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Karim Yaghmour
Works at Opersys inc.
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Karim Yaghmour

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Rich people prefer smaller screens and less freedom?
 
This is fascinating.

This article contains heap maps of where Android and iPhone users live, and concludes that "Android Is For People With Less Money".

Could the impassioned arguments of Android vs iPhone be another battle front of class warfare?

Another interesting find in the article: Japan and South Korea are the only two countries that see more revenue on Google Play vs the App Store.

http://www.businessinsider.com/android-is-for-poor-people-maps-2014-4
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Karim Yaghmour

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But, but, but ... wearables is the future.
The sportswear company has decided that only software has a future in Nike’s technology vision. That means cutting the FuelBand, including a slimmer version planned for the fall.
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Nike is better off going the licensed merchandise route anyway. Smart.
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Karim Yaghmour

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Looks like one of CyanogenMod's core founders jumped ship. Intriguing.

I can see a services-based business model. I can't see the VC one. But I can be wrong.
 
Hey, I did an interview!

Read the comments... Man, people really love their SD Cards...
Koushik Dutta, better known as "Koush" to the Android power user community, was one of the original Cyanogen, Inc. employees when the company incorporated... by Michael Crider in Features, Interviews, News
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Karim Yaghmour

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New kid on the block
 
LG to do more of their own awesome new ARM Processors, will they share those with all the other brands more than Samsung does?
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they can always go to Intel...
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Have him in circles
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Karim Yaghmour

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A tour of TSMC's facilities -- and the manufacturing process if you aren't familiar with it.
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Karim Yaghmour

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Karim Yaghmour

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Truly awesome 3D mapping
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everything is awesome!

but yeah, this is good stuff.
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Karim Yaghmour

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What's next? OpenSSL action figures?

h/t +Jeffrey Osier-Mixon 
 
I'm heading out to buy some crayons!
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As always, journalists do an awesome job at accurately recounting history.
 
For several years now, mobile device manufacturers have been in a race to push the pixel density of mobile devices higher and higher. The race began with the iPhone 4 “Retina” display – an at the time impressive 330 pixels per inch (PPI) 960x480 3.5” display.

sigh  No, it did not.

Android started it on modern smart phones, with the original Droid that was 240dpi, and the platform itself introduced the robust multi-density support we have today a bit before that in 1.6, including full support for retina class and the ever increasing densities we see today.

But you know what?  It doesn't make sense to say that Android started this, either.  In fact Android from the start had core support for multiple display densities (through the dp units and such), but this happened because of previous experience at PalmSource where Palm devices had already experienced increases in display density, going from the original ~80dpi screen to high resolution 160dpi screens, and then trying to deal with 120dpi screens to be able to use then pervasive 240x320 panels.

The troubles of that last step -- trying to implement 1.5x scaling on a system where apps are using absolute layout of UI elements in pixel coordinates and the resulting strange rounding artifacts -- is a major element of what drove Android's original design.  To be able to do non-integral scalings well, Android relies on layout managers to do final placement of UI elements, which run at the native screen resolution.  The use of layout managers not only makes it a lot easier for applications to adjust to different screen sizes, but also allows scaling screen density by non-integral amounts without causing odd spacing between interface elements or having to use sub-pixel positioning of all elements and the resulting anti-aliasing artifacts.
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I hate to say something positive about brokenmoko, but they were shipping a 'retina' phone before android became public. And before that sharp had pdas with screen that either were retina or very close to it.
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Have him in circles
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