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Kateryna Artyushkova
Works at UNM
Attended Kent State University
Lives in Albuquerque, NM
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Kateryna Artyushkova

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‘The ability to do single cell analysis, to get the identities and states of each of the cells, is the final revolution in this field. It’s the equivalent of an amazing new microscope’ 
 
In the last 2 years, Israelis developed 11 different ways to treat cancer and heart problems (amongst thousands of other scientific advancements such as the one below).

... In the meanwhile, Arabs developed 7+ new execution methods.
In Israel for Broad Institute conference, Eric Lander, pioneer of Human Genome Project, marvels at speed with which ‘new genomics’ opens ways to fight disease
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Kateryna Artyushkova

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I always suspected they were robots!
 
Why Do Seahorses Have Square Tails?    
Seahorse tails are peculiar appendages. Unlike those of most animals, the cross-section of a seahorse tail is shaped like a square prism rather than the usual cylinder. Further increasing their mystique, seahorses do not use their tails for swimming, as other fish do, but rather as giant fingers used for anchoring on coral or snatching up tasty shrimp that stray too near.

The seahorse tail is so idiosyncratic that it might be an asset for the field of robotics. American and Belgian researchers are turning to the odd extremity for clues about how to better design flexible but strong grasping devices. As they report in Science, seahorse-inspired creations could find applications in search-  and -rescue missions, industry, medicine and more. 

In order to figure out why the seahorse tail is square while so many other animal’s tails are round (rats, lizards, monkeys, cats, etc.), scientists printed out 3D replicas of the square tails and similarly sized round tails.

The researchers ran experiments on both models in which they applied various degrees of crushing and distorting pressure. They found that while the cylindrical tail gets smooshed and damaged if enough force is applied, the square tail flattens out by allowing its bony plates to slide past each other, deflecting damage away from the vertebral column and giving it the ability to absorb more energy before it is broken.

Paper:
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/349/6243/aaa6683.abstract

Full article: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/why-seahorses-have-square-tails-180955802/#LgoBAjJk8vgRWJQ4.99

Images via Wikipedia Commons and Smithsonian Magazine.
illustrations: Michael Porter, Clemson Univ.

#biodiversity   #research   #seahorse   #3dprinting  
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Kateryna Artyushkova

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"A poll finds women tend to oppose genetically modified food and animal research, and African Americans are optimistic about population growth, regardless of political party." via +Marjolein Caniels 
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This is amazing! #253l
 
A fantastic invention: Jie Bao (of Tsinghua University) and Moungi Bawendi (of MIT) have invented an optical spectrometer small and cheap enough to attach to a cell phone, which can nonetheless perform comparably well to serious professional equipment.

Spectrometers are amazingly useful devices: they simply break light up through a prism, and report on how bright the light is in each frequency. That lets you recognize chemicals (each molecule has a distinctive color "fingerprint"), measure temperature (when you heat an object, it glows with a spectrum that's a simple function of temperature), and even measure the speed of objects. (If you know something's color when it's still, its colors in motion are shifted by the Doppler effect, just like an approaching siren's pitch goes up and a receding one goes down. The fingerprints of chemical colors give you an excellent reference point for that)

Bao and Bawendi's device is completely different from traditional spectrometers: Rather than using a prism and precision optics, they use an array of 195 carefully chosen inks and a CCD light sensor. The result is rugged and cheap – a few dollars, instead of a few hundred or thousand.

This is a tool that could revolutionize all sorts of devices; the authors give an example of a tool that could identify skin cancer just by pointing at it. (Cancers contain specific chemicals which produce specific optical fingerprints, after all!)

And more to the point, it's neat.

Dear Drs. Bao and Bawendi: TAKE MY MONEY!

Via +California Academy of Sciences.
A spectrometer that fits in your mobile devices could let you scan yourself for skin cancer.
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The tricorder is almost here. 
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LOL!! The Oatmeal is always funny....;)
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With  3D printing method, researches are able to fabricate robotic microfish using three different types of functional nanoparticles including iron oxide, which can be magnetically guided; platinum, which can be chemically guided; and polydiacetylene (PDA) which can be used for neutralizing harmful toxins.
Many futurists envision a time in the not too distant future where we will all have tiny little microbots swimming within our bloodstreams, protecting us from t
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Kateryna Artyushkova

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A team of statisticians from Cornell University in the US has modelled the spread of a fictitious zombie plague travelling across the US. And the results are not unexpected. 
In the event of a zombie apocalypse, it's imperative that you have a plan . If you're influenced by the movies, then you might be inclined to take your chances and head for the nearest pub or shopping mall in order to outwit a growing horde of...
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You'd want to find a mid sized island on a remote lake somewhere, and go fishing/farming.
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Try this. Not surprising that we are over-complicating everything.
A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America, and why no one likes to be wrong.
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Got it. Definitely a trick presenting the familiar first sequence like they did.
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"In the real world, it appears possible that such networks would allow something to seem much more popular than it really is, because it is being disseminated by just a few well-connected nodes, whether it is a video of a cat doing something stupid, or a minority opinion about a well known topic."
A trio of researchers at the University of California has uncovered a social-network illusion that might explain why some things become popular in cyberspace while others do not. Kristina Lerman, Xiaoran Yan and Xin-Zeng Wu have written a paper describing the illusion and how it works and have posted ...
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Gray says he could likely make quilts to order featuring your favorite molecule. He tells Newscripts he’d be able to make a quilt featuring almost any small molecule; most drugs would be the right size, for example.
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He lives here in Champaign-Urbana!
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I'm in spotlight. Cause I'm miss July in STC calendar.
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Very cool!
A tennis ball is squishy and bouncy and totally perfect for slow motion fun. Watch as a tennis racket hits the fuzzy yellow green ball at 142mph in slow motion, it’s incredible. The more you slow it down, the more flattened and deformed and goo-like the ball gets. At a certain point, it looks like the ball has just been absorbed and eaten alive by the tennis racket.
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research professor
Employment
  • UNM
    research professor, present
  • KSU
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Currently
Albuquerque, NM
Previously
Kiev, Ukraine - Kent, OH
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Introduction
Analytical chemists by training... god knows who by experience. Research professor at Chem & Nucl Eng department at UNM. Doing material characterization and statistical data analysis for energy technologies, fuel cells, electrocatalysts, biocatalysis, etc...

Bragging rights
2 miracle kids, beautiful husband,originally from Ukraine, in love with numbers
Education
  • Kent State University
    Chemistry, 1997 - 2001
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Gender
Female
Other names
Katya
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