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Kam-Yung Soh
Attended National University of Singapore
Lives in Singapore
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Kam-Yung Soh

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A good survival strategy...};-) "Not since Lincoln has there been a president fundamentally shaped — in his life, convictions and outlook on the world — by reading and writing as Barack Obama.

Last Friday, seven days before his departure from the White House, Mr. Obama sat down in the Oval Office and talked about the indispensable role that books have played during his presidency and throughout his life — from his peripatetic and sometimes lonely boyhood, when “these worlds that were portable” provided companionship, to his youth when they helped him to figure out who he was, what he thought and what was important.
[...]
“At a time when events move so quickly and so much information is transmitted,” he said, reading gave him the ability to occasionally “slow down and get perspective” and “the ability to get in somebody else’s shoes.” These two things, he added, “have been invaluable to me. Whether they’ve made me a better president I can’t say. But what I can say is that they have allowed me to sort of maintain my balance during the course of eight years, because this is a place that comes at you hard and fast and doesn’t let up.”
[...]
Mr. Obama entered office as a writer, and he will soon return to a private life as a writer, planning to work on his memoirs, which will draw on journals he’s kept in the White House (“but not with the sort of discipline that I would have hoped for”). He has a writer’s sensibility — an ability to be in the moment while standing apart as an observer, a novelist’s eye and ear for detail, and a precise but elastic voice capable of moving easily between the lyrical and the vernacular and the profound.
[...]
Mr. Obama says he is hoping to eventually use his presidential center website “to widen the audience for good books” — something he’s already done with regular lists of book recommendations — and then encourage a public “conversation about books.”

“At a time,” he says, “when so much of our politics is trying to manage this clash of cultures brought about by globalization and technology and migration, the role of stories to unify — as opposed to divide, to engage rather than to marginalize — is more important than ever.”"
In an interview seven days before leaving office, Mr. Obama talked about the role books have played during his presidency and throughout his life.
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Kam-Yung Soh

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Looks useful. Via Hacker News [ https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13406119 ] which includes this interesting comment: You might want to include common unix shell commands. At a previous job we had a customer with the last name of Echo who wasn't able to make a purchase. Turns out our credit card processor blocked them. "The Big List of Naughty Strings is an evolving list of strings which have a high probability of causing issues when used as user-input data. This is intended for use in helping both automated and manual QA testing; useful for whenever your QA engineer walks into a bar.

Why Test Naughty Strings?

Even multi-billion dollar companies with huge amounts of automated testing can't find every bad input. For example, look at what happens when you try to Tweet a zero-width space (U+200B) on Twitter:

Although this is not a malicious error, and typical users aren't Tweeting weird unicode, an "internal server error" for unexpected input is never a positive experience for the user, and may in fact be a symptom of deeper string-validation issues. The Big List of Naughty Strings is intended to help reveal such issues."

+Harish Pillay +Kam-Hung Soh
big-list-of-naughty-strings - The Big List of Naughty Strings is a list of strings which have a high probability of causing issues when used as user-input data.
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Kam-Yung Soh

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You can build it. Question is whether people will start to use it and live around it. "Less than a decade ago China had yet to connect any of its cities by bullet train. Today, it has 20,000km (12,500 miles) of high-speed rail lines, more than the rest of the world combined. It is planning to lay another 15,000km by 2025 (see map). Just as astonishing is urban growth alongside the tracks. At regular intervals—almost wherever there are stations, even if seemingly in the middle of nowhere—thickets of newly built offices and residential blocks rise from the ground.

China’s planners hope these will be like the railway towns that sprouted (at a slower pace) in America and Britain in the 19th century. In their rush to build, waste is inevitable. The question is whether gains will outweigh losses. Five years after the busiest bullet trains started running (the Beijing-Shanghai line opened in 2011), a tentative verdict is possible. In the densest parts of China, high-speed rail has been a boon: it is helping to create a deeply connected economy. But further inland, risks are mounting of excessive investment."
And there’s a lot more to come. But is it a waste of money?
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I don't know. +Gil Wizen believes that the wing patterns of the moth (left) is imitating that of the jumping spider (right). The mimicry might be better in a natural environment. See the comments in the link for further examples of this kind of mimicry. "Many moths rest with their hindwings concealed by the forewings, however these moths, belonging to genus Petrophila, had a unique body posture at rest, exposing only the dotted part of their hindwings. This pattern looked very familiar to me, but I could not pinpoint from where exactly. Then a few nights later one of these moths decided to rest pointing sideways with its head rather than upwards like most moths. And it finally hit me: this moth has an image of a jumping spider on its wings looking straight at you. The mimicry is so convincing that the moth wings even have hair-like scales where supposedly the spider’s head is.

I should be careful here. Pareidolia is a known phenomenon in which one searches for known patterns just about anywhere. It is what makes people see the face of Jesus Christ on a burnt piece of toast, it is what makes you see a face on a rocky terrain on Mars, and it what makes you see a number when looking at the wings of Diaethria species.

What I mean to say is that the color pattern on the wings of Petrophila species reminds me of a salticid spider, and perhaps it works the same for other animals as well."
Petrophila, a genus of Crambid moths that apparently evolved to look like a jumping spider
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Kam-Yung Soh
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Via Hacker News [ https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13406418 ]. I will admit that my knowledge of Unix history is lacking; I didn't know this. "The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix.

And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand.
[...]
Thomas opened his talk by saying “I love systems — operating systems in particular.” But even he had to marvel at the popularity of this 42-year-old Unix source code comment: “You started seeing people wearing sweatshirts, t-shirts, and baby onesies with ‘You are not expected to understand this’ It took off in the hacker community.” And geeks have been riffing on it ever since.
[...]
Thomas reminded the audience of Unix co-creator Dennis Ritchie‘s own “Comment about the comment” web page on the subject:

“It’s often quoted as a slur on the quantity or quality of the comments in the Bell Labs research releases of Unix. Not an unfair observation in general, I fear, but in this case unjustified… we tried to explain what was going on. ‘You are not expected to understand this’ was intended as a remark in the spirit of ‘This won’t be on the exam,’ rather than as an impudent challenge.”"
The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix. And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand. Computer science teacher Ozan Onay, who …
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Ha- I thought it was meant as 'this is terribly clever in an obscure way'
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"This striking Leopard Tortrix (Pseudatteria leopardina), a moth in the family Tortricidae, is our Spotting of the Week! Tortricidae is a large family of moths distributed worldwide, with the genus Pseudatteria containing some of the most striking representatives of the neotropical Tortricidae. Pseudatteria leopardina is found from Costa Rica to Bolivia. Spotted in Peru by Project Noah member Les Catchick."
A colourful day-flying metalmark moth - around 1-2 cm body. Who said moths were dull?
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A Malaysian sportsperson getting some press in the US. "Nicol David walked incognito through Grand Central Terminal this week, as if she were just another commuter on her way to Track 25. If this were her native country of Malaysia, David might have been mobbed by worshipers. But this was New York, where the sport of professional squash is paying only a fleeting visit.
[...]
David’s résumé is nothing short of astounding. After turning professional in 2000 at 17, she won the World Open title eight times and retained the No. 1 ranking for 108 consecutive months, a record streak that ended in July 2015.
[...]
While David practiced in relative anonymity at Grand Central on Thursday, there was at least one observer who appreciated her presence. Jahangir Khan was unbeaten in 555 matches, from 1981 to 1986, and is considered squash’s greatest player. He quit at age 29, he said, when he was losing only on rare occasions.

“My decision was getting out at the top,” Khan said. “But it’s phenomenal what she did for women’s squash. It’s not easy playing at the top level.”"
David, a Malaysian who was No. 1 for nine straight years and is now No. 7, is competing at Grand Central Terminal in the Tournament of Champions.
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Yup, you need bells and whistles to get the locals attention. ;0)

I knew a Jahangir Khan, his family is from Karachi too, but, he is a Computer programmer, lol.
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Leading the cycling revolution in Singapore. "62-year-old [Han Jok Kwang] is one of Singapore's biggest advocates of cycling, promoting its recreational benefits and potential as a mode of transport in a "green" and car-lite city.

He works closely with agencies such as the National Parks Board (NParks), which is behind the more than 300km-long Park Connector Network (PCN), and leads cycling trips for top civil servants and executives to get them to buy into the idea of cycling.

The chief information officer of a global electronics firm is one of the 14 members of the Active Mobility Advisory Panel, whose recommendations were incorporated in a Bill that was passed in Parliament last Tuesday.

The Bill's passing will soon make it legal for cyclists to share footpaths with pedestrians, and it also spells out the rules governing the use of personal mobility devices, including electric bicycles and scooters.
[...]
But the journey has only just begun, he reckons. "Cultural norms and habits will still have to change. It's time for us to learn to share common spaces, to be more considerate, more gracious and safety-conscious," he said."
As a child living in a kampung on the small island of Pulau Bukom in the 1960s, Mr Han Jok Kwang would cycle to school and make deliveries of bread for his parents, who owned a bakery.. Read more at straitstimes.com.
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A strong future for Singapore. More bikes, fewer cars. 
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It's a security trade-off. Know what it means and base your actions on that knowledge. "The Guardian ran a sensational story on Friday claiming a backdoor was discovered in WhatsApp, enabling intelligence agencies to snoop on encrypted messages. Gizmodo followed up saying it's no backdoor at all, but reasonable, intended behavior. So what's really going on here?

The issue at question is WhatsApp's answer to the question of what applications should do when someone's phone number changes (or they reinstall their app, or switch phones).
[...]
The difference between WhatsApp and Signal here is a case of sensible defaults. Signal was designed as a secure messaging tool first and foremost. Signal users are willing to tolerate lower reliability for more security. As anybody who's used Signal extensively can probably attest, these types of edge cases add up and overall the app can seem less reliable.
[...]
WhatsApp is not competing with Signal in the marketplace, but it does compete with many apps that are not end-to-end encrypted by default and don't have to make these security trade-offs, like Hangouts, Allo, or Facebook Messenger, and we applaud WhatsApp for giving end-to-end encryption to everyone whether they know it's there or not.

Nevertheless, this is certainly a vulnerability of WhatsApp, and they should give users the choice to opt into more restrictive Signal-like defaults."
The Guardian ran a sensational story on Friday claiming a backdoor was discovered in WhatsApp, enabling intelligence agencies to snoop on encrypted messages. Gizmodo followed up saying it's no backdoor at all, but reasonable, intended behavior. So what's really going on here? The lost phone, lost message dilemma The issue at question is WhatsApp's answer to the question of what applications should do when someone's phone number changes (or they r...
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Via Hacker News [ https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13406418 ]. I will admit that my knowledge of Unix history is lacking; I didn't know this. "The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix.

And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand.
[...]
Thomas opened his talk by saying “I love systems — operating systems in particular.” But even he had to marvel at the popularity of this 42-year-old Unix source code comment: “You started seeing people wearing sweatshirts, t-shirts, and baby onesies with ‘You are not expected to understand this’ It took off in the hacker community.” And geeks have been riffing on it ever since.
[...]
Thomas reminded the audience of Unix co-creator Dennis Ritchie‘s own “Comment about the comment” web page on the subject:

“It’s often quoted as a slur on the quantity or quality of the comments in the Bell Labs research releases of Unix. Not an unfair observation in general, I fear, but in this case unjustified… we tried to explain what was going on. ‘You are not expected to understand this’ was intended as a remark in the spirit of ‘This won’t be on the exam,’ rather than as an impudent challenge.”"
The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix. And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand. Computer science teacher Ozan Onay, who …
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There is hope for the future in the youth that volunteer to help save the horseshoe crabs. "Trudging through warm mud and getting stuck in it while you sweat bullets on a hot and humid afternoon is not everyone's cup of tea.

But for the 86 volunteers at the Mandai mudflats, the discomfort was a small price to pay.

They were there to participate in the Nature Society (Singapore)'s Horseshoe Crab Research and Rescue Programme, which saves the horseshoe crabs that have been caught in nets and collects data for conservation purposes.

"I wore normal shoes to the mudflats and getting stuck knee-deep was an interesting new experience," said Anglo-Chinese Junior College student Brenda Lee, 17.

"It was also frustrating and some of our friends lost their shoes. But rescuing horseshoe crabs is important as they are a vital part of our ecosystem that many of us neglect.
[...]
Volunteers can sign up for the sessions through the Nature Society's newsletter or website, or through schools and corporations. The sessions are open to the public.

However, registration for the next session on Feb 11 is full. For more information, go to https://www.nss.org.sg ."

Pictured: Volunteers with the Nature Society (Singapore) examining the Mandai mudflats for horseshoe crabs, as part of the organisation’s Horseshoe Crab Research and Rescue Programme. ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI
Trudging through warm mud and getting stuck in it while you sweat bullets on a hot and humid afternoon is not everyone's cup of tea.. Read more at straitstimes.com.
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A review of a book on the beautiful butterflies of India. "In his third book on Indian butterflies, Bombay Natural History Society Deputy Director Isaac Kehimkar describes 1,025 species and subspecies butterflies that occur in the Indian subcontinent. His two earlier books, Common Butterflies of India and The Book of Indian Butterflies (2008) had been well received, and this third book takes it to another level, covering a much larger number of species than previously featured.
[...]
Product Details : xii + 528 pages; 5-3/4 x 8-1/5; ISBN : 9789384678012 ; hardcover ; published by Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai, 2016."
Book Review - BNHS Field Guides Butterflies of India by Isaac Kehimkar Description : In his third book on Indian butterflies, Bombay...
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Kam-Yung's Collections
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An explorer of nature, science and various forms of entertainment.
Introduction
Know me by what I post.

Regarding my avatar: I call it "Explorer Foxkeh" and I use it to show that I'm interested in exploring the world.

Foxkeh is the 'mascot' of Mozilla Japan. Mozilla is one of my favourite organisations. The avatar is used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.1 Japan (CC BY-NC 2.1 JP) [ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.1/jp/deed.en ] license.

Link to the Foxkeh webpage: [ http://foxkeh.jp/ ] (Japan) [ http://www.foxkeh.com/ ] (English)
Education
  • National University of Singapore
    Electrical Engineering, 1998 - 2002
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苏锦勇
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Software Engineer
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Kuala Kangsar, Perak, Malaysia
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