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Karen Kaplan
Works at Los Angeles Times
Attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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Karen Kaplan

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If you haven't seen the ‪#‎scienceamoviequote‬ tweets, stop what you're doing and check them out now. You won't be disappointed. Here's the backstory: http://lat.ms/1F3WSWj
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Baby aspirin may do more than cut your risk of heart attacks and stroke. This large study shows it may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer as well. So do other types of NSAIDs. Researchers suspect they block production of prostaglandin, which helps colorectal cancer spread.
Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, and researchers say they have found a way to reduce one’s risk of it by up to 45% – by taking aspirin, Advil, Motrin, Aleve or certain other painkillers.
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Here's a useful Rx to lower your risk of stroke: Work less. In a new study involving hundreds of thousands of people, those who worked at least 55 hours per week were 33% more likely to have a stroke than those who worked 35 to 40 hours per week.
Do you worry that your workaholic ways are killing you? A new study says you may be right.
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With more than 500,000 pieces of space junk in Earth orbit, it's kind of hard to believe this has only happened four times. The flight director in Houston suggested an interesting way to fight space junk: a laser-wielding space sharknado!
A small piece of an old Russian weather satellite forced the crew of the International Space Station to take cover in an escape vehicle for a short time Thursday.
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In California, the annual number of shark attacks has risen since 1950, but the rate of attacks has plunged by 91%. In fact, a Californian is about 1,800 times more likely to drown than be bitten by a white shark.
California may be plagued by earthquakes, brush fires and a record-breaking drought. But here’s one way life has gotten better in the Golden State: The risk of being attacked by a shark has plunged.
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Three out of four Americans say the minimum age to buy cigarettes should be 21, not 18. Support for this idea is widespread -- there's very little variance based on race, region or educational level. Even among current smokers, 70% say they "strongly" or "somewhat" favor moves to raise the minimum tobacco age to match the drinking age.
You have to be 21 to buy alcohol in the U.S., and most Americans agree that the same age requirement should apply for buying cigarettes and other tobacco products.
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Karen Kaplan

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A sleepy surgeon is still a good surgeon. Researchers in Canada analyzed the outcomes of nearly 40,000 surgeries. Half were done when surgeons had been up working the previous night (or early morning). The other half were done by the exact same surgeons when they got a full night's sleep. Patients were no more likely to die, or have complications, or need to be readmitted to the hospital when their doctors had been up late (or early) as they were when the doctors were well rested.
The pager goes off at 2 a.m., alerting the on-call surgeon that a patient needs immediate care. The situation is resolved a few hours later, and she’s able to get a little more shut-eye before her regularly scheduled patients are wheeled into the operating room.
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Certainly these (male) doctors weren't treating their (female) patients with the utmost respect. Was it sexual abuse? A case of letting off steam? Or something else?
A man stroked the inner thighs and genitals of a woman who lay unconscious on a table. “I bet she’s enjoying this,” he said with a wink and a laugh.
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They LOOK healthy, but do some of them actually have an eating disorder? New research suggests 29% of men who work out regularly and use LEGAL bodybuilding supplements are using them to skip meals or otherwise damage their health. In fact, 3% of those surveyed said the supplements caused kidney or liver damage that sent them to the hospital.
Gym rats may seem to be the picture of good health, but a new study suggests that many men who prioritize their workouts are abusing legal bodybuilding supplements to achieve their lean and muscular look.
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Need to get up to speed on +NASA's New Horizons mission before Tuesday's #plutoflyby ? Here's a handy cheat sheet that tells you everything you need to know. 
NASA's New Horizons is the first spacecraft designed to study objects in the Kuiper belt, the region of the solar system beyond Neptune. After traveling 3 billion miles, the craft is about to fly by Pluto, giving humanity its first detailed look at the dwarf planet and its large moon, Charon. New...
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How do giant pandas survive on a bamboo diet? By using only 38% of the energy typically required of animals their size. Smaller brains and a single genetic mutation help make this possible, among other adaptations. Here's how scientists got to the bottom of the mystery.
How do giant pandas get by on  a diet that consists almost entirely of bamboo? They manage to expend only 38% of the energy typical of animals their size, new research shows.
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Is it a planet? Is it a comet? Astronomers call it "The Behemoth," and it certainly had them scratching their heads.
They call it "the Behemoth." Astronomers using NASA ’s Hubble Space Telescope have discovered that a red dwarf star is boiling off the atmosphere of a Neptune-sized exoplanet, causing it to form an enormous cloud that surrounds and trails the planet like a comet’s tail.
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Have her in circles
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Đỗ Văn Hồng's profile photo
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Science journalist
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  • Los Angeles Times
    Editor for Science & Medicine, present
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Editor for Science & Medicine at the Los Angeles Times. Many of my posts appear on Booster Shots and Science Now.
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  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Economics
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Political Science
  • Columbia University
    Journalism
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Karen Kaplan's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Welcome to Elephant Heart Jewelry - Beautiful Hand-Made Necklaces, Earri...
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Welcome to Elephant Heart Jewelry. Our newly enhanced website features over 120 beautiful, hand-made necklaces, earrings and bracelets.

A window to the brain? It's here, says UC Riverside team
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Engineers fashion a zirconium based window pane and use it to optically scan a mouse's brain.

Ostrich necks provide clues to how sauropod dinosaurs moved, ate
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How did sauropod dinosaurs move their heads? When they stood, were their super-long necks stretched up high to the treetops like a giraffe's

Ants make tough choices better when working in groups, study says
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Our society often touts teamwork, but when faced with an easy task, groups may actually perform worse than individuals – at least when the g

Addiction expert weighs in on Mayor Bob Filner's therapy plan
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San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, 70, announced Friday that he will enter a “behavioral counseling clinic” on Aug. 5 to deal with issues relating

Tall women have higher cancer risk; are smoking, drinking to blame?
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The taller a postmenopausal woman is, the greater risk she faces of developing cancer, according to a new study.

Ramadan fast survival guide will help you stay fit and healthy
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We're about halfway through the Islamic holy month of Ramadan . This is the time of year when an estimated 1.6 million Muslims worldwide abs

You may be safer living in the city than the country, study finds
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Want to keep your family safe? Then raise your kids in the city.

Are doctors passing the buck on healthcare costs?
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Physicians are concerned about skyrocketing healthcare costs -- but most don't think they have "major responsibility" for reducing those cos

Another way TV is harmful to kids: By falling on them
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The nation's pediatricians keep saying that television can be harmful for babies and toddlers, but this time, they mean it literally. A new

Teens inhaling blow-gun darts
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Don’t run with scissors, and don’t inhale homemade blow-gun darts.

Cassini takes inter-planetary portrait. What happens next?
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So you’ve waved at Saturn and had your picture taken by Cassini from nearly 900 million miles away. Now what?

It's time to 'Wave at Saturn' and smile for an interplanetary portrait
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It’s time to get ready for your not-so-close-up. NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on the far side of Saturn will snap a long-distance portrait of E

Why do cigarettes and booze go together? Stress may be the key
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Just in time for the summer cocktail season, there's a research finding that offers a new recipe for excessive alcohol consumption. Let's ca

Evolution not as unpredictable as thought, study says
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Say you could hop into a DeLorean and travel back to when life on Earth began. Would fish migrate from water to land? Would the dinosaurs go

Avoiding estrogen therapy proved deadly for nearly 50,000: study
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Hormone replacement therapy has plummeted among U.S. women since the Women’s Health Initiative cut short its Estrogen Plus Progestin Trial i

Attempt to steer McDonald's diners toward smaller meals backfires
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You might think that customers buying their lunch at McDonald’s would order meals with fewer calories if someone handed them a slip of paper

Dinosaurs had teeth to spare -- lots of them
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Dinosaurs almost bankrupted the tooth fairy. New research shows that the lumbering plant-eaters called sauropods produced new teeth as often

Scientists may have found the source of all the gold in the universe
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Astronomers panning the heavens for glints of gamma-ray bursts have struck gold. No, really. They found gold – so much of it, in fact, that

Florida man awakens in Palm Springs ER speaking only Swedish. Why?
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It's a story that is captivating people on both sides of the Atlantic.