and if they were just told what to do and shown the right path, they could make it.

10:10 For every story I hear demonizing low-income single mothers or absentee fathers, which is how people might think of my parents, I've got 50 that tell a different story about the same people, showing up every day and doing their best. I'm not saying that some of the negative stories aren't true, but those stories allow us to not really see who people really are, because they don't paint a full picture. The quarter-truths and limited plot lines have us convinced that poor people are a problem that needs fixing. What if we recognized that what's working is the people and what's broken is our approach? What if we realized that the experts we are looking for, the experts we need to follow, are poor people themselves? What if, instead of imposing solutions, we just added fire to the already-burning flame that they have? Not directing -- not even empowering -- but just fueling their initiative.

11:21 Just north of here, we have an example of what this could look like: Silicon Valley. A whole venture capital industry has grown up around the belief that if people have good ideas and the desire to manifest them, we should give them lots and lots and lots of money.

11:41 Right? But where is our strategy for Theresa and Baakir? There are no incubators for them, no accelerators, no fellowships. How are Jobana, Sintia and Bertha really all that different from the Mark Zuckerbergs of the world? Baakir has experience and a track record. I'd put my money on him.

12:03 So, consider this an invitation to rethink a flawed strategy. Let's grasp this opportunity to let go of a tired, faulty narrative and listen and look for true stories, more beautifully complex stories, about who marginalized people and families and communities are.

...

14:06 Desmond Tutu talks about the concept of ubuntu, in the context of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation process that they embarked on after apartheid. He says it means, "My humanity is caught up, is inextricably bound up, in yours; we belong to a bundle of life." A bundle of life. The Truth and Reconciliation process started by elevating the voices of the unheard. If this country is going to live up to its promise of liberty and justice for all, then we need to elevate the voices of our unheard, of people like Jobana, Sintia and Bertha, Theresa and Baakir. We must leverage their solutions and their ideas. We must listen to their true stories, their more beautifully complex stories.

...

As a global community, we all want to end poverty. Mia Birdsong suggests a great place to start: Let's honor the skills, drive and initiative that poor people bring to the struggle every day. She asks us to look again at people in poverty: They may be broke — but they're not broken.
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Katye Faulkner

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excerpts: First impressions lead to a multitude of assumptions, and trustworthiness is one of them ...

Now a study by Brian Holtz suggests that a person's looks can colour perceptions, not only of how trustworthy their character might be, but of whether their actual deeds are fair and well-intentioned.

In an ideal world, we’d trust people based upon what they say and do, and use that track record to evaluate whether their subsequent actions were in good faith. These new results suggest that often isn't so -  *instead, our superficial impressions influence how we evaluate their behaviour*.

... Participants felt more trust towards the CEO and judged the decision as fairer when the CEO’s biography included a facial photo previously rated as highly trustworthy, rather than an untrustworthy one.

... This is fascinating and surprising to me - it suggests that a gut feeling, based on physical appearance, could have consequences for how we intellectually review a situation. ...

When we assume that certain facial characteristics can mark someone out as special - more electable, fit for higher rank, or a better captain of industry - these assumptions often become self-fulfilling.

... most of us like to believe that perceptions of trust go deeper and are truly shaped by a person’s ethics and actions. Yet the sad truth is, some faces seem to mark one out as an easy scapegoat, while others are able to get away with murder.
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This is particularly why I have a goofy pic for my profile.  I am setting expectations and then aim to dismantle them.  Yes, it is a harder road, but it is worth it.
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Katye Faulkner

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Sharing these spoils with all of you. :)
Whether you want to learn about the evolving solar energy industry, master data organization, or get lost in a classic novel, edX has a course for you. Tak
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