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Katherine Henry
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Attorney, Mediator, Christian Constitutional Policy Advocate
Attorney, Mediator, Christian Constitutional Policy Advocate

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I don't even have words for this level of hate
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As the Region 4 Coordinator for the Patrick Colbeck for Governor campaign, I am looking for those interested in assisting us in any way. If you know of a community event, local parade, tea party meeting, or other event for Senator Colbeck to attend, please let me know the details of the event. If you are willing to collect signatures to get him on the ballot, work a booth at a local event to engage voters in our area, host a community event or house party, or even donate funds to the campaign, please let me know. I have known Senator Colbeck since I attended my first Ted Cruz event in 2015, and I have been impressed with his commitment to God and his family, his passion for fighting for our freedoms and limited government, and his relentless efforts to keep engaged and connected with his constituents. I am blessed to have Pat and Angie Colbeck as my friends, and I know Michigan would be blessed to have him as our next Governor. Please send informational communications to KHenry4MI@gmail.com or text them to 616-303-0183. 

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Constitutional Carry bills pass
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6/7/17
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I'm sorry that this post is long, but once I saw what the state is claiming about homeschooling, I became very passionate about correcting its errors...The State of Michigan has a handout on homeschooling in Michigan (http://www.michigan.gov/documents/home_schools_122555_7.pdf). The State of Michigan’s handout on homeschooling states “A parent or legal guardian reporting to MDE must have a minimum bachelor’s degree to be approved unless they claim a sincerely held religious belief against teacher certification (People v DeJonge). Reporting is required if the parent or legal guardian is seeking eligible special education services for their child(ren).”

First, it is important to note that they failed to include the citation of that case, making it difficult for a person trying to go to the court’s opinion directly. For those wishing to look directly at the court case, it is found at 442 Mich. 266 (1993).

Second, it should be noted that when you dig around in the State’s website of the portion allocated to homeschooling, you finally find a copy of the DeJonge “case.” However, what is posted is NOT the entire court opinion. There are many key aspects missing from what appears on the State’s website version.

Third, it is important to note that the case was not about the requirement of a parent to hold a Bachelor’s degree in order to homeschool a child, but rather the state’s prior requirement that a parent hold a teaching certificate in order to homeschool a child.

Fourth, in the handout, the State implies that the DeJonge ruling reaffirms burdens on homeschooling parents, in favor of requirements put in place by the State. However, the court’s decision in that case clearly articulates - repeatedly - that the State in that case FAILED to show why it’s requirements (at least those at debate in that case) on homeschooling parents were permissible under our Constitutionally protected rights to educate our own children. “Nevertheless, the state in the instant case has failed to provide evidence or testimony that supports the argument that the certification requirement is essential to the preservation of its asserted interest….Furthermore, the experience of our sister states provides irrefutable evidence that the certification requirement is not an interest worthy of being deemed "compelling." The nearly universal consensus of our sister states is to permit home schooling without demanding teacher certified instruction. Indeed, many states have recently rejected the archaic notion that certified instruction is necessary for home schools. Within the last decade, over twenty states have repealed teacher certification requirements for home schools. The relevance of the practice of our sister states becomes clear when empirical studies disprove a positive correlation between teacher certification and quality education. A study by Dr. Brian Ray of the National Home Education Research Institute found that ‘there was no [statistically significant] difference in students' total reading, total math, or total language scores based on the teacher certification status (i.e., neither parent had been certified, one had been, or both had been) of their parents.’ The compelling nature of the teacher certification requirement is not extant.”

Fifth, the wording of the State’s handout states that the court in the DeJonge case requires homeschooling parents to have a Bachelor’s degree unless they claim a sincerely held religious belief against teacher certification. That is just plain WRONG. The DeJonges appealed their case to the Supreme Court because the teacher certification requirement violated their religious beliefs, thus it violated their rights under the Free Exercise Clause. The court NEVER said that a religious belief is the only way a state mandate on homeschooling would be held unconstitutional. In fact, it said that although Art 8 Sec 1 of our Michigan Constitution “proclaims the vital nature of education in Michigan … Nevertheless our rights are meaningless if they do not permit an individual to challenge and be free from those abridgements of liberty that are otherwise vital to society.” [Note, there is NO mention to only religious rights, but rather the general reference to “our rights.”] The court also quoted a US Supreme Court Case “Thus, a State's interest in universal education, however highly we rank it, is not totally free from a balancing process when it impinges on fundamental rights and interests…”

Sixth, for nearly 100 years, our US Supreme Court has held that parents have a right under the 14th Amendment “to direct the upbringing and education of children under their control,” thus the State must meet a high burden in order to infringe upon this right. Pierce v. Society of Sisters, 268 U.S. 510 (1925)

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Check out Colbeck for Governor (@ColbeckForGov): https://twitter.com/ColbeckForGov?s=09

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Sanctuary City update from House Speaker Tom Leonard:
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Update from House Speaker Tom Leonard
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