> The nation has spoken: weird pointless $400 wi-fi enabled juicer company Juicero is the perfect symbol of Silicon Valley. [...] I want to take a step back and suggest a reality check.

> While Deadspin was busy calling Silicon Valley “awful nightmare trash parasites”, my girlfriend in Silicon Valley was working for a company developing a structured-light optical engine to manipulate single cells and speed up high-precision biological research. [...] a bunch of my friends in Silicon Valley were working for Wave, a company that helps immigrants send remittances to their families in East Africa [...] Silicon Valley was leading a revolution in solar power that’s resulted in a 1500% increase in cell installations over the past few years. [...]

> Or maybe we should try to be more quantitative about this. I looked at the latest batch of 52 startups from legendary Silicon Valley startup incubator Y Combinator. [...] Thirteen of them had an altruistic or international development focus [...] Twelve of them seemed like really exciting cutting-edge technology [...] Eighteen of them seemed like boring meat-and-potatoes companies aimed at businesses [...] And the remaining nine were your ridiculous niche Uber-for-tacos startups that we all know and love. [...] I also looked at the first twenty startups in the portfolio of Andreessen Horowitz, a famous Valley venture capitalist firm [...]

> So although meat-and-potato business/software companies do outnumber really high-tech or altruistic ventures, there’s not a lot of evidence for silly Juicero-style startups being much of the Silicon Valley business community at all. So how come everyone thinks that they are?

> Here’s my theory. If you’re an average well-off person, leading your average well-off life, consuming average well-off media and seeing ads targeted at the average well-off demographic, and going over to your average well-off friends’ houses and seeing their average well-off products, which are you more likely to hear about? A structured-light optical engine for cytological research? Or a juicer?
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