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Karol Kuczmarski
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Here's a useful library for all you Python coders out there.
If you ever wished for better options when verifying how your mocks have been called in tests, check out callee, a library of argument matchers I've just released:

https://github.com/Xion/callee

It allows you write assertions such as these:

mock_foo.assert_called_with(String() & LongerOrEqual(16))

mock_requests.get.assert_called_with(
String() & StartsWith('https://'),
params=Dict(String(), String()))

# etc.

Works with both the standard unittest.mock module from Python 3.3, and it's backport to 2.6+.

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Here's a useful library for all you Python coders out there.
If you ever wished for better options when verifying how your mocks have been called in tests, check out callee, a library of argument matchers I've just released:

https://github.com/Xion/callee

It allows you write assertions such as these:

mock_foo.assert_called_with(String() & LongerOrEqual(16))

mock_requests.get.assert_called_with(
String() & StartsWith('https://'),
params=Dict(String(), String()))

# etc.

Works with both the standard unittest.mock module from Python 3.3, and it's backport to 2.6+.

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If you ever wished for better options when verifying how your mocks have been called in tests, check out callee, a library of argument matchers I've just released:

https://github.com/Xion/callee

It allows you write assertions such as these:

mock_foo.assert_called_with(String() & LongerOrEqual(16))

mock_requests.get.assert_called_with(
String() & StartsWith('https://'),
params=Dict(String(), String()))

# etc.

Works with both the standard unittest.mock module from Python 3.3, and it's backport to 2.6+.

Useful #git aliases everyone should have:

alias yolo='git add -A && git commit -m "DEAL WITH IT" && git push -f'
alias whatever='git commit -m "$(curl http://www.whatthecommit.com/index.txt)"'
alias imfeelinglucky='git stash apply $(git stash list --format='%H' | sort --random-sort | head -n 1)'

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Hey, I made this!
Among dozens of other people, of course, but still! :D
Today we’re excited to announce the new and improved Google+ experience for mobile web. We focused on making everything faster, more beautiful, and more intuitive. To check out all the new updates, visit plus.google.com on your phone or tablet’s browser.  
As always, we’d love to hear what you think!  

#googleplusupdate
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The last day of a year asks for making predictions, but prophesying for just 12 months ahead is quite trivial. Instead, I took the chance of peering no less than 10,000 years into the future, to extrapolate how the IT industry -- and indeed, the human race alongside it -- will have panned out in the long run.

Here are the highlights:

* The average person's palm will be about 50% longer and 30% broader than now, evolved to stay abreast with the ever-increasing dimensions of hand-held devices.

* Two major religions will have remained, both drawing their doctrine from the immeasurable, ancient holy book of Wikipedia. Though scholarly theologians would have obviously disagreed, the only discernible difference between them will be the invocation which their adherents start their multiple daily prayers with: either "Hey Siri" or "OK Google".

* The programming world will have witnessed many shifts between the dominance of high-level, free-form, dynamic, abstract languages; and the more efficient, rigid, low-level ones that are compiled straight to machine code and executed directly by the hardware. Invariably, said machine language will be, of course, JavaScript.

* A significant portion of the global economy will be related to purchase, selling, and re-selling of the extremely old, short and memorable Twitter/Instagram user handles.

* The Linux kernel, and the related software stack, will have been ported to innumerable hardware platforms of vastly different architecture and form factor, including, but not limited to: subcutaneous tattoos; intelligent wallpapers; airborne nanoparticles; soccer field turf (thus helping solve the age-old dilemma of "Was that an offside?"); and bacon (to precisely control heat intake from a frying pan, ensuring perfect crispness). Despite this incredible pervasiveness, there will be no sign of its wider adoption on primary personal computers.

* Countless programming language will have risen to popularity which rivals that of C++, Java, or PHP today. However, all of their semantic innovations will be just reimplementations of existing features from some obscure dialect of today's Lisp. Also, at no point will those popular languages ever include Haskell.

The last day of a year asks for making predictions, but prophesying for just 12 months ahead is quite trivial. Instead, I took the chance of peering no less than 10,000 years into the future, to extrapolate how the IT industry -- and indeed, the human race alongside it -- will have panned out in the long run.

Here are the highlights:

* The average person's palm will be about 50% longer and 30% broader than now, evolved to stay abreast with the ever-increasing dimensions of hand-held devices.

* Two major religions will have remained, both drawing their doctrine from the immeasurable, ancient holy book of Wikipedia. Though scholarly theologians would have obviously disagreed, the only discernible difference between them will be the invocation which their adherents start their multiple daily prayers with: either "Hey Siri" or "OK Google".

* The programming world will have witnessed many shifts between the dominance of high-level, free-form, dynamic, abstract languages; and the more efficient, rigid, low-level ones that are compiled straight to machine code and executed directly by the hardware. Invariably, said machine language will be, of course, JavaScript.

* A significant portion of the global economy will be related to purchase, selling, and re-selling of the extremely old, short and memorable Twitter/Instagram user handles.

* The Linux kernel, and the related software stack, will have been ported to innumerable hardware platforms of vastly different architecture and form factor, including, but not limited to: subcutaneous tattoos; intelligent wallpapers; airborne nanoparticles; soccer field turf (thus helping solve the age-old dilemma of "Was that an offside?"); and bacon (to precisely control heat intake from a frying pan, ensuring perfect crispness). Despite this incredible pervasiveness, there will be no sign of its wider adoption on primary personal computers.

* Countless programming language will have risen to popularity which rivals that of C++, Java, or PHP today. However, all of their semantic innovations will be just reimplementations of existing features from some obscure dialect of today's Lisp. Also, at no point will those popular languages ever include Haskell.

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“This document is currently being used in production at several large sites, but there are some experiences and intimations which scar too deeply to permit of healing, and leave only such an added sensitiveness that memory reinspires all the original horror.”

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Method #2 surely looks like perfectly acceptable workaround!

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Perfect stress relief
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