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Kam-Yung Soh
Attended National University of Singapore
Lives in Singapore
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Kam-Yung Soh

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"The BBC has revealed the final design of its Micro:Bit computer in a launch event in London.  The single-board computing device, unveiled back in March, will be given free to every child starting secondary school in the UK this autumn as part of the corporation’s Make It Digital initiative.
[...]
The Micro:Bit has changed significantly since it was announced: the device now has a friendly rectangular shape, designed by Shoreditch hardware startup Tech Will Save Us. The board now houses an ARM Cortex M-O processor and an accelerometer and magnetometer, as well as the prexisting 5x5 LED matrix display and two face buttons. It will also offer Bluetooth LE capability, USB, and a combined croc-clip/edge connector, which will allow children to connect the Micro:Bit to similar boards such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi. The coin cell has also been swapped for a AAA battery pack for use when untethered from a PC.
 
The board will be accompanied with an online coding environment that will include Blockly, Python, and Microsoft's TouchDevelop platform; the BBC has partnered with a number of education startups including CodeClub, Coder Dojo and Decoded to provide educational support for the device. Samsung is also working on a mobile app to flash the device over Bluetooth."
The BBC confirms launch details of its Micro:Bit computer, which will be given free to every year 7 student in the UK this autumn
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Kam-Yung Soh

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The things we're learning from the doubly domesticated longhorn. "Dr. Hillis, 56, and the recipient of a 1999 MacArthur “genius” fellowship, has been employing genetics, biochemistry and computation to figure out how this breed of cattle developed its trademark feature.

We spoke for two hours in Austin and later by telephone. A condensed and edited version of both conversations follows:

Q. How exactly did this hobby of yours begin: researching the evolutionary history of the Texas longhorn?

A. It started about 10, 15 years ago when my wife and I bought a ranch outside Austin. In thinking about what we wanted to do with the property, we hoped to connect it to some aspect of Texas history. That’s what led us to longhorns. These animals are not only a symbol of the state, they have an unusual biological history.

Like all cattle, they were domesticated about 10,000 years ago from the wild aurochsen. But they are special because they went wild a second time and were twice domesticated. There aren’t a lot of animals for whom this is true. We don’t really know a lot about how animals changed while being domesticated. It seemed we could learn a lot by studying this breed.
[...]
[Q] Are you gratified to see, because of phylogenetics, how practical the applications for evolutionary biology have become?

[A] Oh, absolutely. In my lifetime, the applications have exploded. But the intellectual side is still compelling, because we are talking about the connections that stretch across all life.

I sometimes tell my students how fascinating it is to think about how I’m related to the cotton fibers in my shirt. Think about it: About a billion years ago, we had a common ancestor, and it began to diverge into two species, and one of them, a billion years later, ended up being a cotton plant and the other ended up being us!"
David M. Hillis, an evolutionary biologist, has employed genetics, biochemistry and computation to figure out how those horns got so long.
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"Today marks the 114th birthday of Japanese filmmaker Tsuburaya Eiji, best known as the creator of kitsch-horror classic Godzilla and the Ultraman superhero series. He pioneered the art of tokusatsu, or special effects involving the use of miniatures and scaled-down city sets—that remarkably is still being used by his studio that continues to create movies.

As an homage to this filmmaker’s legacy, Google is celebrating Tsuburaya with an interactive doodle that gives you a taste of what it’s like to make your own tokusatsu movie. Based on how nimble you are with harnessing Ultraman or swatting the UFOs, you’ll get a very different film at the end of your ten tasks. Go to the Google homepage to try it out yourself!

Read on for a glimpse behind the curtain with Googler Shun Ikeda and doodler Jennifer Hom, on the creative process behind this doodle."
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Worthwhile read. Usman T Malik on encouraging SF (and related genre) in Pakistan and anywhere else. "How many years are wasted all over Pakistan studying everything but learning nothing? Why does it happen?

My answer: The students and my respected teacher had no imagination.

Lack of imagination meant they had no vision and no conviction. They weren’t even interested in the possibility that any of the three attributes might be useful.

Is it a shock to anyone that Pakistan has been in the grip of an existential crisis for the last 60-some years? Outlining the root causes and effects of it is outside the scope of this article, but I will take a moment here to make a (seemingly) preposterous claim: Encouraging science fiction, fantasy, and horror readership has the potential to alleviate or fix many of Pakistan’s problems."
How science fiction can spur Pakistan into the 21st century
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Because little light penetrates the deep sea, many of its inhabitants have evolved highly specialised eyes to detect the faintest changes in their surroundings. The tiny squid, which measures in at just 20 centimetres (8 inches), is one such creature. While one of its eyes is small and relatively unassuming, the other is extremely large, and fluoresces a brilliant green. 
The team at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) is using blue light to understand fluorescence in deep-sea animals. The result is a brilliant light show, starring an amazing squid with a peculiar pair of eyes!
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Kam-Yung Soh

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"From inside the Gijs Van Vaerenbergh-designed art church known as Reading Between The Lines, the natural sunlight hits the ground in a noirish checkerboard, belying the construction's almost completely insubstantial walls. However, from any other angle, the building seems like a solid little chapel. 
[...]
Effectively a giant optical illusion, Reading Between The Lines serves as not only a statement about the permanence of architecture but also the relative sturdiness of church institutions themselves by creating a quiet place of reflection where one is at once removed from and exposed to the outside world."
Part modern art project, part traditional chapel, this see-through church is only substantial from the right angle
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Kam-Yung Soh

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Nice. "+Brian Switek ‏@Laelaps

This is Palaeovespa, a 34 million year old wasp found @FlorissantNPS.#FossilTime"
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Nice coverage of this year's Maker Faire Singapore [ http://makerfairesingapore.com/ ]. Correction: it is at 15 Tampines St. 11, not the Singapore Science Centre as stated in the article. "Eighty-five miles north of the equator in Southeast Asia lies the island country of Singapore, home to five and a half million people, a handful of Makerspaces, and a growing Maker community. In 2012, Science Centre Singapore hosted the first Singapore Mini Maker Faire, which featured 20 maker exhibits and attracted 1,000 attendees.

As co-organizers of the annual Singapore Science Festival, which traditionally features science projects rooted in academia, Science Centre Singapore wanted to showcase the local community’s STEAM projects made in home labs and Makerspaces. This year, in collaboration with A*STAR and iDA Singapore, they’ve grown their Faire from a Mini to a featured event. Maker Faire Singapore, taking place July 11 and 12 at Science Centre Singapore [edit: it is at 15, Tampines Street 11], will feature 250 Maker exhibits, and 10,000 visitors are expected."
Maker Faire Singapore is on the horizon, and has a lot of exciting speakers and Maker exhibits that you won't want to miss.
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Kam-Yung Soh

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"Project NOAH Fact of the Day: Spiny orb-weaver is a common name for the spider genus Gasteracantha, due to the prominent spines on their abdomen. These spiders can reach sizes of up to 30mm in diameter (measured from spike to spike). They can be found on all continents except for Antarctica.

Kite Spider (Gasteracantha falcicornis) spotted in Morogoro, Tanzania by PN user Aciinonyx"
Colourful spider with horn-like structures.
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"Alex Bellos, the author of bestselling popular maths books including Alex’s Adventures in Numberland, has teamed up with British mathematical artist Edmund Harriss to create Snowflake, Seashell, Star, a series of mathematical patterns first to colour, and then to create, using simple rules. Out from Canongate in September, it will be, said the publisher, “both a field guide and a therapeutic exercise book”: it requires no mathematical knowledge, but is “a stunning celebration of how mathematics is the search to understand the patterns of the universe in their purest form”."
 
Alex Bellos and Edmund Harriss’s Snowflake, Seashell, Star promises to be ‘both a field guide and a therapeutic exercise book’
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Not deterred by the dangers of studying deadly pathogens, 2015 Emerging Explorer Daniel Streicker specializes in the cross-species transmission of disease from bats and other animals. Learn more about how he hopes to prevent the next pandemic. 
Get information, facts, and more about biologist and epidemiologist Daniel Streicker from National Geographic.
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Have him in circles
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Education
  • National University of Singapore
    Electrical Engineering, 1998 - 2002
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
苏锦勇
Story
Tagline
An explorer of nature, science and various forms of entertainment.
Introduction
Know me by what I post.

Regarding my avatar: I call it "Explorer Foxkeh" and I use it to show that I'm interested in exploring the world.

Foxkeh is the 'mascot' of Mozilla Japan. Mozilla is one of my favourite organisations. The avatar is used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.1 Japan (CC BY-NC 2.1 JP) [ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.1/jp/deed.en ] license.

Link to the Foxkeh webpage: [ http://foxkeh.jp/ ] (Japan) [ http://www.foxkeh.com/ ] (English)
Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Software Engineer, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Singapore
Previously
Kuala Kangsar, Perak, Malaysia
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