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Kam-Yung Soh
Attended National University of Singapore
Lives in Singapore
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Kam-Yung Soh

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It's official [ https://sites.google.com/a/chromium.org/dev/chromium-os/chrome-os-systems-supporting-android-apps ]. "In an update to the corresponding Chrome OS support page, Google states that, "All Chromebooks launching in 2017 and after [...] will work with Android apps in the coming future." I don't think any of us are surprised by that, seeing as how the move makes all kinds of sense for everyone, but it's good to see it in writing."
Play Store and Android apps access on Chromebooks were announced in May of 2016 and in the time since, they have rolled as developer then stable builds to... by Rita El Khoury in Google, News
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Kam-Yung Soh

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Hugo Barra is leaving +Mi, moving back to Silicon Valley. His post about leaving on Facebook at [ https://www.facebook.com/hbarra76/posts/10154010035641612?pnref=story ]. "SINGAPORE: Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi's vice president of international operations, Mr Hugo Barra, is leaving the company after more than three years, he said in a Facebook post on Monday (Jan 23).

Mr Barra has been the public face of Xiaomi in the international market and its primary English-language spokesperson since he left Google to join the Chinese company in 2013.

He said the last few years of trying to position Xiaomi as an international brand and living in a "singular environment" had taken a "huge toll on his life and started affecting his health"."
The vice-president of international operations at the Chinese smartphone maker says he will
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Nanik T
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Let's see if he is going to start another #Android device startup :)
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"Today’s Doodle pays tribute to an early leader of the disability rights movement, Ed Roberts. After contracting polio at age 14, Roberts was paralyzed from the neck down. He was confined to a special wheelchair with a respirator during the day and slept in an 800-pound iron lung at night. Despite his limitations, he continued his studies via telephone hookup, attending in person a few hours a week. His mom, Zona, encouraged him persevere despite the odds.
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His mother Zona describes: “I watched Ed as he grew from a sports-loving kid, through bleak days of hopelessness, into self-acceptance of his physical limitations as he learned what was possible for him to accomplish. His years at UCB were great ones as he both enjoyed his college status and got in touch with his leadership qualities. He took great pleasure in watching people with disabilities achieve greater acceptance.”"
Ed Roberts’ 78th Birthday #GoogleDoodle
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Nice achievement. Via Hacker News [ https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13450095 ] which includes comments by the DDG Team and VCs that indicate they're in this for the long run with little pressure to change the privacy model. "DuckDuckGo revealed it has hit a milestone of 14 million searches in a single day. In addition, the search engine is celebrating a combined total of 10 billion searches performed, with 4 billion searches conducted in December 2016 alone.

For a niche search engine that many people don’t know exists, that’s some notable year-over-year growth. Around this same time last year, DuckDuckGo was serving 8–9 million searches per day on average."

+Harish Pillay
DuckDuckGo revealed it has hit a milestone of 14 million searches in a single day. In addition, the search engine is celebrating a combined total of 10 billion searches performed since launching in 2010.
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By default search engine on the browser and on my mobile.
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The next NASA Mars mission is to collect and seal samples for further analysis via a (future) return mission. "Adam Steltzner rose to engineering stardom in 2012, when NASA’s Curiosity rover plummeted to a perfect landing on Mars, thanks to a daring, fiery manoeuvre designed by his team. Now, all Steltzner wants to talk about is how to clean.

The object of his sanitary obsession is a dark-grey metallic tube about the size of his hand. It sits on a workbench inside a warehouse-like building at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, where Steltzner works as chief engineer for NASA’s next Mars rover. He needs the tube to be one of the cleanest objects ever created so that the rover can complete its mission.

As early as July 2020, the 1-tonne, 6-wheeled vehicle will blast off from Florida, carrying 43 such tubes on a 7-month trip to the red planet. Once it arrives, the rover will drive across the Martian surface and fill each tube with dirt, rock or air. Then it will seal the tubes, place them on the ground, and wait — for years, or possibly decades — for another spacecraft to retrieve them and fly them back to Earth. It will be humanity’s first attempt to bring back part of the red planet.

If all goes to plan, these will become the most precious extraterrestrial samples ever recovered. Tucked inside one of those metallic tubes could be evidence of life beyond Earth in the form of a microorganism, biominerals or organic molecules."
[...]
NASA has yet to decide on when the samples might come home. It has no Mars missions budgeted or approved after the 2020 rover. Managers at the agency’s headquarters have begun to hint that they would like to see an orbiter launch in 2022, to serve as a communications relay for future missions and to replace the ageing orbiters already there. After that, the priority will be to get the Martian samples back to Earth, while also supporting possible plans for human exploration of Mars. NASA is funding early studies into the idea of a Mars ascent vehicle — which would carry a small package of samples, perhaps the size of a bowling ball — into Mars orbit. Then an as-yet-unplanned spacecraft would collect the orbiting package and return it to a strict quarantine on Earth.

Farley recalls that he first started talking seriously about Mars sample return in the late 1980s. At the time, NASA estimated that it might take a decade to accomplish. It will still be at least a decade before Martian samples will be carried back to Earth, says Farley. “But at least we’re starting now.”"
NASA is now building the rover that it hopes will bring back signs of life on the red planet.
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lol - Cool .
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It depends on the scale you're using to look at the snowflakes. +Ethan Siegel explains. "If you’ve ever heard someone referred to as a “special little snowflake,” the implication is that they’re beautiful and precious because of all the myriad ways in which they are unique. The old saying goes that no two snowflakes are alike, but is that really true?
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[W]hen Guinness certifies two snowflakes as identical, they can only mean that it’s identical to the precision of the microscope; when physics demands that two things be identical, they mean identical down to the subatomic particle! That means:

- You need the same exact particles,
- In the same exact configuration,
- With the same bonds between them,
- In two entirely different macroscopic systems.

Let’s examine what it would take to get there.
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Nevertheless, many multiple snowflakes are alike, as in they’re very much like each other. But if you’re looking for truly identical, at a structural, molecular or atomic level, nature will never get you there. The number of possibilities is not just too great for the history of Earth, but for the history of the entire Universe."
And when you demand ‘perfectly identical,’ just how high of a bar are you setting?
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"The Most Perfect Thing: Inside (and Outside) a Bird’s Egg" by Tim Birkhead is on my reading list. "[Grrlscientist:] You may recall that I was a judge for the 2016 Royal Society Insight Investment popular Science Book Prize. So in addition to my usual reading material (scientific research papers and a variety of books), I read the entire longlist for that prize — which means I’ve read a total of more than one hundred (mostly science) books.

Because I was a judge for that prize, I was uncomfortable writing my usual, detailed book reviews because I didn’t want to give the impression of favoritism. Now that the winner of that prize has been announced, I am returning to my game: I am sharing some of the books published in 2016 that inspired me, and gave me great joy. As I’ve said throughout much of this year, the overall quality of science books has improved tremendously, such that 2016 includes the finest group of popular science books ever published, in my opinion. And after reading these books, I think you’ll agree with me."
This list will help you fulfil your New Year’s resolution to read (or read more) books — and you don’t even need to love birds to find…
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Churchill the futurist...};-) "Dear Quote Investigator: Scientists have successfully produced meat in culture without the need to grow an entire animal. Apparently, long ago Winston Churchill envisioned this possibility, and he predicted that chicken wings would be created without growing a full chicken. Would you please locate Churchill’s remarks on this topic?

Quote Investigator: The December 1931 issue of “The Strand Magazine” published an article by Churchill titled “Fifty Years Hence” that presented many speculations about the future including a remark about growing chicken parts. “Popular Mechanics Magazine” reprinted the essay in March 1932. Emphasis added to excerpts by QI:

With a greater knowledge of what are called hormones, i.e., the chemical messengers in our blood, it will be possible to control growth. We shall escape the absurdity of growing a whole chicken in order to eat the breast or wing, by growing these parts separately under a suitable medium."
Winston Churchill? Apocryphal? Dear Quote Investigator: Scientists have successfully produced meat in culture without the need to grow an entire animal. Apparently, long ago Winston Churchill envisioned this possibility, and he predicted that chicken wings would be created without growing a full ...
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Fascinating images of the faults. "Samsung's verdict: two separate battery construction issues were to blame. Samsung Electronics used two separate suppliers for the Galaxy Note 7—Samsung SDI, a sister company in Samsung Group, and Amperex Technology Ltd (ATL)—and it turns out both manufacturers had their own issues. Given that Samsung's first recall and attempted fix didn't work, it's no surprise that the problem behind the Galaxy Note 7 is a complicated one.
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Samsung says it has "reassessed every step of the smartphone manufacturing process" since the Note 7 recall, and in response has come up with a new "eight-point" battery safety check process. The new process includes the same investigative techniques that helped solve the Note 7 defects, like the use of an X-ray machine and physically disassembling the batteries and looking for problems. Samsung has also "formed a Battery Advisory Group of external advisers, academic and research experts to ensure it maintains a clear and objective perspective on battery safety and innovation." The product planning stage has changed, with Samsung promising an "improved battery design safety standard" with "brackets around the battery for protection" and "improved algorithms" for governing the battery."
Two different production problems from two different suppliers killed the Note 7.
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In aerospace some parts are more sensitive to process control than technical requirements. Samsung purchasing or engineering tried to save money and it cost them far more. I'm guessing process control is non existent.
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"Samsung says two different battery flaws were to blame for the fires that plagued its flagship Galaxy Note7 smartphone throughout the fall, leading to two separate recalls and, ultimately, the permanent withdrawal of the model from the market. The details are being released after an internal investigation, following weeks of speculation by reporters and analysts about what the company's report would conclude.

Consumer Reports and several other outlets were briefed on the findings in separate meetings on Thursday. An article published by the Wall Street Journal on Friday and widely cited by other news organizations said the report found that a number of the fires occurred because "some of the batteries were irregularly sized." That conflicts with details provided to Consumer Reports, and a Samsung representative said the information “did not come from Samsung.”
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The company used batteries from two suppliers in its Note7 phones—a company division called Samsung SDI and a separate company, Amperex Technology Ltd., that makes batteries for many smartphone brands. Samsung officials said the batteries from the two companies were designed and manufactured differently, and failed for separate reasons.

That distinction is important, because it helps explain the unusual sequence of events during the recalls in the fall. Samsung first said it was stopping sales of the phone on Sept. 2, and announced a formal recall on Sept. 15 in cooperation with the Consumer Product Safety Commission. But, with permission from the CPSC, Samsung began distributing replacement Note7 phones just a few days later.

Soon these, too, started catching fire and a second recall was announced on Oct. 13.

Now, Samsung is saying that its investigation shows there was no reason to believe the new phones would malfunction. "It was a very tough period, and we are sorry," DJ Koh, Samsung's global president of mobile communications, said during the briefing. "The most important thing for us is customer safety," and, ultimately, "earning back customers' trust.""

+Kwanghui Lim +Alfred Siew +Michael Tan
A Samsung investigation shows that fires in its Galaxy Note7 were caused by faulty batteries and were unrelated to other parts of the smartphone’s design and construction.
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Thank you, +Hubble Space Telescope for broadening our horizons. +Ethan Siegel shows how in lots of amazing images. "The Hubble Space Telescope took its first images in 1990, but there was a problem: the primary mirror was flawed. It was ever-so-slightly the wrong shape, meaning that the images it returned wound up slightly blurred and imperfect. It was really starting in 1993 — after the first servicing mission — that the science really started to skyrocket. That, of course and the awe that it brought us back.
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[D]on’t just have a look back at the amazing science we’ve done and how the Hubble Space Telescope has changed our view of the Universe forever; look forward to what we’re doing now and what new wonders might be in store. The Universe is all ours. All we need to do is look."
Science, pictures, and a revolution in what we know is out there.
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Interesting history of these Singapore girls, with a look at their charitable side. Also looks at when the Cheongsam became a fixture of ladies dressing. "For as little as a dollar for a set of three dance coupons, male customers could take the girl of their choice for a spin on the dance floor. But, invariably, the discussion would turn to the most famous “lancing” girl of all time: Rose Chan, a former beauty queen and striptease dancer who joined Happy World Cabaret in 1942. When asked what was it about Chan that was so memorable, many would say it was her audacity to strip completely on stage, or to shock audiences by wrestling with a live python in her acts.

Not many people were aware that Chan, like other “lancing” girls of that era, was involved in charity work. Perhaps it was an attempt to salvage some measure of self-respect or to assuage a sense of guilt, or maybe it was borne out of genuine sympathy for the destitute as many of the cabaret girls themselves came from poor or dysfunctional families. A pretty face and a comely figure was all that women like Chan could claim. But with the money they earned in the cabaret, they could make the lives of the downtrodden slightly better.
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In 1946, cabaret girls from Happy World answered the call by one of its “big sisters”, Madam He Yan Na, to donate money to set up a Chinese medium school in Singapore. Madam He, the chairperson of the Happy World Dance Troupe (which later became the Happy Opera Society), was deeply troubled by the large number of idle children roaming the streets of Geylang. These were the unfortunate children who had their education interrupted by World War II.

Madam He roped in her fellow dance hostesses to set up the school. She became the chairperson of the school’s board of governors, while another dancer, Madam Xu Qian Hong, took on the role of accounts head. Other girls from the Happy Opera Society became board members.
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What did Chinese women wear in the 1920s? The samfoo (or samfu) was the preferred casual attire, comprising a cotton short-sleeved blouse with a Mandarin collar and frog-buttons, and a matching pair of trousers in the same material. By the 1930s, however, wealthy Chinese women in the upper social classes had turned to the cheongsam (which means “long dress” in Cantonese), also known as qipao in Mandarin, as their preferred dress.

This adoption of the cheongsam soon cut across all segments of the Chinese population, with the elegant and form-fitting dress worn as a symbol of strong feminine expression. The cabaret girls were no different. In their figure-hugging cheongsam with daring side slits that showed off their legs, they were a sight to behold with their artfully applied makeup and coiffured hair-dos."
A quarterly journal to promote the collections and programmes of the National Library, and to foster research and learning in the history, arts and culture of Singapore and Southeast Asia.
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Kam-Yung's Collections
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An explorer of nature, science and various forms of entertainment.
Introduction
Know me by what I post.

Regarding my avatar: I call it "Explorer Foxkeh" and I use it to show that I'm interested in exploring the world.

Foxkeh is the 'mascot' of Mozilla Japan. Mozilla is one of my favourite organisations. The avatar is used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.1 Japan (CC BY-NC 2.1 JP) [ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.1/jp/deed.en ] license.

Link to the Foxkeh webpage: [ http://foxkeh.jp/ ] (Japan) [ http://www.foxkeh.com/ ] (English)
Education
  • National University of Singapore
    Electrical Engineering, 1998 - 2002
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Male
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苏锦勇
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Software Engineer
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  • Software Engineer, present
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Singapore
Previously
Kuala Kangsar, Perak, Malaysia
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